Government

Global Corporate Networks Exposed through New Online Platform

World-wide interests of US banks first to be identified

Visualization of Goldman Sachs Corporate Network[Press Release] A new online platform launched today is set to provide free and open access to global corporate networks.

The platform, developed by OpenCorporates, collects, extracts and makes usable global corporate data, in an open and granular way. Large data sets, many of which were not available as open data before, have been imported by the London-based company, and used to develop corporate network visualisations which show the global corporate networks of businesses. Examples include IBM, Starbucks and Barclays.

In addition to the corporate network visualisations, the new technology has produced maps which show the world-wide interests of four US banks – Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. They reveal complex and deep networks, as well as the central position that the Cayman Islands have within them.

Chief Executive of OpenCorporate, Chris Taggart said:

Photo of Chris Taggart“This platform is an incredibly powerful and innovative piece of technology. Prior to its development, many of the datasets we are using were only available as web pages or PDFs. Now we are bringing this data together into a useable format which will change the way people are able to access and view corporate networks.”

“The emphasis we place on detailed provenance and confidence scores with this platform is substantially better than existing efforts to identify corporate networks, which are essentially ‘black boxes’. These hide the underlying data used to derive the relationship links, give no indication of how likely the information is to be correct, or the date the information related to. We believe that in a world which is increasingly dependent on corporate data, this is critical – whether you are an investigative journalist, or calculating credit risk.”

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“The Durkheim Project” Will Analyze Opt-In Data From Veterans, Analyze Suicide Risk

BOSTON, WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, Vt., and MENLO PARK, Calif., July 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Patterns and Predictions, and the Veterans Education and Research Association of Northern New England, with help from Facebook, Inc., today launched a research project designed to help mental health professionals detect and monitor communications and behavioral patterns predictive of suicide risk — informed by a related study of an anonymous population of risk in U.S. veterans. Called “The Durkheim Project,”* this initiative will create a voluntary, opt-in database of participants’ social media and mobile phone data — information that eventually could provide clinicians with real-time assessments of psychological risk factors for suicide and other destructive behaviors. Read more

Cost-saving Pilot Programs to Support Warfighter Autonomy

WASHINGTON, June 19, 2013 – A call from the Defense Department to government labs for autonomous technology ideas that support the warfighter has been answered with seven initiatives.

Chosen from more than 50 submissions, the selected ideas will be tested in the Autonomy Research Pilot Initiative, officials said.

The pilot research initiative’s goal is to advance technologies that will result in autonomous systems that provide more capability to warfighters, lessen the cognitive load on operators and supervisors, and lower overall operational cost, explained Jennifer Elzea, a DOD spokeswoman. Read more

What The NSA Can Do With All That Data

Sean Gallagher of Ars Technica writes, “Most of us are okay with what Google does with its vast supply of ‘big data,’ because we largely benefit from it—though Google does manage to make a good deal of money off of us in the process. But if I were to backspace over Google’s name and replace it with ‘National Security Agency,’ that would leave a bit of a different taste in many people’s mouths. Yet the NSA’s PRISM program and the capture of phone carriers’ call metadata are essentially about the same sort of business: taking massive volumes of data and finding relationships within it without having to manually sort through it, and surfacing ‘exceptions’ that analysts are specifically looking for. The main difference is that with the NSA, finding these exceptions can result in Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrants to dig deeper—and FBI agents knocking at your door. So what is it, exactly, that the NSA has in its pile of ‘big data,’ and what can they do with it?” Read more

Status Update on US Open Data Collaboration

Todd Park

Justin Kern of Information Management reports, “The U.S. government is outlining its new program for an open source repository to foster collaboration on getting more information to citizens in a faster manner. Federal CTO Todd Park formally introduced Project Open Data on Thursday in a blog post, and gave an update on its first days of activity. In the first 24 hours after Project Open Data was published, more than two dozen contributors submitted to its GitHub platform, including fixes to broken Web links and policy input. Other, meatier contributions, or ‘pull requests,’ included a tool that converts spreadsheets and databases into APIs for ease of use by developers, and code that translates geographic data from locked formats into open, available formats, according to Park.” Read more

Obama Signs Open Data Executive Order

Danny Palmer of Computing.co.uk reports, “US President Barack Obama has signed an executive order that requires government agencies to make publicly accessible data open and machine readable. ‘Government information shall be managed as an asset throughout its life cycle to promote interoperability and openness, and, wherever possible and legally permissible, to ensure that data are released to the public in ways that make the data easy to find, accessible, and usable,’ reads the Open Data Policy order. In 2009, Obama pledged to make his administration the most open in the history of US government. The administration hopes that innovators, including researchers and entrepreneurs, will be able to examine and use the data to benefit the country.” Read more

Expert System Announces Cogito Intelligence API for Government and Corporate Intelligence

MODENA, ITALY–(Marketwired – April 24, 2013) - Expert System, the semantic technology company, today introduces its newest solution, the Cogito Intelligence API, bringing advanced semantic functions to enable Government and Corporate Security analysts to access and exploit their most strategic sources of information.

Cogito Intelligence API is available for free proof of concept testing, with volume pricing and annual subscription levels. The API enables Government, Intelligence, Law Enforcement Agencies and enterprise Corporate Security functions to add semantic processing, text mining, categorization and tagging features to their analysis platforms and applications for faster evaluation of intelligence data. Read more

San Francisco Boosts Open Data Efforts

Joshua Sabatini of The San Francisco Examiner reports, “San Francisco has fallen behind in the open-data movement, but city officials say a new proposal will once again put it on the forefront. Three years ago, The City adopted its first open-data ordinance to encourage departments to release their data sets — i.e., restaurant health scores or details on special events in The City. But the effort appears to have wilted, and cities such as New York, Philadelphia and Chicago have since created more aggressive initiatives than San Francisco. ‘Unfortunately we have fallen a little bit behind,’ said Board of Supervisors President David Chiu. ‘We have about 500 city-maintained data sets. But there are literally thousands of data sets that we could put out to the public’.” Read more

Chicago Uses GitHub to Open Up Data

Alex Howard of O’Reilly Radar reports, “GitHub has been gaining new prominence as the use of open source software in government grows. Earlier this month, I included a few thoughts from Chicago’s chief information officer, Brett Goldstein, about the city’s use of GitHub, in a piece exploring GitHub’s role in government. While Goldstein says that Chicago’s open data portal will remain the primary means through which Chicago releases public sector data, publishing open data on GitHub is an experiment that will be interesting to watch, in terms of whether it affects reuse or collaboration around it. In a followup email, Goldstein, who also serves as Chicago’s chief data officer, shared more about why the city is on GitHub and what they’re learning. Our discussion follows.” Read more

IBM & Deutsche Telekom Building Smarter Cities

David Meyer of GigaOM reports, “IBM and Deutsche Telekom, the carrier behind the T-Mobile brand, are to work together on creating smart city systems, the companies have announced. The smart city concept, which is closely related to the internet of things, is reliant on pervasive connectivity, drawing on what has traditionally been known as machine-to-machine (M2M) technology to hook up everything from traffic lights to public transport vehicles to the local broadband network. This usually involves the use of cellular networks.” Read more

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