Libraries

Bringing the Power of the Cloud to Research Libraries

5810163712_ac8a7f249e_zResearch Information recently wrote, “There are several potential benefits to libraries of using cloud-based resources and services. These include increased efficiencies, opportunities for collaboration, decreased need for in-house technical expertise, cost savings, and more timely access to the latest IT functionality. The cloud also promises improved workflow, automated software updates, redundancy, and back-ups. ‘Libraries have a real need for efficiency in processing operations, notably combining maintenance of print and electronic content in a single set of workflows,’ said [Jane] Burke [VP of Market Development at ProQuest]. ‘The new model systems offer unified workflows for all types of content within a single solution.  They also offer the platform to provide qualitative benefits, such as a centralised knowledgebase.  A robust knowledgebase is critical to delivering unified collection management.’” Read more

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Turns Ten

odnbDavid Hill Radcliffe of the OUPblog recently wrote, “The publication of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography in September 2004 was a milestone in the history of scholarship, not least for crossing from print to digital publication. Prior to this moment a small army of biographers, myself among them, had worked almost entirely from paper sources, including the stately volumes of the first, Victorian ‘DNB’ and its 20th-century print supplement volumes. But the Oxford DNB of 2004 was conceived from the outset as a database and published online as web pages, not paper pages reproduced in facsimile. In doing away with the page image as a means of structuring digital information, the online ODNB made an important step which scholarly monographs and articles might do well to emulate.” Read more

Getty Releases More Linked Open Data: Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Linked Open Data - Getty VocabulariesLast winter, SemanticWeb reported that the Getty Research Institute had released the first of four Getty vocabularies as Linked Open Data. Recently, the Getty revealed that it had unveiled its second. James Cuno wrote, “We’re delighted to announce that the Getty Research Institute has released the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN)® as Linked Open Data. This represents an important step in the Getty’s ongoing work to make our knowledge resources freely available to all. Following the release of the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT)® in February, TGN is now the second of the four Getty vocabularies to be made entirely free to download, share, and modify. Both data sets are available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0).”

Read more