Event News

Speech And Smarts Take To TV Search

rsz_vev1The story below features an interview with Sam Vasisht, CMO of Veveo, who is speaking next week at the Semantic Technology And Business Conference in NYC. You can save $200 when you register for the event before October 2.

A recent focus group report from Veveo, whose semantic technology powers conversational interfaces that enable search on connected devices from TVs to tablets and smart phones to set-top boxes, reveals that three out of four participants are dissatisfied with their existing pay-TV content discovery experience. Reasons include that they are unable to search using keywords; they don’t know how to spell what they were looking for or remember the name of the show they want when entering search terms; it takes too long to scroll through the electronic programming guide; and they don’t see any recommendations that seemed relevant to them.

In an online survey the vendor conducted, it also found that, when users were asked if they would like to use voice or if they’d use if they had it to find content, more than 60 percent said yes, according to CMO Sam Vasisht. “People think there has to be a better way,” he says. “The level of interest and the sense of urgency that companies have about making voice-enabled feature a part of TV is becoming very strong. But just voice commands won’t get you there. You need something above and beyond.”

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Calendars Get Smart With Tempo.AI

semtechnyclogoSRI International, which spearheaded the CALO (Cognitive Agent That Learns and Organizes) intelligent assistant for DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), has had more than one semantic project up its sleeve. One of them was Tempo.AI, which was spun off by SRI at the end of 2011. Earlier this year, the smart calendar app for the iPhone was formally launched, with Thierry Donneau-Golencer as co-founder and AI lead.

Donneau-Golencer, having also worked on CALO, clearly has a strong history of work related to dealing with information and how to make sense of it. “A lot of it had to do with semantic analysis, deriving meaning and useful information from content,” says Donneau-Golencer, with Tempo representing the next step in smart search across content by making the job more proactive.

At October’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC, Donneau-Golencer will share with attendees insights into the role semantic technology has in helping find and correlate information for users, with the least input possible required.

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UPDATE: The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.

[UPDATE: This panel has a new panelist! Mike Arnesen, SEO Team Manager of SwellPath will participate in New York.]

seo-is-dead-long-live-seoOn October 3 at the New York Semantic Technology & Business Conference (#SemTechBiz), a panel of experts will tackle the issue of how Semantic Web technologies are rapidly changing the landscape of Search Engine Optimization. The panel, titled “The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.,” is made up of Aaron Bradley, David Amerland, Barbara Starr, Duane Forrester, and Mike Arnesen.

The session will address numerous issues at the intersection of Semantic Web and SEO. As the description reads, “From rich snippets to the Google Knowledge Graph to Bing Snapshots semantic technology has transformed the look, feel and functionality of search engines.”

Have these changes undermined the ways in which websites are optimized for search, effectively “killing” SEO? Or are tried-and-true SEO tactics still effective? And what does the future hold for SEO in a semantic world?

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The New World of Books: E-Reading Gets Robust

Cast your vote yet for The Booksmash Challenge? If not, you’ve got a chance to pull the lever for semantic technology for the contest, which is sponsored by HarperCollins and asks developers to create proof-of-concept apps using its OpenBook API that includes full access to select authors’ work.

Entered in the challenge is the KEeReader, a browser-based e-reading platform that brings the ability to identify concepts, entities and relationships within content and allow users to interact with it. Its chief architect is Eric Freese, who gave audiences at this past spring’s SemTech conference in San Francisco a first look at the platform, and who will be providing attendees at the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC the latest insights on its place in the evolving world of knowledge enhanced e-reading. KEeReader adds a semantic angle to its book discovery one, opening the door to a vastly richer experience, says Freese.

“The two main goals of this are first to bring e-books into being first- class citizens on the web,” he says, benefitting from search engine optimization techniques for discovery, subscription to open Web standards to leverage the world of web resources like Wiktionary, and even analytics about book use for publishers to use in their business strategies. “The second goal is to unlock knowledge contained within the book.”

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Exploit Agile Methodology For Big Project Wins

A global media organization that provides fixed-line internet IP TV to some 10 million customers had a new business initiative that was going to require it to gain some insight into its client base. After some 15 years in business, though, it’s not surprising to learn that that information exists – and re-exists in many different forms – across many legacy applications, and trying to map those customers’ old purchase relationships to a new product catalog as part of a new payment and sales platform could have been just the thing to slow down the company.

Does that situation sound familiar? If your company’s been in business for some length of time, the answer probably is a resounding yes. Like this media business, you may well be in a market with plenty of competitive threats, meaning that unless you constantly innovate, your bread and butter is threatened. And so, you too, probably always are turning to your IT infrastructure team with new requirements.

“And it can be hard for them to build what they need to deliver,” says Carl Bray, product manager at Ontology Systems.

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Why Your Business Needs To Get Going With Linked Data

Semantic Technology & Business Conference - NYC, October 2-3, 2013Any data-driven industry – and these days, that’s almost all of them – knows the challenges around bringing together data from many systems and from across many years to make use of it. There’s too much focus on making copies and transforming information, rather than getting value out of it.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Broad benefits await when an organization looks to how subscribing to the Linked Data model changes the game, offering a far more mature and sustainable approach to working with data than typical platform upgrades or conversion projects.

At the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in New York City in October, K. Krasnow Waterman will deliver the opening keynote focused on how and why Linked Data is a value to businesses in so many respects, including driving revenues and easing risk management and compliance requirements. “If you take that first step and make [Linked Data] your project, the value associated with it is so much greater than the next platform upgrade, because it unleashes all this opportunity to do things with data that you haven’t been able to do before,” says Krasnow Waterman, a visiting fellow at MIT whose work includes having created Linked Data Product Lab and Linked Data Ventures program, a web technology and entrepreneurship course, and CEO of LawTechIntersect, which offers data/technology management and policy consulting for private companies and government agencies.

At hand is the opportunity to manipulate your data across multiple data sources and have it lead to other data. “A great feature of Linked Data is the ability of data to reference other data,” says Krasnow Waterman. “So as you are tagging it and as people are supplementing it, that takes on an assistive capability that you simply don’t get from any other structured data that I know.”

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A Chat With David Amerland: Opening Up SEO In The Age Of Semantic Search

Cover of "Google Semantic Search" by David AmerlandMarketers, SEO experts and businesses not yet on-board with retooling their approaches to the new world of semantic technology and semantic search need to seriously rethink their positions.

Why? Check out the Q&A below with writer, speaker and analyst David Amerland, author of the new book Google™ Semantic SearchSearch Engine Optimization (SEO) Techniques That Get Your Company More Traffic, Increase Brand Impact, and Amplify Your Online Presence. Amerland also will be participating in this session, The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO; Long Live SEO, at the Semantic Technology & Business conference in New York City in October.

Semantic Web Blog: What was your motivation for writing Google Semantic Search?

Amerland: After working as a chemical engineer who wrote pieces for newspapers, and in cultural and business journalism, I became a communications director for a U.K. blue chip company, and part of my role was overseeing the changes of taking a massive company from the 19th century, where it was stuck, to the 21st century. Part of that was to create a web presence. And in different capacities I’ve guided other web companies. So I have seen the things I talk about around marketing in action.

I want to demystify SEO. I hate things to be cloaked in mystique. When there’s a mystique around things you do away with everything from comparison metrics to the opportunity to have best practices. That’s really bad for business. So that’s my motivation. Just as I used to demystify science in my early days as a journalist. I’m trying to open up SEO as it is today as much as possible.

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It’s Time To Take On Temporal Data Management For Semantic Data

Mankind has been trying to understand the nature of time since, well, since forever. How time works is a big question, with many different facets being explored by scientists, philosophers, even social-psychologists. Semantic technologists, however, are focusing a little more strategically, considering temporal data management for semantic data.

At the Semantic Technology and Business Conference in NYC, coming up in early October, Dean Allemang, principal consultant at Working Ontologist LLC will be hosting a panel on the topic of managing time in Linked Data. Relational database systems long have been tuned into dealing with bi-temporal data, which changes over two dimensions of time independently – that is, valid (real world) and transactional (database) time. Not so with RDF databases. But many institutions, in fields ranging from finance to health care, have no desire to go back.

“They’ll lose all the RDF powers they’re familiar with, all the semantic linkages,” says Allemang. “And if you want that kind of distributed data understood in your enterprise, a relational solution isn’t going to help.”

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Announced: Program for NYC Semantic Technology & Business Conference

Semantic Technology & Business Conference - October 2-3, 2013 in New York CityThe initial program has been announced for the next Semantic Technology & Business Conference in New York. The conference will take place October 2-3, 2013 at the New Yorker Hotel. This marks the second time this conference series has been to the Big Apple.

Eric Franzon, Conference Series Chair, said, “We are very excited about this conference. In addition to an already great program, we will be announcing other sessions, including must-see keynotes, in coming weeks, so we are excited for a very strong program full of solid learning and networking opportunities.”

Attendees will have the opportunity to explore semantic technologies in practice and to learn from the expert practitioners and business leaders who have already found value in semantic applications.

 

BREAKING: Semantic Technology & Business Conference Europe Changes Dates

Semantic Technology & Business Conference - Europe - Date updated: February, 2014Almost as soon as we announced the dates for our New York and European Semantic Technology & Business Conferences, we began hearing from members of the community that they would prefer to have more space between the two events.

We heard you and we have taken action! We are moving the Semantic Technology & Business Conference – Europe, to February of 2014, and the event will still take place in Berlin. We are finalizing details with the conference venue and will have more specifics to announce soon.

Those who have already registered, submitted speaking proposals, or signed up for sponsorship of the European event will receive separate communications specific to those discussions next week, and we will look forward to seeing you in New York October 2-3, 2013 and Berlin early next year!

 

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