Enterprise Semantics

Cambridge Semantics Launches ‘Anzo Smart Data Integration’

Anzo Smart Data Integration (ASDI)

Extract,  Transform, and Load (ETL) and the business problem ETL solves — Data Integration — are complex to say the least. As the team at Cambridge Semantics points out:

Data integration and data on-boarding are time-consuming, manual, costly & error-prone processes.

  • Complex integrations require developing a large number of point-to-point source-target mappings.
  • Each mapping must be jointly developed by experts in all involved systems before being handed off to a team of ETL developers.
  • Each hand-off increases both the time it takes to complete the integration and also the risk of errors as requirements are misunderstood or not fully validated.
  • The lineage and meaning of data are often lost in the process, limiting the trustworthiness and utility of the data.

 

Cambridge Semantics today announced the launch of its Anzo Smart Data Integration (ASDI) software to help enterprises rapidly understand and integrate information assets. Described as a “design time tool for business analysts,” ASDI is “designed to reduce integration time frames and costs by 10X and enhance time-to-revenue when on-boarding new customers, partners and data,” according to the official announcement.

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RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things

Depiction of RDF and the internet of ThingsDo you still remember a time when a utility company worker came to your house to check your electric meter? For many of us already, this is in the past. Smart meters send information directly to the utility company and as a result, it knows our up-to-the-minute power usage patterns. And, while we don’t yet talk to our ovens or refrigerators through the Internet, many people routinely control thermostats from their smart phones. The emerging Internet of Things is real and we interact with it on the daily basis.

The term Internet of Things refers to devices we wouldn’t traditionally expect to be smart or connected, such as a smoke detector or other home appliance. They are being made ‘smart’ by enabling them to send data to an application. From smart meters to sensors used to track goods in a supply chain, the one thing these devices have in common is that they send data – data that can then be used to create more value by doing things better, faster, cheaper, and more conveniently.

The physical infrastructure needed for these devices to work is largely in place or being put in place quickly. We get immediate first order benefits simply by installing new equipment. For example, having a smart meter provides cost savings because there is no need for a person to come to our houses. Similarly, the ability to change settings on a thermostat remotely can lower our heating costs. However, far vaster changes and benefits are projected or are already beginning to be delivered from inter-connecting the data sent by smart devices:

  • Health: Connecting vital measurements from wearable devices to the vast body of medical information will help to improve our health, fitness and, ultimately, save lives.
  • Communities: Connecting information from embedded devices and sensors will enable more efficient transportation. When a sprinkler system meter understands weather data, it will use water more efficiently. Once utilities start connecting and correlating data from smart meters, they might deliver electricity more efficiently and be more proactive in handling infrastructure problems.
  • Environment: Connecting readings from fields, forests, oceans, and cities about pollution levels, soil moisture, and resource extraction will allow for closer monitoring of problems.
  • Goods and services: Connecting data from sensors and readers installed throughout factories and supply chains will more precisely track materials and speed up and smooth out the manufacture and distribution of goods.

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WEBINAR: Using Semantic Technology to Drive Agile Analytics

Webinar Title: Using Semantic Technology to Drive Agile AnalyticsIn case you missed the outstanding webinar, “Using Semantic Technology to Drive Agile Analytics” delivered earlier this week by David Read and Scott Van Buren of Blue Slate Solutions, the recording and slides are now available (and posted below). The webinar was co-produced by SemanticWeb.com and DATAVERSITY.net and runs for one hour, including a Q&A session with the audience that attended the live broadcast.

The presenters will also deliver a half-day tutorial at the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference: “Integrating Data Using Semantic Technology.” Registration for the conference is now open.

If you watch, please use the comments section below to leave your questions, comments, and ideas for webinars you would like to see in the future.

About the Webinar

How do you accelerate data warehousing to meet the demands of the data-driven economy? Semantic technology provides an agile platform to bring data together, focus on data that matters and ultimately derive a target data model that can be easily extended. This webinar will present a semantically-based data federation case study and highlight the semantic components that facilitate agile data federation in the enterprise.

(Presentation Video and Slides after the jump…)
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Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business (White Paper)

Cognizant White Paper coverWe are pleased to publish a new white paper for free download, “How Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business,” from Thomas Kelly, a Director in Cognizant’s Enterprise Information Management practice.

Kelly’s experience and pragmatic approach to Enterprise Data Management shows through in this paper.  As Kelly posits in the introduction, “To achieve sustainable competitive advantage and facilitate operational agility, organizations must speed the time to business value of newly acquired data assets from months to weeks or days. Semantic technology provides the architectural foundation for getting there.”

Kelly addresses how the pace of business today is increasing while becoming more complex with considerations like big data and mobile. He points out that traditional Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence approaches simply cannot keep up with that pace. The solution he points to is Semantic Technologies, and he covers how they improve on both DW and BI while delivering “Smart Data” integration and analytics.

Download a free copy of the full white paper by filling out the form below:

About the Author

Photo of Thomas KellyThomas Kelly is a Director in Cognizant’s Enterprise Information Management (EIM) Practice and heads its Semantic Technology Center of Excellence, a technology specialty of Cognizant Business Consulting. He has 20 plus years of technology consulting experience in leading data warehousing, business intelligence, and big data projects, focused primarily on the life sciences and healthcare industries.

 

At SemTechBiz: Driving To More Agile Enterprise App Building In Government And The Enterprise

Be Informed, which provides businesses a way to build model-driven semantic applications, unveiled a new partnership and a gratis version of its software for users at the Semantic Technology & Business conference this week.

Integrator partner CACI International is joining with Be Informed to develop Civinformed, a semantic solution as a service in the cloud for government agencies. The cloud service aims to respond to the need for civilian agencies in the U.S. government to cut costs and respond quickly to changes, such as those to come with The Affordable Health Care Act, while also raising citizen service levels, says Dan Latham, Be Informed USA CEO.

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Big Data Means More Than Volume

[NOTE: This guest post is by Peter Haase, Lead Architect for Research and Development, fluid Operations.]

Photo of Peter HaaseIndustry engineers waste a significant amount of time searching for data that they require for their core tasks. When informed about potential problems, diagnosis engineers at Siemens Energy Services, an integrated business unit which runs service centers for power plants, need to access several terabytes of time-stamped sensor data and several gigabytes of event data, including both raw and processed data. These engineers have to respond to about 1,000 service requests per center per year, and end up spending 80% of their time on data gathering alone. What makes this problem even worse is that their data grows at a rate of 30 gigabytes per day. Similarly, at Statoil Exploration, geology and geographic experts spend between 30 and 70% of their time looking for and assessing the quality of some 1,000 terabytes of relational data using diverse schemata and spread over 2,000 tables and multiple individual databases [1]. In such scenarios, it may take several days to formulate the queries that satisfy the information needs of the experts, typically involving the assistance of experienced IT experts who have been working with the database schemata for years.

Siemens and Statoil Exploration are hardly the only companies faced with time-wasting Big Data issues, but the root of these issues is not simply the “big” aspect of their data. The real challenge is finding a way to efficiently and effectively mine data for value and insight, regardless of its volume.

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Part II: At SemTechBiz, Enterprise IT Can Explore Reasons To Go Semantic

We continue our discussion from yesterday of what enterprise IT will learn to love about semantic technologies at the upcoming SemTechBiz conference (the story began here):

Another Score For Data Agility

Looked at from the data warehouse point of view by Thomas Kelly, Practice Director, Enterprise Information Management, for Cognizant Technology Solutions, semantic technology makes it possible to apply Agile development practices to the data warehouse itself. “You can start modeling, work with data, generate analytics and then start tuning based on what you learn,” says Kelly, who will be discussing semantic technology for the data warehousing practitioner at this session. Several semantic technology-based practices can be applied that support iterative, evolutionary improvements with little or no impact to data loading and analytics functions that were built before the refinements were made, he says.

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At SemTechBiz, Enterprise IT Can Explore Reasons To Go Semantic

LOGO: Semantic Technology & Business Conference; June 2-5, 2013, San Francisco, CaliforniaWhy should enterprise IT leaders start steeping themselves in semantic technologies? The answer to that question will become apparent to anyone attending the June Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Francisco, where many sessions will explore the value CIOs and their staffs can gain from going semantic. (You can register for SemTechBiz here.)

Let’s start with the problem of forcing enterprise knowledge workers into rigid procedures to accomplish their activities, the result of having to adhere to flow-charted business processes whose silo’d components are pieced together via fixed integration points. Dave Duggal, co-founder and managing director of EnterpriseWeb LLC, will paint a picture at this session instead of a world of smart, connected business processes to stand up a team of empowered and interactive knowledge workers. Once accorded certain rules-enabled permissions and information access rights, those employees can put their smarts to work “to do their jobs in a goal-oriented way to meet the objectives of the organization,” as Duggal explains it.

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Good-Bye to 2012: A Look Back At The Year In Semantic Tech, Part 1

Courtesy: Flickr/zoetnet

As we close out 2012, we’ve asked some semantic tech experts to give us their take on the year that was. Was Big Data a boon for the semantic web, or is the opportunity to capitalize on the connection still pending? Is structured data on the web not just the future but the present? What sector is taking a strong lead in the semantic web space?

We begin with Part 1, with our experts listed in alphabetical order:

John Breslin, lecturer at NUI Galway, researcher and unit leader at DERI, creator of SIOC, and co-founder of Technology Voice and StreamGlider:
I think the schema.org initiative really gaining community support and a broader range of terms has been fantastic. It’s been great to see an easily understandable set of terms for describing the objects in web pages, but also leveraging the experience of work like GoodRelations rather than ignoring what has gone before. It’s also been encouraging to see the growth of Drupal 7 (which produces RDFa data) in the government sector: Estimates are that 24 percent of .gov CMS sites are now powered by Drupal.

Martin Böhringer, CEO & Co-Founder Hojoki:

For us it was very important to see Jena, our Semantic Web framework, becoming an Apache top-level project in April 2012. We see a lot of development pace in this project recently and see a chance to build an open source Semantic Web foundation which can handle cutting-edge requirements.

Still disappointing is the missing link between Semantic Web and the “cool” technologies and buzzwords. From what we see Semantic Web gives answers to some of the industry’s most challenging problems, but it still doesn’t seem to really find its place in relation to the cloud or big data (Hadoop).

Christine Connors, Chief Ontologist, Knowledgent:

One trend that I have seen is increased interest in the broader spectrum of semantic technologies in the enterprise. Graph stores, NoSQL, schema-less and more flexible systems, ontologies (& ontologists!) and integration with legacy systems. I believe the Big Data movement has had a positive impact on this field. We are hearing more and more about “Big Data Analytics” from our clients, partners and friends. The analytical power brought to bear by the semantic technology stack is sparking curiosity – what is it really? How can these models help me mitigate risk, more accurately predict outcomes, identify hidden intellectual assets, and streamline business processes? Real questions, tough questions: fun challenges!

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Announcing: Best Buy Product Catalog via Semantic Endpoints

Logo for BBYOpenA new resource has been announced on Best Buy’s BBYOpen blog: Metis Alpha. Like Best Buy’s earlier forays into Semantic Web use, this one started with a business problem. As the announcement states: “These days, consumers have a rich variety of products available at their fingertips. A massive product landscape has evolved, but sadly products in this enormous and rich landscape often get flattened to just a price tag. Over time, it seems the product value proposition, variety, descriptions, specifics, and details that make up products have all but disappeared. This presents consumers with a ‘paradox of choice’ where misinformed decisions can lead to poor product selections, and ultimately product returns and customer remorse.”

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