Artificial Intelligence

Researchers Create First Image-Recognition Software that Greatly Improves Web Searches

DartmouthHANOVER, N.H. – Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues have created an artificial intelligence software that uses photos to locate documents on the Internet with far greater accuracy than ever before.

The new system, which was tested on photos and is now being applied to videos, shows for the first time that a machine learning algorithm for image recognition and retrieval is accurate and efficient enough to improve large-scale document searches online. The system uses pixel data in images and potentially video – rather than just text — to locate documents. It learns to recognize the pixels associated with a search phrase by studying the results from text-based image search engines. Read more

Google Researchers Use End-to-End Neural Network To Caption Pictures

pizzaGoogle researchers have announced the development of a machine-learning system that can automatically produce captions to accurately describe images in properly formed sentences the first time it sees them.

“This kind of system could eventually help visually impaired people understand pictures, provide alternate text for images in parts of the world where mobile connections are slow, and make it easier for everyone to search on Google for images,” report research Scientists Oriol Vinyals, Alexander Toshev, Samy Bengio, and Dumitru Erhan in a blog about how they’re building a neural image caption generator.

Getting there, the researchers say, involved merging recent computer vision and language models into a single jointly trained system that can directly produce a human readable sequence of words to describe a given image. The task is no easy one, they point out, explaining that unlike image classification or object recognition on its own, their work has to account not only for the objects contained in the image, but also for expressing how these objects relate to each other, as well as their attributes and the activities they are involved in.

The approach leverages an end- to-end neural network that can automatically view an image and generate a plan English description of it.

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Making Work Easier with Artificial Intelligence

relateiqBastiaan Janmaat of DataFox recently wrote for VentureBeat, “Prior to starting DataFox, two of our founders worked in the investment banking industry; one of us in mergers and acquisitions, the other in growth equity… Throughout the day, I read a total of 10-30 newsletters, updates, and alerts. I spent a total of two to three hours consuming and syndicating just a few key insights. If visiting the library for research is laughably inefficient nowadays, consuming corporate information the way I did was almost as ridiculous.”

He continues, “Fortunately, technologists are working to solve this problem. Innovative companies are leveraging artificial intelligence (including natural language processing and supervised machine learning) to collect information from disparate sources, organize that information, and disseminate it to the right people at the right time. Read more

Halloween Scares Of Another Variety

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

What could be scarier than a haunted house on Halloween, packed with ghouls, axe murderers and the standard array of blood and guts?

Well, maybe the real fright night lies with technology. Consider the following scares that might just send Michael Myers himself into a terror tizzy:

  • Artificial intelligence. Tesla, Paypal and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, as reported in this article in Mashable, recently told an audience at MIT’s Centennial Symposium that, “With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon.” Musk said to attendees that he probably ranks AI as our biggest existential threat, commenting that, “In all those stories where there’s the guy with the pentagram and the holy water, it’s like, ‘Yeah, he’s sure he can control the demon.’ Doesn’t work out.”

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Google Partners with Oxford on NLP and Image Recognition Research

deepmindBen Woods of The Next Web reports, “Google has joined forces with the University of Oxford in the UK in order to better study the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) in the areas of image recognition and natural language processing. The hope is that by joining forces with an esteemed academic institution, the research will progress more rapidly than going it alone for its DeepMind project. In total, Google has hired seven individuals (who also happen to be world experts in deep learning for natural language understanding), three of which will remain as professors holding joint appointments at Oxford University.” Read more

Artificial Intelligence Expert David Levy on ‘Love and Sex with Robots’

rachelJacob James of Newsweek recently discussed artificial intelligence expert David Levy’s thoughts on combining natural language processing with sex dolls, and what doing so might mean for society. James writes, “It was while researching his 2003 book, Robots Unlimited, that [Levy] first became interested in the subject. Specifically, he read a quote from a 1984 book by Sherry Turkel… An interviewee, ‘Anthony’, told Turkel that he had tried having girlfriends but preferred his relationship with his computer. ‘That quotation hit me like a brick wall,’ says Levy. ‘I thought – if a smart guy could think like that in 1984, I wonder how much the concept of human-computer emotional relationships has developed since then’.” Read more

How Andrew Ng is Monetizing Deep Learning at Baidu

Baidu logoCade Metz of Wired recently wrote, “Deep learning can do many things. Tapping the power of hundreds or even thousands of computers, this new breed of artificial intelligence can help Facebook recognize people, words, and objects that appear in digital photos. It can help Google understand what you’re saying when you bark commands into an Android phone. And it can help Baidu boost the bottom line. The Chinese web giant now uses deep learning to target ads on its online services, and according to Andrew Ng—who helped launch the deep learning operation at Google and now oversees research and development at Baidu—the company has seen a notable increase in revenue as a result. ‘It’s used very successfully in advertising,’ he says, sitting inside the company’s U.S. R&D center in Sunnyvale, California. ‘We have not released revenue numbers on the specific impact, but it is significant’.” Read more

Red Lamba’s AI-Enabled Security Solution Stands Up To Operational Data Volume And Velocity Challenge

RLRed Lambda, a company spun out of the University of Florida, late last month was recognized by The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA)’s NextGen program for providing the most innovative security solution. SIIA cited its advances in supercomputing, relational stream processing and artificial intelligence as part of its integrated MetaGrid platform and analytics capabilities as highlights for protecting enterprise data.

The rules approach taken by many antivirus and security information management solutions to root out threats based on what was learned in past breaches has its place. But “Red Lambda wants to identify activity and patterns of activity that can be seen as a breach or potential breach,” says company CTO Dan Nieten.

“One of the things neural networking is very useful for is for deep learning and also dealing with unknowns, and cyber-security world is a world where you have to deal with a lot of unknowns.” To battle threats that get past the first lines of defense, more attention is starting to be paid “to use AI, to apply statistical and machine learning methods in the area of security, to identify breaches,” says Nieten, whose own background is in NLP and machine learning. Read more

Could “Amelia” Start Filling Low-Level Jobs?

Amelia_3053068bSophie Curtis of The Telegraph reports, “Today a new artificial intelligence computing system has been unveiled, which promises to transform the global workforce. Named ‘Amelia’ after American aviator and pioneer Amelia Earhart, the system is able to shoulder the burden of often tedious and laborious tasks, allowing human co-workers to take on more creative roles. ‘Watson is perhaps the best data analytics engine that exists on the planet; it is the best search engine that exists on the planet; but IBM did not set out to create a cognitive agent. Read more

What You Can Expect From Windows 9

cortana304x200Dave Altavilla of Forbes reports, “Microsoft has a big opportunity tomorrow when they unveil the next version of Windows known by the code name ‘Threshold’ and what could ultimately be dubbed Windows 9. Though its official name has yet to be confirmed, Microsoft is holding an event tomorrow in San Francisco and the unveil invitations sent out hint at ‘what’s next for Windows.’ Lately there have been a flurry of reports and leaks of what is widely known as Windows 9, though there is still some buzz that Microsoft may brand the OS by a different name upon launch. Regardless, here are a few key highlights on what I think we’ll see the Redmond team unveil with this new OS, which is expected to cure the many ills users have been complaining of with Windows 8.” Read more

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