John Kaye of the British Library recently shared his views on what open data and academia have to learn from one another. He writes, “Professor Nigel Shadbolt recently visited the Library to talk to staff about the benefits of releasing public data into the wild. He didn’t need to convince me, being a public sector researcher prior to joining the library I fought many licensing and cost battles to get my hands on the data needed for my research projects. This blog isn’t about making the case for opening up public data as this has been made many times and yielded numerous important benefits. Having worked in creating, using and disseminating both public and academic data I think that there are tools and methodologies that both areas can learn from each other.”

He goes on, “Due to policies like the Research Excellence Framework there is a big focus in academia to develop methods to measure the impact of research funded and undertaken and to promote the re-use of data created in this research. Tools like impactstory that allow researchers to gauge the impact of their research outputs are already being created using open infrastructure being supported by the British Library and our partners in science and publishing.”

Read more here.

Image: Courtesy British Library