Elevator Pitch

SemWebRox Community Challenge: Results

#SemWebRox ResultsThanks everyone for participating in the #SemWebRox Community Challenge!

Looking at the results (which have been pasted at the end of this article for convenience), I’m struck once again by the diversity of points of view in the Semantic Web community on what the key value of its technology really is. Over at Semantic University we summarized what we believe to be the two dominant camps (summary: AI-centric and flexible data management-centric) in the Semantic Web world, and the results of this exercise illustrate clearly that there are many nuances within those camps.

I’ll go into some highlights, but I think the why is still missing in many cases.  It’s the classic features-not-value predicament that plagues technologists and frustrates technology marketers.  We’re doing better, but we can and must do better still.

Data Flexibility: Data Integration

In terms of data flexibility, there are a number of themes that kept popping up.  Aaron Bradley first called out “cheaper enterprise data integration, and Lee Feigenbaum concurred by stating, “The Semantic Web is the only scalable approach for integrating diverse data.”  Another one I liked about data integration was from Abir: “Semantic Web technologies can make it possible to have true bottom-up web-scale automatic information integration.”

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Community Challenge: The Semantic Web in 140 Characters

Community Challenge: Semantic Web in 140 CharactersAs a community, we Semantic Webbers have done a poor job communicating our value clearly and concisely.

Last week, I stated the case in more detail at the Enterprise Semantics Blog, and Aaron Bradley continued it over at Google Plus (here and here).

Today, I bring you a challenge.

Describe a value of the Semantic Web clearly in 140 characters. Tweet it with the hashtag #SemWebRox.

Why a value and not the value? Because different people have different opinions on what the most important facet of the Semantic Web is. And since you can’t have more than one most important value, just stick to one, and make it convincing.

Why 140 characters? It’s not just Twitter. Restricting space in this way forces you to get the core of your argument. No elaboration. No amendments. Straight value.

Here is my attempt:

Write yours here or tweet it directly. We’ll aggregate them and include in a future post!

“Top Semantic Start-Up” Contenders Announced!

We are pleased to announce the start-ups that have been selected to participate in the 2012 SemTechBiz “Top Semantic Start-Up” competition. These companies will give demonstrations/pitches before a panel of expert judges at the Semantic Technology and Business Conference June 3-7.

Judges

Photo of Phil Aucutt Photo of Michael Dunn, CTO, Hearst Interactive Photo of Jim Hendler, Professor, RPI Photo of Mark Johnson, CEO Zite Photo of Chris Shipley, CEO Guidewire Group

Our panel of judges includes (Left to Right): Phil Aucutt, CEO, TeamPatent; Mike Dunn, CTO, Hearst Interactive; James Hendler, Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Mark Johnson, CEO, Zite; Chris Shipley, CEO, Guidewire Group (former Executive Director, DEMO Conference)

The Envelope Please!

The companies, presentations, and speakers for the start-up competition are…

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#SemTechBiz Start-Up Contest – Deadline Extension and Judges Announced

Semantic Tech & Business Conference - San Francisco - Start-up Competition. Click Here to Apply!SemanticWeb.com and parent company WebMediaBrands recently announced a contest to earn the title of  “Top Semantic Technology Start-Up.” Today, we have two exciting announcements to make about the contest.

Deadline Extension

We have had several requests to extend the deadline, and are announcing today that we will now accept applications for the contest until April 30, 2012. We also learned of some applicants who encountered technical problems when trying to submit in the early days of the contest. We have fixed the code that caused these problems, and encourage all who experienced difficulties to try again.

Judges

We are also pleased to announce the panel of judges that will be at SemTechBiz evaluating the companies. It’s a great group, and we’re looking forward to a lively afternoon!

Photo of Michael Dunn, CTO, Hearst Interactive Photo of Jim Hendler, Professor, RPI Photo of Mark Johnson, CEO Zite Photo of Chris Shipley, CEO Guidewire Group

Left to Right, they are: Read more

#SemTechBiz Start-up Contest – 3 Weeks Left to Enter!

Semantic Tech & Business Conference - San Francisco - Start-up Competition. Click Here to Apply!SemanticWeb.com and parent company WebMediaBrands recently announced that a competition will be held at the upcoming Semantic Technology and Business Conference (SemTechBiz) in San Francisco to select the “Top Semantic Technology Start-Up.” The contest begins with an online application process. Out of that pool of applicants, ten companies will be selected to compete in person and on stage at SemTechBiz San Francisco. There is no charge to apply. The ten finalist companies will need to register one individual, but for already registered attendees, there is no additional fee.

Requirements

SemanticWeb.com is currently accepting entrants from now until April 23, 2012. Companies encouraged to apply are those who meet the following conditions:

  1. have a demonstrable product (at least in “beta” stage) in the SemTech and or SemWeb space
  2. have received no more than a Series A round of financing

Companies can be located anywhere but must have the financial means to attend SemTech 2012. Ten Finalist companies will be selected to compete in a “Pitch Slam” before a panel of expert judges at the Conference. These finalists will be listed in an article at SemanticWeb.com.

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Summer School – Excecutive Briefing on Linked Data

Summer can be a great time to learn something new, and SemanticWeb.com is always on the lookout for new ways of explaining the terms, techniques, standards, and technologies involved in the world of Semantic Web. We were thrilled, then, to see this much-needed executive briefing on Linked Data from our colleagues at 3 Round Stones:

Please share this video with anyone you think would benefit, leave a comment below, and check out some of these other resources:

 

Coming Soon, to a Newsroom Near You

We recently have given coverage to the new rNews standard from the IPTC, but two things today caught our eye:

First, from Beet.tv, a brief video from Mike Dunn, VP and CTO of Hearst Interactive. The video serves as an introduction to the value of rNews in the media industry, and does that well.  That said, I think it could also be used as an elevator pitch for publishing decision-makers who are considering implementing rNews, RDFa, or more generally, Semantic Technologies.  Mike indicates that Hearst is currently evaluating rNews.

The video can be seen here:

NOTE: Mike Dunn will be speaking at SemTech 2011, where there will also be a presentation on the rNews standard. Read more

Defining the Semantic Web in a Few Sentences

A Quora user posed this challenge to the network: “How do you explain semantic web to a nine-year old child in one sentence?” The challenge was followed by a quote from Albert Einstein: “If you can’t explain it to a six year old, you don’t understand it yourself.”

Some of the best responses so far include, “A web where computers better understand the real meaning of the words we use to communicate with them.” “Hi Timmy, the web is like one giant big book written by a lot of people. And the semantic web is another book describing how the first book should be read.” And, “Semantic web is like the magic mirror in Shrek – you ask it, ‘Can I go to a pool?’ and it tells you, ‘Yes, you can, because the weather is good and the pool you like to go to is open.’”

We at Semantic Web recently offered up a challenge of our own: give us your best elevator pitch answering the question, “What is the Semantic Web?” We’ve received some great pitches so far (listed below) and we’re still accepting new pitches.

Sandro Hawke, W3C – for a general audience

David Wood, Talis – for journalistic research

Mark Montgomery, Kyield – for enterprise decision makers

Gordon Brown, UK Prime Minister (not an official pitch) – for government and citizenry

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ ricardodiaz11

Semantic Web Elevator Pitch for… Government and Citizenry?

Last year, former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown gave a 90-second elevator pitch for the Semantic Web.  Granted, it started about four minutes into a 32-minute long speech. This speech, given March 22, 2010, was long before our original challenge went out, but this discovery was simply too fun to not include it here. Obviously, it was not an official submission.

The Pitch


We are still collecting elevator pitches from our readers in an attempt to answer the question “What is the Semantic Web?” If you think you have a pitch in you, check out the original challenge.

Thanks to Bernadette Hyland, CEO of Talis, Inc., and regular participant in the SemanticLink podcasts for finding and sharing this!

Semantic Web Elevator Pitch for: Journalistic Research

David Wood of Talis, Inc., submitted this elevator pitch. I particularly like how he used an elevator both as setting and example (of a closed system).

We are collecting these from our readers in an attempt to answer the question “What is the Semantic Web?” If you think you have a pitch in you, check out the original challenge.

Thanks David!

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