Industry Verticals

Smart Cities Are Coming

view of a city public tansportation yard and skyline at night.A recent press release states, “Transforming our cities into the Smart Cities of the future will encompass incorporating technologies and key digital developments all linked by machine-to-machine (M2M) solutions and real-time data analytics which sit under the umbrella term of the Internet of Things. Smart cities however must be underpinned by the appropriate ICT infrastructure based on fibre optic and high-speed wireless technologies, which is well underway in many developed cities around the world. This infrastructure allows for the development of smart communities; supporting connected homes; intelligent transport systems; e-health; e-government and e-education; smart grids and smart energy solutions – just to name a few of the exciting solutions smart cities will incorporate. Many of the technological advancements emerging around the world today can, and will be, applied to smart cities. Artificial Intelligence; Electric Vehicles; Autonomous Vehicles; Mobile applications; Drones; Wearable and Smart devices and so on are just some of the key developments to watch.” Read more

Enlitic is Teaching Computers to Detect Cancer

enliticCaleb Garling of the MIT Technology Review reports, “Machines are doing more and more of the work typically completed by humans, and detecting diseases may be next: a new company called Enlitic takes aim at the examination room by employing computers to make diagnoses based on images. Enlitic cofounder and CEO Jeremy Howard—formerly the president and lead scientist at data-crunching startup Kaggle—says the idea is to teach computers how to recognize various injuries, diseases, and disorders by showing them hundreds of x-rays, MRIs, CT scans, and other films. Howard believes that with enough experience, a computer can start to spot trouble and flag the images immediately for a physician to investigate. That could save physicians from having to comb through stacks of films.” Read more

NSTIC Embraces ID Management Solution

Photo of the band KISS concert in Montreal - Kiss Alive 35 TourKat Megas of NSTIC recently wrote, “Among the questions we’re asked most frequently about NSTIC is: why are trusted identities good for business? The NSTIC pilots have collectively started to answer that question, highlighting how better privacy, security and convenience are enabling new online business models, and driving higher sales and profits. One of the better examples of this has been the work done by NSTIC pilot awardee ID.me. In 2013, ID.me received a $2.8M cooperative agreement from NIST to pilot its trusted identity solution, which enables members of the military community and their families, First Responders, and students to access exclusive benefits and services online both securely and efficiently without having to share sensitive information with the brands directly. While this easy-to-use and interoperable solution aligns with the NSTIC guidelines, it also benefits partner companies’ bottom line.”

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Deconstructing Google’s Knowledge Graph

Image from Google I/O showing the addition of information into Google's Knowledge Graph using JSON-LD.Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently observed that, “Search is changing – and it’s changing faster than ever. Increasingly, we are seeing organic elements in search results being displaced by displays coming from the Knowledge Graph. Yet the shift from search over documents (e.g. web pages) to search over data (e.g. Knowledge Graph) is still in its infancy. Remember Google’s mission statement: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful. The Knowledge Graph was built to help with that mission. It contains information about entities and their relationships to one another – meaning that Google is increasingly able to recognize a search query as a distinct entity rather than just a string of keywords. As we shift further away from keyword-based search and more towards entity-based search, internal data quality is becoming more imperative.”

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Getty Releases More Linked Open Data: Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Linked Open Data - Getty VocabulariesLast winter, SemanticWeb reported that the Getty Research Institute had released the first of four Getty vocabularies as Linked Open Data. Recently, the Getty revealed that it had unveiled its second. James Cuno wrote, “We’re delighted to announce that the Getty Research Institute has released the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN)® as Linked Open Data. This represents an important step in the Getty’s ongoing work to make our knowledge resources freely available to all. Following the release of the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT)® in February, TGN is now the second of the four Getty vocabularies to be made entirely free to download, share, and modify. Both data sets are available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0).”

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Introducing SPARQLGraph, a Platform for Querying Biological Semantic Web Databases

sgDominik Schweiger, Zlatko Trajanoski and Stephan Pabinger recently wrote, “Semantic Web has established itself as a framework for using and sharing data across applications and database boundaries. Here, we present a web-based platform for querying biological Semantic Web databases in a graphical way.  Results: SPARQLGraph offers an intuitive drag &drop query builder, which converts the visual graph into a query and executes it on a public endpoint. The tool integrates several publicly available Semantic Web databases, including the databases of the just recently released EBI RDF platform. Furthermore, it provides several predefined template queries for answering biological questions. Users can easily create and save new query graphs, which can also be shared with other researchers.” Read more

Syapse Selects SYSTAP’s Bigdata® as Semantic Database for Precision Medicine Data Platform

Syapse and BigData logosFor immediate release: 8/19/2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. – SYSTAP, LLC. today announced that Syapse, the leading provider of software for enabling precision medicine, has selected Bigdata® as its backend semantic database. Syapse, which launched the Precision Medicine Data Platform in 2011, will use the Bigdata® database as a key element of their semantic platform. The Syapse Precision Medicine Data Platform integrates medical data, omics data, and biomedical knowledge for use in the clinic. Syapse software is delivered as a cloud-based SaaS, enabling access from anywhere with an internet connection, regular software updates and new features, and online collaboration and delivery of results, with minimal IT resources required. Syapse applications comply with HIPAA/HITECH, and data in the Syapse platform are protected according to industry standards.

Syapse’s Precision Medicine Data Platform features a semantic layer that provides powerful data modeling, query, and integration functionality. According to Syapse CTO and Co-Founder, Tony Loeser, Ph.D., “We have adopted SYSTAP’s graph database, Bigdata®, as our RDF store. Bigdata’s exceptional scalability, query performance, and high-availability architecture make it an enterprise-class foundation for our semantic technology stack.”

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New Schema.org Extension Proposal for the Automotive Industry

Photo: Interior of automobileThere is no doubt about it: Schema.org is a big success. It has motivated hundreds of thousands of Web site owners to add structured data markup to their HTML templates and brought the idea of exchanging structured data over the WWW from the labs and prototypes to real business.

Unfortunately, the support for information about the sales and rental of vehicles, namely cars, motorbikes, trucks, boats, and bikes has been insufficient for quite a while. Besides two simple classes for http://schema.org/Vehicle and http://schema.org/Car with no additional properties, there was nothing in the vocabulary that would help marking up granular vehicle information in new or used car listing sites or car rental offers.

Recently, Mirek Sopek, Karol Szczepański and I have released a fully-fledged extension proposal for schema.org that fixes this shortcoming and paves the ground for much better automotive Web sites in the light of marketing with structured data.

This proposal builds on the following vehicle-related extensions for GoodRelations, the e-commerce model of schema.org:

It adds the core classes, properties and enumerated values for describing cars, trucks, busses, bikes, and boats and their features. For describing commercial aspects of related offers, http://schema.org/Offer already provides the necessary level of detail. Thus, our proposal does not add new elements for commercial features.

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How Semantic Search Predicts the Future

11066925735_dbe0318b25Daniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote his third and final article in a series on the future of marketing and how that future is interwoven with semantic search. Newman writes, “The internet is getting smarter and this growing intelligence and insights is populating a new kind of semantic web that is providing more than just the most relevant results for people searching, but also some key data to marketers that may just tell us about intent. For movie fans out there, you may remember the movie Minority Report. In this Tom Cruise feature film the star would go out and stop crimes before they would happen as intelligence reached a point where it could see a crime that was about to be committed. At the time the concept seemed pretty far fetched, but really this type of intelligence is very similar to how the semantic web may be able to tell you who may be your next big customer.” Read more

Modern Science Must Be Open Science

3515348126_4315caf417Peter Murray-Rust of OpenSource.com recently wrote, “Open is about sharing and collaboration. It’s the idea that ‘we’ is more powerful, more rewarding and fulfilling than ‘I’. I can’t promise jobs, but I do know that openis becoming very big. Governments and funders are pushing the open agenda, even though academics are generally uninterested or seriously self-interested. Some governments and some companies recognize the value of teams; academia and academics generally don’t. The false values of impact factor and the false values of academic publishing mean that open access is a poor reflection of open, or what you may recognize as the open source way.” Read more

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