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Last week, David Amerland of Forbes wrote, “At the heart of the semantic Web is connectivity. The key is the ability of one set of data to be connected to a different set of data—with fresh meaning arising from the connection. If that sounds like a souped-up version of the word-association game, you might ask, ‘So what?’ The value lies in the clarity of the picture that emerges… Consider that the BYOD trend that’s underway requires the development of trust inside the organization. Trust is needed not just as part of the natural evolution of the internal structure of the enterprise, but also for it to respond better and faster to marketplace events that can wrong-foot it. In other words, no business can expect to survive if it remains the same.”

 

Amerland continues, “The path that takes the modern business there is created by data. Burberry and Caesars, for example, use big data to personalize the customer experience, creating a seamless environment that includes both the online and offline space. The results are satisfied, loyal customers and higher profits. Whether we’re talking about Web search marketing or an implementation of big-data models, the end result is the same to a business: A method turns the jumbled noise of data into a signal, at the point where a potential customer wants to do business with a company. The meaningful relationship between a business and its prospects is the Holy Grail of the 21st-century enterprise. It’s the point at which what a business does is transformed from a transactional exchange to an experiential one. And at which those experiences deliver value to the end-users that goes above and beyond the price tag. This is the nature of the semantic Web, where everything is interconnected, and all activity is visible.”

 

Read more here.

 

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ ShieldConnectors