Courtesy: Flickr/by Phillie Casablanca

Courtesy: Flickr/by Phillie Casablanca

Not everyone gets to have quite the affectionate relationship with technology that Joaquin Phoenix has with Samantha in Her. But it’s nearly Valentine’s Day, and so as good a time as any to at least review some of the ways that semantic and related technologies are helping us find — and stay — in love:

  • Graphing relationships is the game at dating app Hinge, which works to connect Facebook friends with friends’ friends, using their history and likes to build a graph about each other that gets the love conversation started. The free mobile data-driven matchmaking app is available in  NYC, DC, Philadelphia, and Boston, and most recently came online in San Francisco, too.
  • Folks in search of romance also have the Freebase-powered LoveFlutter to check into. It, too, makes use of your Facebook interests and extends that with the help of the Freebase’s database to fill out other details about those interests – such as what genre of movies it is that you like – to semantically connect your interests with that of other users, and you with them. It will use that data to suggest a great first date spot for you, too. Costs range from free to $29.99 month.

  • Zoosk takes the tack of a behavioral matchmaking engine that learns as you click and send messages to potential matches. The global, mobile matchmaker uses your actions as a guide to personalize your dating experience, pointing you to a new potential partner every 24 hours. It’s continuously improving its suggestions based on what it learns about you, the company reports, and it says this has led it to consistently rank as the No. 1 iPhone and iPad dating app.
  • Already got your match? LovePong may be more your speed: The interactive game developed by an artificial intelligence computer scientist is meant to help couples improve communication and deepen intimacy. Start today and you might have your love life in order before year’s end: The 30-week course delivers communications exercises along with context-sensitive online coaching on how to communicate more effectively, and keeps track to make sure that you’re completing your assignments, too. The online games functionality is free, but premium members also get expanded challenges, a heartbeat monitor and dashboard for tracking progress, and Love Lists to help explore what makes them feel loved and pleasured – and their partners, too.
  • Perhaps you’re more interested in creating your own semantic dating platform? Head on over to Kudos Knowledge Semantic Platform and API, which suggests among the potential semantic applications and development projects to accomplish with its technology a dating application that has a widget find a potential person to ask out after analyzing your interests and likes and that of potential partners for someone with similar tastes. Or, it can connect to users’ Facebook accounts to gather the information, with the potential to add dating or psychological algorithms to see if two people are suited based on similarities or not.

Here’s to your making the semantic love connection that’s right for you. Happy Valentine’s Day!