Government

ODI Queensland joins the global open data community

Open Data Institute QueenslandQueensland, Australia, Dec. 2, 2014 (The ODI) — The Open Data Institute (ODI) today welcomes a new Node – ODI Queensland – to its international network.

ODI Queensland is being launched at the Queensland Government’s Open Data Awards Ceremony, which is being attended by a broad mix audience of researchers, students, business community and government.

The new Node and awards ceremony reflects a growing interest in open data across Australia, as Maree Adshead, the CEO of ODI Queensland reflects:

“Open data has been a high priority here in Queensland and right across Australia for some time now. We are therefore delighted to become a formal participant in the international ODI Node network, and look forward to contributing significant value both locally and globally.”

ODI Queensland will help to ensure that this broad commitment to open data is underpinned by in-depth understanding and expertise in how it is used and published, as Adshead explains:

“ODI Queensland will strive to foster a world class open data culture and capability in Queensland.  We will help make open data easier to publish, find, access and create with.  We will endeavour to quantify and demonstrate the tangible value of what can be generated using open data.”

“There are immediate challenges to be solved concerning quality, format and standards, as well as the need to prioritise publication of high value and interesting data,” Adshead explains. “ One of our first priorities will be education and awareness to address this challenge among both the public and private sectors. We need to get this part of the equation right in order to properly progress and realise the economic, social and environmental benefits of using open data.”

Gavin Starks, CEO at the ODI reflects on the launch of the new Node, “Queensland is now part of an international network that spans North America, South America, Europe and Asia: from Hawaii to Rio, Paris to Osaka. We look forward to working with the Node, to develop our shared vision, and to see it thrive and prosper.”

About the ODI

The Open Data Institute catalyses the evolution of open data culture to create economic, environmental, and social value. It unlocks supply, generates demand, creates and disseminates knowledge to address local and global issues. Founded by Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt and Professor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the ODI is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan company. http://www.theodi.org

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