2013 SemTechBiz East

Get Your Big, Linked, Smart Data eBook

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Attendees at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC earlier this month got first-access to Big, Linked, Smart Data, an eBook of selections from The Semantic Web Blog. It’s built on the KEeReader, a browser-based e-reading platform that brings the ability to identify concepts, entities and relationships within content and allow users to interact with it. Now, that Knowledge Enhanced eReader (KEeReader) is available to all on the bookshelf here.

The Semantic Web Blog introduced the KEeReader platform to our readers in this article, and its chief architect Eric Freese demonstrated it to conference attendees at SemTechNYC referencing content from Big, Linked, Smart Data and the authorized biography of Steve Jobs. (You can also find that on the bookshelf. ) 

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Monetize That Media: Media Mixer To Create Web-Wide Market For Media Fragment Reuse

rsz_robertopixWhen you hear Media Mixer, you might be thinking of a visual artist who works with different materials to create his or her works, or perhaps someone involved in audio production. You may not immediately think of the semantic web, Linked Data, or their role in making it easy to reuse and manage the copyrights for online media fragments.

Time to rethink your definition. The Media Mixer project is indeed about making the Web of Media a reality with the help of media fragment detection and semantic annotation, in conjunction with copyright management that is integrated into the Web fabric, using Linked Data principles and reasoning based on a Copyright Ontology. At the Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC earlier this month, Roberto Garcia Associate, Professor at Universitat de Lleida and principal investigator at  MediaMixer, discussed the EU-funded effort to create, repurpose and reuse media fragments across borders on the Web, and its goal of making media more valuable for its owners such as video producers, hosters and redistributors, and more useful for consumers.

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Following Up on FIBO At SemTechBiz

SemTechBizThe Financial Industry Business Ontology (FIBO) was a main topic of interest at last week’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference – which took place in New York City, the capital of the financial services industry. FIBO, as The Semantic Web Blog has previously discussed, is both a business conceptual ontology and an operational ontology delivered together, designed to be useful both to the financial industry and the regulatory community in understanding the complex patterns and relationships of information characteristic of the sector, with the goal of driving greater transparency. The FIBO initiative is a joint effort underway by the Object Management Group and the Enterprise Data Management (EDM) Council.  But many other different standards will be useful to solve the industry’s issues, as well.

At the presentation, Semantics in Finance, Thematix Partners’ principal Elisa Kendall – self-described standards wonk and member of the OMG Architecture Board and co-chair, Ontology Definition Metamodel (ODM) Revision Task Force – pointed out that the amount of regulation in the financial services sector has increased over 400 percent in the last two to three years. She argued for a little more sympathy for the financial services industry, too, which hasn’t been on the receiving end of a lot of that since about 2008 – even though some of these players stepped up to buy companies that were knocked flat by the mortgage market meltdown.

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Semantic Tech To The Rescue For Medicare Administrative Contractor

rsz_readWhen a Medicare administrative contractor found itself under the gun to improve its performance in order to retain its business with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, it was able to leverage semantic technology to realize its goals.

The audience at last week’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference heard about this case study from management consultancy Blue Slate Solutions, which specializes in improving and transforming operations through business process and analytic transformation and which spearheaded the semantic project for the contractor. “This client was struggling in the medical review process, to decide if claims should be paid,” recounted David S. Read, Blue Slate CTO.

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The Future of SEO: Panelists At SemTechBiz Weigh In

SEO is dead. Long Live SEO. A panel discussion.Where is SEO going? A panel hosted by Aaron Bradley, Internet marketing manager at InfoMine, Inc. at this week’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC took on the issue at full force. The session, featuring Bing senior product manager Duane Forrester,  semantic web strategist and independent consultant Barbara H. Starr, Swellpath SEO Team Manager Mike Arnesen, and author and analyst David Amerland (see our Q&A with him here), provided some insight into why it’s an exciting time to be working in both semantic technology and search – and why that’s also a scary proposition for some in the SEO set who’ve lived by keywords and links.

On the exciting side of things, Arnesen pointed out that it was always a somewhat unnatural process to have to advise clients to craft content so that it can match to specific keywords to get traction. “Now we can tell them to just write good content, put what you need to put on the web and it will be easier find because of semantic markup and semantic search,” he said.

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Linked Data: “The Gift That Keeps On Giving”

semtechnyclogoK. Krasnow Waterman started the New York Semantic Technology & Business Conference off on the right foot Wednesday, highlighting the highly practical virtues of the semantic web and Linked Data for all.

Krasnow Waterman pointed to four big benefits of a semantic web world, including easing the path to:

  • Analyzing data from multiple sources;
  • Understanding context, from the meaning of a particular term to the context of relationships;
  • Linking data; and
  • Applying rules in which there’s no limit about what can be said or linked to within program code that can be reasoned over as data flows through systems.

In her life as CEO of LawTechIntersect, which offers data/technology management and policy consulting, she noted that she’s now “talking to people about forestalling their platform upgrades, to go back instead and embed the tagging needed for semantic processing,” she told attendees at SemTech. “It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Do it and you can compute forevermore with that data.”

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Hooray For Semantic Tech In The Film Industry

Image courtesy popturfdotcom/Flickr

Image courtesy popturfdotcom/Flickr

The story below features an interview with Kurt Cagle, Information Architect Avalon Consulting, LLC, who is speaking this week at the Semantic Technology And Business Conference in NYC. You can save $200 when you register for the event before October 2.

 

New York has a rich history in the film industry.  The city was the capital of film production from 1895 to 1910. In fact, a quick trip from Manhattan to Queens will take you to the former home of the Kaufman Astoria Studios, now the site of the American Museum of the Moving Image. Even after the industry moved shop to Hollywood, New York continued to hold its own, as evidenced by this Wikipedia list of films shot in the city.

 

semtechnyclogoThis week, at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference, a session entitled Semantics Goes Hollywood will offer a perspective on the technology’s applicability to the industry for both its East and West Coast practitioners (and anyone in between). For that matter, even people in industries of completely different stripes stand to gain value: As Kurt Cagle, Information Architect at Avalon Consulting, LLC, who works with many companies in the film space, explains, “A lot of what I see is not really a Hollywood-based problem at all – it’s a data integration problem.”

 

Here’s a spotlight on some of the points Cagle will discuss when he takes the stage:

 

  • Just like any enterprise, studios that have acquired other film companies face the challenge of ensuring that their systems can understand the information that’s stored in the systems of the companies they bought. Semantic technology can come to the fore here as it has for industries that might not have the same aura of glamour surrounding them. “Our data models may not be completely in sync but you can represent both and communicate both into a single composite data system, and a language like SPARQL can query against both sets to provide information without having to do a huge amount of re-engineering,” Cagle says.

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Speech And Smarts Take To TV Search

rsz_vev1The story below features an interview with Sam Vasisht, CMO of Veveo, who is speaking next week at the Semantic Technology And Business Conference in NYC. You can save $200 when you register for the event before October 2.

A recent focus group report from Veveo, whose semantic technology powers conversational interfaces that enable search on connected devices from TVs to tablets and smart phones to set-top boxes, reveals that three out of four participants are dissatisfied with their existing pay-TV content discovery experience. Reasons include that they are unable to search using keywords; they don’t know how to spell what they were looking for or remember the name of the show they want when entering search terms; it takes too long to scroll through the electronic programming guide; and they don’t see any recommendations that seemed relevant to them.

In an online survey the vendor conducted, it also found that, when users were asked if they would like to use voice or if they’d use if they had it to find content, more than 60 percent said yes, according to CMO Sam Vasisht. “People think there has to be a better way,” he says. “The level of interest and the sense of urgency that companies have about making voice-enabled feature a part of TV is becoming very strong. But just voice commands won’t get you there. You need something above and beyond.”

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Calendars Get Smart With Tempo.AI

semtechnyclogoSRI International, which spearheaded the CALO (Cognitive Agent That Learns and Organizes) intelligent assistant for DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), has had more than one semantic project up its sleeve. One of them was Tempo.AI, which was spun off by SRI at the end of 2011. Earlier this year, the smart calendar app for the iPhone was formally launched, with Thierry Donneau-Golencer as co-founder and AI lead.

Donneau-Golencer, having also worked on CALO, clearly has a strong history of work related to dealing with information and how to make sense of it. “A lot of it had to do with semantic analysis, deriving meaning and useful information from content,” says Donneau-Golencer, with Tempo representing the next step in smart search across content by making the job more proactive.

At October’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC, Donneau-Golencer will share with attendees insights into the role semantic technology has in helping find and correlate information for users, with the least input possible required.

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UPDATE: The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.

[UPDATE: This panel has a new panelist! Mike Arnesen, SEO Team Manager of SwellPath will participate in New York.]

seo-is-dead-long-live-seoOn October 3 at the New York Semantic Technology & Business Conference (#SemTechBiz), a panel of experts will tackle the issue of how Semantic Web technologies are rapidly changing the landscape of Search Engine Optimization. The panel, titled “The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.,” is made up of Aaron Bradley, David Amerland, Barbara Starr, Duane Forrester, and Mike Arnesen.

The session will address numerous issues at the intersection of Semantic Web and SEO. As the description reads, “From rich snippets to the Google Knowledge Graph to Bing Snapshots semantic technology has transformed the look, feel and functionality of search engines.”

Have these changes undermined the ways in which websites are optimized for search, effectively “killing” SEO? Or are tried-and-true SEO tactics still effective? And what does the future hold for SEO in a semantic world?

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