Social Media Semantics

Facebook Messenger, The Internet of Things, and Your Privacy

messengerDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “Over the last month there has been an unfathomable amount of content published about the massive privacy intrusion that is Facebook Messenger. With the ability to intrude into the lives of its users in ways that the NSA would never think to, it isn’t a surprise that the new download brought such strong opinions; many of which served as recommendations to not download the application. The good news about the widespread dialogue on messenger is that it brought to light the issues that surround privacy of data. Further implicating what some of us have always known. “When the service is free, the user is the product.” Make sense? In other words, when companies like Facebook create applications that we use in our everyday lives, for free, the real price is in what we sacrifice for the right to use the application for free, our data.” Read more

Blab Builds The Conversation Graph

blab2We have the Knowledge Graph, the Enterprise Graph, the Researcher Graph, the Supply Chain Graph – and now, the Conversation Graph, too

That’s how Blab characterizes the work it’s doing to add structure to the chaotic world of online conversation, normalizing and patterning the world’s discussions across 50,000 social network, news outlet, blog, video and other channels, regardless of language – to the tune of some hundred million posts per day and 1 million predictions per minute. Near realtime predictions, says CEO Randy Browning, of what a target audience will be interested in a 72-hour forward-looking window based on what they’re talking about now, so that customers can tailor their buying strategies for AdWords or search terms as well as create or deploy content that’s relevant to those interests.

“We predict what will be important to people so they can buy search terms or AdWords at a great price before the market or Google sees it,” he says. That’s the main reason customers turn to Blab today, with optimizing their own content taking second place. Crisis management is the third deployment rationale. “If a brand has multiple issues, we can tell them which will be significant or which will be a blip and then fade away, so they can get a predictive understanding of where to focus their resources to mitigate issues coming down the pike.

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Google Acquires Emu, a Messaging & Personal Assistant App

emuMark Langshaw of Digital Spy reports, “Google has acquired the company behind Emu, a messaging app that doubles as a personal assistant. The existing application, which was for iPhone only, will be pulled from the App Store later this month.’As of August 25, 2014, we’ll be shutting down the Emu app. It will no longer be available in the App Store, and existing users won’t be able to send, receive, or download messages. We know it’s an inconvenience, and we regret that,’ said the firm in a statement. Emu uses intelligent learning and natural language processing to present the user with relevant information in real-time, and can be integrated with other services.” Read more

Deep Learning Startup Madbits Acquired by Twitter

MADBITSDerrick Harris of GigaOM reports, “Twitter has acquired a stealthy computer vision startup called Madbits, which was founded by former New York University researchers. Clément Farabet and Louis-Alexandre Etezad-Heydari. Farabet is a protégé of Facebook AI Lab director and New York University professor Yann LeCun, while Etezad-Heydari was advised by Larry Maloney and Eero Simoncelli.” Read more

University of Sydney Working on NLP Social Media Tools for Suicide Prevention

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Leon Spencer of ZDnet reports, “Social media psychotherapy could be the next big thing in the field of mental health management if the development of a new internet-based tool called CyberMate by the University of Sydney gets off the ground. According to the university, the team behind the CyberMate project will adapt online tracking techniques used by marketing analysts, along with digital social media and internet data to support interventions for young people affected by depression and other mental health issues. The researchers working on the project aim to design algorithms that will give the online tool the ability to screen a young person’s social networking pages such as Facebook or Twitter for comments that may indicate potential self-harm. CyberMate would then act as a quasi-psychotherapist and engage with the young online user, suggesting options for help or support via email or SMS.” Read more

Wavii Founder Leaves Google One Year After Acquisition

wavii logoAlexia Tsotsis of TechCrunch reports, “Lots of Google executives are at the Re/Code Code conference in Rancho Palos Verdes this week. But at least one of them won’t be a Google executive for very much longer. Wavii founder Adrian Aoun is leaving the search company, a little more than a year after the $30 million acquisition of his content aggregation startup, in order to start a second company. It is unclear whether he left money on the table.” Read more

Major Updates on State iPhone App Help People to Connect Globally

Major Updates on State iPhone App Help People to Connect Globally and to Explore All Points of View

LONDON, May 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — State launched a major mobile app update for iPhone today that makes it easier for anyone to quickly State their opinions, get them counted and connect with others around the world who share their views. The app features a new world map that shows global conversation unfolding in real-time for each topic, plotting clusters of like-minded people and instantly uniting them around issues they care about.

 

Often only the most popular, least tolerant or loudest get heard. Commenting online is unsatisfying. Conversations are dominated by a handful of extremists or a single point of view. No collective wisdom emerges. Connections are even harder to come by. State’s iPhone app, now available to download in the App Store, changes that dynamic. Read more

Gnip Acquired by Twitter

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Twitter has acquired Gnip, a social data provider that we have covered in the past. According to Chris Moody of Gnip, “Combining forces with Twitter allows us to go much faster and much deeper. We’ll be able to support a broader set of use cases across a diverse set of users including brands, universities, agencies, and developers big and small. Joining Twitter also provides us access to resources and infrastructure to scale to the next level and offer new products and solutions. This acquisition signals clear recognition that investments in social data are healthier than ever. Our customers can continue to build and innovate on one of the world’s largest and most trusted providers of social data and the foundation for innovation is now even stronger. We will continue to serve you with the best data products available and will be introducing new offerings with Twitter to better meet your needs and help you continue to deliver truly innovative solutions.” Read more

Twitris Measures Sentiment About Indian Elections

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Oneindia News recently shared a new case study of how Twitris was used to measure sentiment about the current elections in India. The article begins, “Based on 900,000 tweets collected from 15 states about three major political parties (BJP, Congress and AAP), our analysis shows how people talked about and reacted to each political party. Using Twitris, their Collective Social Intelligence platform, the researchers at the Ohio Center of Excellence in Knowledge-enabled Computing (Kno.e.sis) at Wright State University processed each tweet to compute sentiment about the mentioned political party. One parameter to measure popularity is to check which political party gets most positive sentiment or least negative sentiment. Just counting negative (or positive) sentiments on a politician provides, as in this Deccan Herald story, provides little useful information about the state of electorate.” Read more

Google, Facebook, and the Cold War

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Ron Callari of Inventor Spot recently wrote, “It’s hard to say, looking twenty to thirty years into the future, just how different the digital landscape will look. Semantic Technology, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Web 3.0 are presently only toddling along in their infant stage. What they will look like in the next few decades is only guesswork on our part.  However if we were pressed to gamble on the outcome, a smart man’s wager might be that the last two digital super powers left standing will be Google and Facebook [with the possible exception of China]. A CNN Money report describes this evolution as analogous to the ‘Cold War,’ to conjure up imagery of what transpired between America and the Soviet Union, post World War II.” Read more

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