SemanticWeb.com

How To Structure Your On Page Content For Semantic Relevance

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Five in a Six Part Series. Here are the other parts.

So far in this series we’ve looked at why semantics is important for search engine optimization, how to research semantic keywords on Google, how to create a Semantic Map for your web site content and how to structure your web site linking for semantic relevance.

Now it’s time to take a look at on-page content and the best tips and techniques to organize individual pages for semantic relevance.

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Five in a Six Part Series. Here are the other parts.

So far in this series we’ve looked at why semantics is important for search engine optimization, how to research semantic keywords on Google, how to create a Semantic Map for your web site content and how to structure your web site linking for semantic relevance.

Now it’s time to take a look at on-page content and the best tips and techniques to organize individual pages for semantic relevance.

Read more

Semantic Web Impact On Enterprise Software: Part 2

Enterprise.png

This is the final market we look at in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series.

In Part 1, we looked at the overall market for enterprise software to see where semantic web technology could fit. The basic conclusion: it is part of the data integration business.

In this post we dive a bit deeper into the types of opportunity for semantic web vendors and how they can position to win a big share of the $229 billion enterprise software market.
Enterprise.png

This is the final market we look at in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series.

In Part 1, we looked at the overall market for enterprise software to see where semantic web technology could fit. The basic conclusion: it is part of the data integration business.

In this post we dive a bit deeper into the types of opportunity for semantic web vendors and how they can position to win a big share of the $229 billion enterprise software market.

Read more

Semantic Web Impact On Enterprise Software: Part 1

Enterprise.png

This is the final market we look at in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series.

Enterprise software is a huge market – $222.6 billion in 2009 according to Gartner. Put that in perspective. The online advertising market in the USA is only $50 billion. Even assuming the global online ad market is 2x the US market, enterprise software is 2x online advertising.

That $50 billion online ad market has come from nowhere in the 15 years since the start of the web. That is why online advertising has been the fun growth market in the last decade.

And most VCs have shunned the enterprise market in that same decade. They have had two reasons. One is the perception that the enterprise market is locked up by a few giant firms such as SAP, Oracle and IBM; actually they dominate their market far, far less than Google dominates online advertising. The other is that the cost of sale is too high; that remains true in most cases.

That lack of VC attention is a blessing for entrepreneurs! The market is less crowded. And customers do want innovation. They do not want to be reliant on a few large vendors; they know that these vendors will exploit that position at the customer’s expense.

Even a small slice of the enterprise software market is big. Most VC want an addressable market that is $500m. There should be plenty of $500m niches within that $229 billion! And a bootstrapped entrepreneur does not even have to get that big a market; they could get a very healthy $10m business in a tiny $50m market.

And enterprise softwate is a market where ventures have historically not needed a lot of capital. Most of the current giants were bootstrapped.

So, at the macro level, enterprise software is a good place to be. But start-ups don’t live or die at the macro level. They live or die by having a stunningly strong value proposition to overcome the corporate risk aversion. Think 10x. You have to be better, faster, cheaper by 10x orders of magnitude. That is the only way to get cost of sales to a reasonable level – or even to get to the point where you worry about cost of sales!

The question is, can Semantic Web technology have a 10x scale impact on enterprise software?

Image courtesy Flickr and BirdOfTheGalaxy.
Enterprise.png

This is the final market we look at in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series.

Enterprise software is a huge market – $222.6 billion in 2009 according to Gartner. Put that in perspective. The online advertising market in the USA is only $50 billion. Even assuming the global online ad market is 2x the US market, enterprise software is 2x online advertising.

That $50 billion online ad market has come from nowhere in the 15 years since the start of the web. That is why online advertising has been the fun growth market in the last decade.

And most VCs have shunned the enterprise market in that same decade. They have had two reasons. One is the perception that the enterprise market is locked up by a few giant firms such as SAP, Oracle and IBM; actually they dominate their market far, far less than Google dominates online advertising. The other is that the cost of sale is too high; that remains true in most cases.

That lack of VC attention is a blessing for entrepreneurs! The market is less crowded. And customers do want innovation. They do not want to be reliant on a few large vendors; they know that these vendors will exploit that position at the customer’s expense.

Even a small slice of the enterprise software market is big. Most VC want an addressable market that is $500m. There should be plenty of $500m niches within that $229 billion! And a bootstrapped entrepreneur does not even have to get that big a market; they could get a very healthy $10m business in a tiny $50m market.

And enterprise softwate is a market where ventures have historically not needed a lot of capital. Most of the current giants were bootstrapped.

So, at the macro level, enterprise software is a good place to be. But start-ups don’t live or die at the macro level. They live or die by having a stunningly strong value proposition to overcome the corporate risk aversion. Think 10x. You have to be better, faster, cheaper by 10x orders of magnitude. That is the only way to get cost of sales to a reasonable level – or even to get to the point where you worry about cost of sales!

The question is, can Semantic Web technology have a 10x scale impact on enterprise software?

Image courtesy Flickr and BirdOfTheGalaxy.

Read more

Semantic Web For Healthcare: Part 4: Kyield & The Health Graph

HealthGraph.png

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In Part 2 we drilled into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology.

In Part 3 we looked at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms

In this final Part 4, we look at how all the participants in the “health graph” can start to work around a common set of data standards in what may be the first glimpse of 21st century healthcare.

In our first post on Healthcare we wrote:

“Attempting to know enough about how to combat a nasty long term disease is hard enough. It is much harder when you are facing the emotional and physical trauma of the disease itself.
The subject itself is complex. But even greater complexity comes from the overlapping and contradictory knowledge frameworks of the different participants:

• Patient and the close relatives/friends who are advocates and caregivers

• The trusted General Practitioner who really knows the patient but is not a specialist in the disease.

• Many specialists. What is exciting about medical advances today is the cross-disciplinary cooperation. The breakthrough may come from outside the mainstream. But each specialist has their own framework for looking at the problem.

• The Pharma companies who have drugs that are already FDA approved and others in the pipeline where they want patients for clinical trials.

• Academic and scientific researchers.

Of course the patient has to be the center of this “health graph”. Their framework is the one that matters in the end.”

The answer of course is the fabled Electronic Health Record (EHR). I say “fabled” as this has been forecast by people for a looooong time. Cynics might write it off. They would be wrong. Technologies that take a long time to come to the mainstream sometimes do so just after their demise has been declared by “sensible” folks.

What caught our eye was a case study related to Diabetes – a current “scourge” in America and other countries. So we decided to focus this post on that case study and the product behind it. This may point the way to what we are calling the “health graph”.

HealthGraph.png

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In Part 2 we drilled into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology.

In Part 3 we looked at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms

In this final Part 4, we look at how all the participants in the “health graph” can start to work around a common set of data standards in what may be the first glimpse of 21st century healthcare.

In our first post on Healthcare we wrote:

“Attempting to know enough about how to combat a nasty long term disease is hard enough. It is much harder when you are facing the emotional and physical trauma of the disease itself.
The subject itself is complex. But even greater complexity comes from the overlapping and contradictory knowledge frameworks of the different participants:

• Patient and the close relatives/friends who are advocates and caregivers

• The trusted General Practitioner who really knows the patient but is not a specialist in the disease.

• Many specialists. What is exciting about medical advances today is the cross-disciplinary cooperation. The breakthrough may come from outside the mainstream. But each specialist has their own framework for looking at the problem.

• The Pharma companies who have drugs that are already FDA approved and others in the pipeline where they want patients for clinical trials.

• Academic and scientific researchers.

Of course the patient has to be the center of this “health graph”. Their framework is the one that matters in the end.”

The answer of course is the fabled Electronic Health Record (EHR). I say “fabled” as this has been forecast by people for a looooong time. Cynics might write it off. They would be wrong. Technologies that take a long time to come to the mainstream sometimes do so just after their demise has been declared by “sensible” folks.

What caught our eye was a case study related to Diabetes – a current “scourge” in America and other countries. So we decided to focus this post on that case study and the product behind it. This may point the way to what we are calling the “health graph”.

Read more

Semantic Web For Healthcare: Part 3, R&D From Bench To Bedside

MadScientist.png

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In Part 2 we drilled into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology.

In this post, Part 3, we look at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms

In the final Part 4, we will look at how all the participants in the “health graph” can start to work around a common set of data standards in what may be the first glimpse of 21st century healthcare.

Bio/Pharma may be the first enterprise software market where semantic web technology breaks into the mainstream. So this is interesting as a pointer to what will be the final 10th market in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series – enterprise software.
MadScientist.png

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In Part 2 we drilled into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology.

In this post, Part 3, we look at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms

In the final Part 4, we will look at how all the participants in the “health graph” can start to work around a common set of data standards in what may be the first glimpse of 21st century healthcare.

Bio/Pharma may be the first enterprise software market where semantic web technology breaks into the mainstream. So this is interesting as a pointer to what will be the final 10th market in our Creative Destruction 7 Act Play series – enterprise software.

Read more

Semantic Web For Healthcare: Part 2, Innovation For Consumers

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In this Part 2 we drill into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology. In Part 3 we will look at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms.

This is part of our Creative Destruction 7 Act play series. The market we are currently focused on is Healthcare. In Part 1 we looked at the big picture. In this Part 2 we drill into consumer health sites that are leveraging semantic web technology. In Part 3 we will look at innovation in the enterprise space, how semantic web technology is being used by researchers in pharma and biotech firms.

Read more

Semantic eCommerce: Will Twitter Connect The Dots Between EarlyBird And Annotations?

ConnectDots.png

Twitter has announced how they plan to make money. It does not look like one silver bullet. There is nothing like Adwords that propelled Google to IPO. Twitter has a number of initiatives. That feels a bit weak, hedging bets, not quite sure what will work. But time will tell and Twitter has been marvelous at making doubters eat their words.

Our theory is that online advertising and ecommerce are converging (for reasons explored in this post).

Facebook is clearly moving down the ecommerce track. They are using Like to hoover up recommendations from across the web, understanding that recommendations are the key to ecommerce.

While Facebook clearly has its ecommerce act together, Twitter still seems to be figuring it out. @EarlyBird seems to be the key to their ecommerce strategy. We wrote earlier that:

“Real Time changes the rules. With real time you allow for both “freshness premium” (buy now, the fish has just been caught/the dress is just off the runway/the band has just releases the song) as well as “staleness discounts” (the fish is still edible but a bit old, the clothes are functional but no longer fashionable).”

But real time ecommerce will need a semantic engine. That means Twitter Annotations. How will Twitter connect these two dots – EarlyBird and Annotations?

Image courtesy Flickr and Kooby.
ConnectDots.png

Twitter has announced how they plan to make money. It does not look like one silver bullet. There is nothing like Adwords that propelled Google to IPO. Twitter has a number of initiatives. That feels a bit weak, hedging bets, not quite sure what will work. But time will tell and Twitter has been marvelous at making doubters eat their words.

Our theory is that online advertising and ecommerce are converging (for reasons explored in this post).

Facebook is clearly moving down the ecommerce track. They are using Like to hoover up recommendations from across the web, understanding that recommendations are the key to ecommerce.

While Facebook clearly has its ecommerce act together, Twitter still seems to be figuring it out. @EarlyBird seems to be the key to their ecommerce strategy. We wrote earlier that:

“Real Time changes the rules. With real time you allow for both “freshness premium” (buy now, the fish has just been caught/the dress is just off the runway/the band has just releases the song) as well as “staleness discounts” (the fish is still edible but a bit old, the clothes are functional but no longer fashionable).”

But real time ecommerce will need a semantic engine. That means Twitter Annotations. How will Twitter connect these two dots – EarlyBird and Annotations?

Image courtesy Flickr and Kooby.

Read more

How To Structure Your Web Site Linking For Semantic Relevance

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Four in a Six Part Series. Here are Parts 1 and 2 and 3.

Semantics is powerful in the organization of content for a web site. It provides for better user interaction across the site, and gives search engines like Google additional clues for their crawlers to determine what your web sites content is really about.

From a traffic perspective, good semantic organization provides automatic optimization of your site content and delivers higher rankings in search engine placements for both your core search terms and many long-tail searches that you otherwise would not rank for. Let’s start by examining some good examples of this approach that have led to Link 1 Rankings on Google for the websites in question.

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Four in a Six Part Series. Here are Parts 1 and 2 and 3.

Semantics is powerful in the organization of content for a web site. It provides for better user interaction across the site, and gives search engines like Google additional clues for their crawlers to determine what your web sites content is really about.

From a traffic perspective, good semantic organization provides automatic optimization of your site content and delivers higher rankings in search engine placements for both your core search terms and many long-tail searches that you otherwise would not rank for. Let’s start by examining some good examples of this approach that have led to Link 1 Rankings on Google for the websites in question.

Read more

How To Create A Semantic Map For Your Web Site Content

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Three in a Six Part Series. Here Parts 1 and 2.

Semantic Maps can be very useful in defining the words and phrases that can increase the semantic relevance of your web site content. Semantic Mapping is a combination of data discovery and a visual representation of that data to show the keywords and phrases that have direct relationships to your target search term. Direct relationships are key to Google Semantics since Google applies a higher ranking factor to those relationships than to more distant ones.

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Three in a Six Part Series. Here Parts 1 and 2.

Semantic Maps can be very useful in defining the words and phrases that can increase the semantic relevance of your web site content. Semantic Mapping is a combination of data discovery and a visual representation of that data to show the keywords and phrases that have direct relationships to your target search term. Direct relationships are key to Google Semantics since Google applies a higher ranking factor to those relationships than to more distant ones.

Read more

How to Research Semantic Keywords on Google

SEOMagic.png

This is Part Two in a Six Part Series.

Semantic Analysis is the new frontier for search engine relevance, ever since premier search engines like Google and Bing began using synonyms to understand the content of web site pages. Some 70% of search queries on Google now involve the use of synonyms, therefore knowing how to research semantic keywords that have direct relevance to your web site is critical to increasing your page relevance and improving search engine rankings for your targeted search terms.
SEOMagic.png

This is Part Two in a Six Part Series.

Semantic Analysis is the new frontier for search engine relevance, ever since premier search engines like Google and Bing began using synonyms to understand the content of web site pages. Some 70% of search queries on Google now involve the use of synonyms, therefore knowing how to research semantic keywords that have direct relevance to your web site is critical to increasing your page relevance and improving search engine rankings for your targeted search terms.

Read more

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