Health Care / Life Sciences

AIP Publishing and Publishing Technology Go-Live with Next Generation Scitation

Publishing Technology

Feb 05, 2014–AIP Publishing LLC and Publishing Technology have launched the next generation of AIP’s Scitation site, serving hundreds of thousands of scientists around the world.

 

Launched on a new custom platform developed using Publishing Technology’s pub2web hosting solution, AIP Publishing and seven AIP Member Societies are now housing nearly a million articles from 47 journals, as well as conference proceedings, standards and blogs. The site also hosts Physics Today, AIP’s flagship magazine. Read more

Cambridge Semantics Integrates ChemAxon Search and Visualization Capabilities into Anzo Software

Cambridge Semantics

Cambridge, Mass. (PRWEB) February 18, 2014 — Cambridge Semantics, the leading provider of Unified Information Access (UIA) solutions for enterprises, today announced it has partnered with ChemAxon to provide customers with advanced chemical search and visualization capabilities.

 

ChemAxon’s products and services focus on adding functionality and value to chemistry information and provides cheminformatics software platforms, applications and services to optimize the value of chemistry information in life science and other R&D. Based on semantic technology, Cambridge Semantics’ Anzo software addresses a variety of enterprise data management and end-user data consumption challenges in the pharma, financial and life science industries. Read more

IBM Invests in Welltok, a Health Platform Using the Power of Watson

welltok

Dan Primack of Fortune reports, “Last month, IBM committed to invest $100 million in tech startups that are leveraging Watson, the company’s famed cognitive computing platform. [Wednesday], IBM [announced] that the first portfolio company in its ‘Watson Fund’ is Welltok, a Denver-based health optimization platform. IBM is participating in Welltok’s new $22 million Series C funding round, which is being led by venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates. Also investing is Qualcomm Ventures and existing Welltok shareholders Emergence Capital Partners, InterWest Partners, Miramar Venture Partners and Okapi Venture Capital.” Read more

Boopsie Partners with Parity Computing to Provide Library Apps for Corporations in Need of Efficient Mobile Access

parity

Sunnyvale, CA (PRWEB) February 12, 2014–Boopsie, Inc., the leading mobile solution for libraries, announces its partnership with Parity Computing Inc., the leader in intelligent automation solutions for the Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM) industry, to provide mobile apps and efficient analytics services to libraries. The partnership is focused on providing rich search and recommendation services to academic and corporate libraries.

 

Parity provides powerful data mining, analytics, and decision-support systems for STM publishers and research institutes. Semantic analysis is a core part of Parity’s approach to deriving insights from large, heterogeneous, and often unstructured data sets. Parity’s Semantic Profiling Engine™ – applied to corpora of scientific, engineering and medical literature, business documents, and clinical records – enables applications ranging from automated publication profiles of scientists to journal, article, and grant recommendations. Read more

Stanford Researchers Develop Tool for Semantically Interpreting Medical Images

stan

Lia Steakley of the Scope Blog recently wrote, “A web-based tool created by researchers at Stanford enables physicians and researchers to better interpret the wealth of data contained in medical images by capturing information in a way that is explicit and computationally accessible. The tool, called electronic Physician Annotation Device (ePAD), was developed by the Rubin Lab at the School of Medicine and is available to download for free. Daniel Rubin, MD, an assistant professor of radiology, and his team initially designed ePAD in response to an unmet need in cancer imaging, but he says the tool can be used more generally quantitatively evaluate images and characterize disease.” Read more

Interest Grows In Riding The Semantic Wave

Image Courtesy: Flickr/ Peter Kaminski

Image Courtesy: Flickr/ Peter Kaminski

Industry leaders in sectors including banking and financial services look to have high hopes for semantic technology. They’re thinking about FIBO (Financial Industry Business Ontology) and leveraging semantic technology for more traditional types of data integration and analytics projects. At Cognizant, Thomas Kelly, a director in its Enterprise Information Management practice – and the author of this white paper on How Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business – sees the positive development that clients in the Fortune 500 space like these “are maturing in their use of semantic technology, from a project focus to more enterprise initiatives.”

The interest in FIBO, he says, is representative of an overall interest across in industries in leveraging industry ontologies as mechanisms to help companies better standardize, align and learn from the output of industry-wide efforts. The attention that industry analysts, including Gartner, have put on the semantic web in the last year – not to mention regulators beginning to consider its use in sharing information on a regulatory basis – have helped increase interest by commercial organizations, Kelly notes. That’s also evident in the life sciences sector, as another example, with the efforts of the FDA/PhUSE  Semantic Technology Working Group Project to include a draft set of existing CDISC standards in RDF.

The pickup in attention to many things semantic ties to the different perspectives that organizations need to manage about their data, which include “how they currently think of their data, how it is currently perceived in managing business operations; and where they are looking to go in the future that makes it more inclusive of what’s going on in the world outside their walls – that is, how the rest of the industry looks at this data and uses it to support their business processes,” he says.

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Leaders in HIT Discuss Their New Year’s Resolutions

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David Carr of Information Week recently wrote, “In 2014, healthcare technology leaders will be wishing, and working, for improvement in the healthcare system and the technologies to support it. I asked 10 CIOs and other health tech leaders for one or two pithy thoughts about what they would like to see in the new year. Here are their responses — some as bullet points and others as longer prose — via email, lightly edited.”

 

John Halamka, CIO, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center told Carr, “2014 will be a turning point for healthcare IT as we finish a large number of regulatory mandates — ICD10, Meaningful Use Stage 2, HIPAA Omnibus Rule, and Affordable Care Act requirements. Read more

What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

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In Search Of Apps To Leverage Public BioMolecular Data In RDF Platform

rsz_rdfpfThe European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) that is part of Europe’s leading life sciences laboratory this fall launched a new RDF platform hosting data from six of the public database archives it maintains. That includes peer-reviewed and published data, submitted through large-scale experiments, from databases covering genes and gene expression, proteins (with SIB), pathways, samples, biomodels and molecules with drug-like properties. And next week, during a competition at SWAT4LS in Edinburgh, it’s hoping to draw developers with innovative use case ideas for life-sciences apps that can leverage that data to the benefit of bioinformaticians or bench biologists.

“We need developers to build apps on top of the platform, to build apps to pull in data from these and other sources,” explains Andy Jenkinson, Technical Project Manager at EMBL-EBI. “There is the potential using semantic technology to build those apps more rapidly,” he says, as it streamlines integrating biological data, which is a huge challenge given the data’s complexity and variety. And such apps will be a great help for lab scientists who don’t know anything about working directly with RDF data and SPARQL queries.

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HealthCare.Gov: Progress Made But BackEnd Struggles Continue

rsz_hcgovThe media has been reporting the last few hours on the Obama administration’s self-imposed deadline for fixing HealthCare.gov. According to these reports, the site is now working more than 90 percent of the time, up from 40 percent in October; that pages on the website are loading in less than a second, down from about eight; that 50,000 people can simultaneously use the site and that it supports 800,000 visitors a day; and page-load failures are down to under 1 percent.

There’s also word, however, that while the front-end may be improved, there are still problems on the back-end. Insurance companies continue to complain they aren’t getting information correctly to support signups. “The key question,” according to CBS News reporter John Dickerson this morning, “is whether that link between the information coming from the website getting to the insurance company – if that link is not strong, people are not getting what was originally promised in the entire process.” If insurance companies aren’t getting the right information for processing plan enrollments, individuals going to the doctor’s after January 1 may find that they aren’t, in fact, covered.

Jeffrey Zients, the man spearheading the website fix, at the end of November did point out that work remains to be done on the backend for tasks such as coordinating payments and application information with insurance companies. Plans are for that to be in effect by mid-January.

As it turns out, among components of its backend technology, according to this report in the NY Times, is the MarkLogic Enterprise NoSQL database, which in its recent Version 7 release also added the ability to store and query data in RDF format using SPARQL syntax.

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