How the Semantic Web Will Change News

Old NewsPaul Sparrow of AJR.org recently wrote, “In his book ‘Weaving the Web,’ Tim Berners-Lee described the semantic web. ‘I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web — the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A ‘Semantic Web,’ which makes this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The ‘intelligent agents’ people have touted for ages will finally materialize.’ The question is, will the provider of that customized information be a media company or a technology company? A new wave of change is sweeping the media landscape, and news organizations will need to make radical changes if they want to survive this tsunami of media transformation.” Read more

Winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge Announced at the International Semantic Web Conference Held in Italy

swcAMSTERDAM, October 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge (SWC). Selected by a jury of leading experts in the computer science discipline from both academia and industry, winners were announced at the International Semantic Web Conference held in Riva del Garda, Italy, this month. Both the challenge and awards were sponsored by Elsevier. Read more

Halloween Scares Of Another Variety

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

What could be scarier than a haunted house on Halloween, packed with ghouls, axe murderers and the standard array of blood and guts?

Well, maybe the real fright night lies with technology. Consider the following scares that might just send Michael Myers himself into a terror tizzy:

  • Artificial intelligence. Tesla, Paypal and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, as reported in this article in Mashable, recently told an audience at MIT’s Centennial Symposium that, “With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon.” Musk said to attendees that he probably ranks AI as our biggest existential threat, commenting that, “In all those stories where there’s the guy with the pentagram and the holy water, it’s like, ‘Yeah, he’s sure he can control the demon.’ Doesn’t work out.”

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Semantic Technology Jobs: eBay

ebayeBay is looking for an Applied Research Engineer in San Jose, CA. According to the post, this position will be the “Technical lead for applying natural language processing, data mining, and image processing to help drive definition of product direction, improve social commerce, and increase social networks. Define, design, and implement complex data processes, data pipeline to improve buyer experience at eBay. As a self-motivated and enthusiastic member of our team, you will work with extremely talented peers in a fun environment pushing the performance bar while solving various problems. Develop innovative solutions that not only meet functionality requirements but meet performance, scalability and reliability requirements while adhering to implementation schedules, development principles and product goals.” Read more

Twitter Lets Researchers Mine Through Its Data

TwitterIANS Live recently wrote, “[Twitter] has finally given access to its vast database to a selected pool of researchers to study tweets and find answers to a variety of issues. As part of its ambitious data grant programme, Twitter is allowing academic researchers across various fields to ‘go back and study things’ over, with almost a decade of historical data, Washington Post reported. While Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital are looking at tweets about food-poisoning cases to find answers to the spread of food-borne illnesses, researchers from the University of California at San Diego are studying whether happy people are likely to post happy images on Twitter.” Read more

FLAX a Winner on the World’s Technology Stage

flax29 October, 2014 — Software designed at the University of Waikato and used all around the world has won a major international competition.

FLAX, which stands for Flexible Learning Acquisition, has taken first place at the Linked Vici Competition, held to acknowledge development in open and linked data for educational purposes.

The win was announced at the 13th International Semantic Web Conference, in Riva del Garda, Italy, with FLAX taking first place from 10 shortlisted candidates. Read more

Retrieving and Using Taxonomy Data from DBpedia

DBpedia logo on a halloween jack-o-lanternDBpedia, as described in the recent semanticweb.com article DBpedia 2014 Announced, is “a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web.” It currently has over 3 billion triples (that is, facts stored using the W3C standard RDF data model) available for use by applications, making it a cornerstone of the semantic web.

A surprising amount of this data is expressed using the SKOS vocabulary, the W3C standard model for taxonomies used by the Library of Congress, the New York Times, and many other organizations to publish their taxonomies and subject headers. (semanticweb.com has covered SKOS many times in the past.) DBpedia has data about over a million SKOS concepts, arranged hierarchically and ready for you to pull down with simple queries so that you can use them in your RDF applications to add value to your own content and other data.

Where is this taxonomy data in DBpedia?

Many people think of DBpedia as mostly storing the fielded “infobox” information that you see in the gray boxes on the right side of Wikipedia pages—for example, the names of the founders and the net income figures that you see on the right side of the Wikipedia page for IBM. If you scroll to the bottom of that page, you’ll also see the categories that have been assigned to IBM in Wikipedia such as “Companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange” and “Computer hardware companies.” The Wikipedia page for Computer hardware companies lists companies that fall into this category, as well as two other interesting sets of information: subcategories (or, in taxonomist parlance, narrower categories) such as “Computer storage companies” and “Fabless semiconductor companies,” and then, at the bottom of the page, categories that are broader than “Computer hardware companies” such as “Computer companies” and “Electronics companies.”

How does DBpedia store this categorization information? The DBpedia page for IBM shows that DBpedia includes triples saying that IBM has Dublin Core subject values such as category:Companies_listed_on_the_New_York_Stock_Exchange and category:Computer_hardware_companies. The DBpedia page for the category Computer_hardware_companies shows that is a SKOS concept with values for the two key properties of a SKOS concept: a preferred label and broader values. The category:Computer_hardware_companies concept is itself the broader value of several other concepts such as category:Fabless_semiconductor_companies. Because it’s the broader value of other concepts and has its own broader values, it can be both a parent node and a child node in a tree of taxonomic terms, so DBpedia has the data that lets you build a taxonomy hierarchy around any of its categories.

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Semantic Web Jobs: Orbis Technologies

OrbisOrbis Technologies is looking for a Software Developer – Cloud and Big Data in Annapolis, MD. According to the post, “Orbis Technologies, located in Annapolis, MD, is a leader in providing cloud computing-based semantic text analytics, using MapReduce, to support entity extraction, relationship identification, and semantic search in a Hadoop cloud-processing environment. We are interested in speaking to talented candidates who desire to further their careers in big data and open source development predominantly in Java, and work with cloud computing including the use of Hadoop, Accumulo, CloudBase, HBase, and core semantic web technologies.” Read more

Smart Recipe Platform Yummly Brings Contextual Recommendations to iOS Apps

YummlyREDWOOD CITY, CA–(Marketwired – Oct 28, 2014) – Yummly (http://www.yummly.com), the leading innovator in recipe search & discovery, announced today, the introduction of contextual recommendations on the iPhone and iPad apps. When users open the app, in addition to personalizing the content to a user’s tastes, Yummly will now tailor to a person’s time, place and patterns.

Yummly’s proprietary Food Genome and patent-pending Food Intelligence technology already blends together to create an unmatched user experience with data-driven features such as personalized recommendations, semantic search, and a smart shopping list. With the new contextual recommendations functionality, it is bringing together more relevant and dynamic content to the users by leveraging a combination of contextual signals such as time of day, day of week, season, location, trends and more. Read more

Just What We’ve All Been Waiting For: Bing Now Offers Emoji Search

queenZach Miners of PC World reports, “Bing now supports searches with emoji, meaning you can insert or paste a range of emoji icons like hearts, smiley faces, food graphics, or any combination thereof, for some interesting, though not always useful, results. It’s a novelty feature, yes, but still fun. And one that could help Bing draw at least some attention away from Google. Google at the moment does not give results for emoji searches, though its auto-complete technology does recognize them. Yahoo, meanwhile, does support emoji searches. Bing’s tool is available in all English markets, the search engine said, offered as an homage to the shorthand’s popularity.” Read more

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