Eric Franzon

NEW WEBINAR Announced: Yosemite Project – Part 3

“Transformations for Integrating VA data with FHIR in RDF”

Yosemite Project Part 3: Part 3-Transformations for Integrating VA data with FHIR in RDF SemanticWeb.com recently launched a series of webinars on the topic of “RDF as a Universal Healthcare Exchange Language.”

Part 1 of that series, “The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information Interoperability,” is available as a recorded webinar and slide deck.

Part 2,The Ideal Medium for Health Data? A Dive into Lab Tests,” will take place on November 7, 2014 (registration is open as of this writing).

Announcing Part 3:

click here to register now!
TITLE: Transformations for Integrating VA data with FHIR in RDF
DATE: Wednesday, November 12, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
DESCRIPTION: In our series on The Yosemite Project, we explore RDF as a data standard for health data. In this installment, we will hear from Rafael Richards, Physician Informatician, Office of Informatics and Analytics in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), about “Transformations for Integrating VA data with FHIR in RDF.”

The VistA EHR has its own data model and vocabularies for representing healthcare data. This webinar describes how SPARQL Inference Notation (SPIN) can be used to translate VistA data to the data represented used by FHIR, an emerging interchange standard.

 

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NEW WEBINAR Announced: Yosemite Project – Part 2

“The Ideal Medium for Health Data? A Dive into Lab Tests”

Yosemite Project webinar part 2: The Ideal Medium for Health DataSemanticWeb.com recently launched a series of webinars on the topic of “RDF as a Universal Healthcare Exchange Language.” Part 1 of that series, “The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information Interoperability,” is available as a recorded webinar and slide deck at:
http://semanticweb.com/webinar-yosemite-project-part-1-rdf-roadmap-healthcare-information-interoperability-video_b44757

Announcing Yosemite Project – Part 2:

click here to register now!
TITLE: The Ideal Medium for Health Data? A Dive into Lab Tests
DATE: Friday, November 7, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
DESCRIPTION: In our series on The Yosemite Project, we explore RDF as a data standard for health data. In this installment, we will hear from Conor Dowling, CTO of Caregraf about “The Ideal Medium for Health Data? A Dive into Lab Tests.”

Lab tests and results have many dimensions from substances measured to timing to the condition of a patient. This presentation will show how RDF is the best medium to fully capture this highly nuanced data.

 

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WEBINAR: The Yosemite Project – Part 1: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information Interoperability (VIDEO)

The Yosemite Project - Part 1In case you missed last Friday’s webinar, “The Yosemite Project – Part 1: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information Interoperability” delivered by David Booth, the recording and slides are now available (and posted below). The webinar was co-produced by SemanticWeb.com and DATAVERSITY.net and runs for one hour, including a Q&A session with the audience that attended the live broadcast.

If you watch this webinar, please use the comments section below to share your questions, comments, and ideas for webinars you would like to see in the future.

About the Webinar

Interoperability of electronic healthcare information remains an enormous challenge in spite of 100+ available healthcare information standards. This webinar explains the Yosemite Project, whose mission is to achieve semantic interoperability of all structured healthcare information through RDF as a common semantic foundation. It explains the rationale and technical strategy of the Yosemite Project, and describes how RDF and related standards address a two-pronged strategy for semantic interoperability: facilitating collaborative standards convergence whenever possible, and crowd-sourced data translations when necessary.

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WEBINAR: Monetizing Content with Semantic Technologies (Video)

Title Slide: Monetizing Content wit Semantic TechnologiesIn case you missed Wednesday’s webinar, “Monetizing Content with Semantic Technologies” delivered by Gerald Burnand of NTENT, the recording and slides are now available (and posted below). The webinar was co-produced by SemanticWeb.com and DATAVERSITY.net and runs for one hour, including a Q&A session with the audience that attended the live broadcast.

If you watch this webinar, please use the comments section below to share your questions, comments, and ideas for webinars you would like to see in the future.

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Two “Don’t Miss” Webinars this Week

Later this week, SemanticWeb.com will host two webinars, and (free) registration is open for both.

WEDNESDAY Webinar

Webinar: Monetizing Content with Semantic TechnologiesDATE: Wednesday, October 15, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
MORE INFORMATION: http://semanticweb.com/webinar-monetizing-content-semantic-technologies_b44562click here to register now!

GeraldBurnand-150sqSPEAKER: Gerald Burnand is the chief technology officer at NTENT, a search technology company that leverages its proprietary services to deliver more valuable results for advertisers, publishers, and consumers across targeted vertical industries. Geraldhas over 25 years of experience in the domain of computer science, with an emphasis on semantic search technologies for the past 10 years. At NTENT, Gerald is able to exercise his passion for solving problems involving Big Data and semantics. Previously, Gerald delivered complete solutions for an auction house and a private bank in Switzerland. During the last 12 years with this company, Gerald worked on projects ranging from video analysis and video broadcasting platforms, to enterprise search and web scale search engine. Gerald holds a degree in Computer Science, Management and Finance from the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

FRIDAY Webinar

The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information InteroperabilityDATE: Friday, October 17, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
MORE INFORMATION: http://semanticweb.com/webinar-yosemite-project-rdf-roadmap-healthcare-information-interoperability_b44575

click here to register now!

Photo of David BoothSPEAKER: David Booth is a senior software architect at Hawaii Resource Group, LLC, using Semantic Web technology to make clinical healthcare data interoperable between diverse systems. He previously worked at KnowMED, using Semantic Web technology for healthcare quality-of-care and clinical outcomes measurement, and at PanGenX, applying Semantic Web technology to genomics in support of personalized medicine. Before that he worked on Cleveland Clinic’s SemanticDB project, which uses RDF and other semantic technologies to perform cardiovascular research. Prior to that was a software architect at HP Software, where his primary focus was emerging technologies. He was a W3C Fellow from 2002 to 2005, where he worked on Web Services standards before becoming involved in Semantic Web technology. He has been programming for many years using a variety of programming languages and operating systems. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA.

WEBINAR: The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information Interoperability

The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information InteroperabilityDATE: Friday, October 17, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees

This webinar has passed. The recording (posted within two business days of the live event) can be found in the “Webinar” section of SemanticWeb.com.

About the Webinar

Register Now!Interoperability of electronic healthcare information remains an enormous challenge in spite of 100+ available healthcare information standards. This webinar explains the Yosemite Project, whose mission is to achieve semantic interoperability of all structured healthcare information through RDF as a common semantic foundation. It explains the rationale and technical strategy of the Yosemite Project, and describes how RDF and related standards address a two-pronged strategy for semantic interoperability: facilitating collaborative standards convergence whenever possible, and crowd-sourced data translations when necessary.

We hope you will join us on October 17, 2014 for this free webinar.

Register today to reserve your spot!

 

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WEBINAR: Monetizing Content with Semantic Technologies

Webinar: Monetizing Content with Semantic TechnologiesDATE: Wednesday, October 15, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees

This webinar has passed. The recording (posted within two business days of the live even) can be found in the “Webinar” section of SemanticWeb.com.

About the Webinar

Register Now!Semantic technology solves a concrete problem: sorting through large collections of unstructured data. With unstructured data expected to account for over 80 percent of all data within the next five years, the ability to target this data using semantic technology opens doors to better understand context and intent in search, and ultimately achieve greater visibility and relevant results. This presentation will showcase how semantic technologies can understand article content and select contextually relevant adverts to most effectively monetize content for advertisers and publishers.

  • Discover how semantic technology helps thousands of advertisers reach their audience in a meaningful way, and helps hundreds of online publishers monetize their content.
  • Learn how semantic technology reduces errors and time spent by marketers when defining their campaigns and yield better overall results.
  • Understand some of the challenges that come with semantic technologies and how to address them ahead of time.
  • Go behind the scenes with semantic and linguistic processing of web pages.

We hope you will join us on October 15, 2014 for this free webinar.

Register today to reserve your spot!

 

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GitHub Adds schema.org Actions to Email Notifications via JSON-LD

GitHub logoStéphane Corlosquet has noticed that GitHub has added schema.org Actions using the JSON-LD syntax to the notification emails that GitHub users receive.

On Twitter, Corlosquet posted:

Tweet from @scolorquet: "Looks like @github just started to use http://schema.org  actions with JSON-LD in their notifications emails! "

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Want a music suggestion? Just ask DJ Twitter.

screen shot of a seevl hack in action via Alexandre Passant.Alexandre Passant, founder of seevl, which we have covered before, has hacked together a cool proof of concept. He describes the project as using “Twitter As A Service,” and it leverages Twitter, YouTube, and the seevl API. As Passant describes, “The result is a twitter bot, running under our @seevl handle, which accepts a few (controlled) natural-language queries and replies with an appropriate track, embedded in a Tweet via a YouTube card.”

He continues, “As it’s all Twitter-based, not only you can send messages, but you can have a conversation with your virtual DJ.”

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DBpedia 2014 Announced

DBpedia logoProfessor Dr. Christian Bizer of the University of Mannheim, Germany, has announced the release of DBpedia 2014. DBpedia is described at dbpedia.org as  “… a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself.”

The full announcement on the new release is reprinted below with Bizer’s permission.

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DBpedia Version 2014 released

1. the new release is based on updated Wikipedia dumps dating from April / May 2014 (the 3.9 release was based on dumps from March / April 2013), leading to an overall increase of the number of things described in the English edition from 4.26 to 4.58 million things.

2. the DBpedia ontology is enlarged and the number of infobox to ontology mappings has risen, leading to richer and cleaner data.

The English version of the DBpedia knowledge base currently describes 4.58 million things, out of which 4.22 million are classified in a consistent ontology (http://wiki.dbpedia.org/Ontology2014), including 1,445,000 persons, 735,000 places (including 478,000 populated places), 411,000 creative works (including 123,000 music albums, 87,000 films and 19,000 video games), 241,000 organizations (including 58,000 companies and 49,000 educational institutions), 251,000 species and 6,000 diseases. Read more

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