Industry Verticals

Edgecase Wants To Help Online Retailers Build A Shoppers’ Discovery Paradise

shoppingLate this summer, adaptive experience company Compare Metrics (see our earlier coverage here) rebranded itself as Edgecase, carrying forward its original vision of creating inspiring online shopping experiences. Edgecase is working on white-label implementations with retail clients such as Crate & Barrel, Wasserstrom, Urban Decay, Golfsmith, Kate Somerville Cosmetics, and Rebecca Minkoff to build a better discovery experience for their customers, generating user-friendly taxonomies from the data they already have but haven’t been able to leverage to maximum shopper advantage.

“No one had thought about reinvigorating navigation or the search experience for 15 years,” says Garrett Eastham, cofounder and CEO. “The interactions driving these conversation today were driven by database engineers a decade ago, but now we are at the point in the evolution of ecommerce to make the web experience evolve to what it is like in the physical world.”

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Healthline Launches New HealthData Engine

hitcJasmine Pennic of HIT Consultant reports, “Healthline, provider of intelligent health information and technology solutions, today launched its HealthData Engine to harness the power of structured and unstructured data to improve outcomes and reduce costs. The new big data analytics platform leverages the company’s market-leading HealthTaxonomy, advanced clinical natural language processing (NLP) technologies and semantic analysis to turn patient data into actionable insights.” Read more

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Turns Ten

odnbDavid Hill Radcliffe of the OUPblog recently wrote, “The publication of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography in September 2004 was a milestone in the history of scholarship, not least for crossing from print to digital publication. Prior to this moment a small army of biographers, myself among them, had worked almost entirely from paper sources, including the stately volumes of the first, Victorian ‘DNB’ and its 20th-century print supplement volumes. But the Oxford DNB of 2004 was conceived from the outset as a database and published online as web pages, not paper pages reproduced in facsimile. In doing away with the page image as a means of structuring digital information, the online ODNB made an important step which scholarly monographs and articles might do well to emulate.” Read more

News Organizations Need Better Tagging and Linking

5272448889_b6644fd7a5_zFrederic Filloux of Quartz recently wrote, “Most media organizations are still stuck in version 1.0 of linking. When they produce content, they assign tags and links mostly to other internal content. This is done out of fear that readers would escape for good if doors were opened too wide. Assigning tags is not exact science: I recently spotted a story about the new pregnancy in the British royal family; it was tagged ‘demography,’ as if it was some piece about Germany’s weak fertility rate.” Read more

Semantic Interoperability of Electronic Healthcare Info On The Agenda At U.S. Veterans Health Administration

LVScreenThe Yosemite Project, unveiled at this August’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference during the second annual RDF as a Universal Healthcare Exchange Language panel, lays out a roadmap for leveraging RDF in support of making all structured healthcare information semantically interoperable. (The Semantic Web Blog’s sister publication, Dataversity.net, has an article on its site explaining the details of that roadmap.)

The Yosemite Project grew out of the Yosemite Manifesto that was announced at the 2013 SemTechBiz conference (see our story here). The goals of the Manifesto have now been mapped out into the Project’s guidelines to follow on the journey to semantic interoperability by David Booth, senior software architect at Hawaii Resource Group (who led the RDF Healthcare panels at both the 2013 and 2014 conferences). The approach taken by the Yosemite Project matches that of others in the healthcare sector who want to see semantic interoperability of electronic healthcare information.

Among them are Booth’s fellow panelists at this year’s event, including Rafael Richards. Richards, who is physician informaticist at the U.S. Veterans Health Administration – which counts 1,200 care sites in its portfolio – comments on that alignment as it relates to the work he is leading in the Linked Vitals project to integrate the VA’s VistA electronic health records system with data types conforming to Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources, orFHIR,standard for data exchange, and with information types supporting the Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes, or LOINC, database that facilitates the exchange and pooling of results for clinical care, outcomes management, and research.

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With Web 3.0, the Bots Can Do the Shopping for You

5237986683_f8e38a251e_nSramana Mitra of Wired recently wrote, “Back in 2007, even before the iPhone was launched, giving us a powerful computer in our pockets or handbags, I started outlining a vision for Web 3.0. Tim Berners-Lee, a father of the World Wide Web, talks about the ‘Semantic Web,’ a way that computers employ the meaning of words — not just pattern matching — along with logical rules to connect independent nuggets of data and so create more context for information. The formula that makes the most sense to me is this: Web 3.0 results from combining content, commerce, community and context, with personalization and vertical search. Or, to put it in a handy phrase: Web 3.0 = (4C + P + VS).” Read more

Smart Cities Are Coming

view of a city public tansportation yard and skyline at night.A recent press release states, “Transforming our cities into the Smart Cities of the future will encompass incorporating technologies and key digital developments all linked by machine-to-machine (M2M) solutions and real-time data analytics which sit under the umbrella term of the Internet of Things. Smart cities however must be underpinned by the appropriate ICT infrastructure based on fibre optic and high-speed wireless technologies, which is well underway in many developed cities around the world. This infrastructure allows for the development of smart communities; supporting connected homes; intelligent transport systems; e-health; e-government and e-education; smart grids and smart energy solutions – just to name a few of the exciting solutions smart cities will incorporate. Many of the technological advancements emerging around the world today can, and will be, applied to smart cities. Artificial Intelligence; Electric Vehicles; Autonomous Vehicles; Mobile applications; Drones; Wearable and Smart devices and so on are just some of the key developments to watch.” Read more

Enlitic is Teaching Computers to Detect Cancer

enliticCaleb Garling of the MIT Technology Review reports, “Machines are doing more and more of the work typically completed by humans, and detecting diseases may be next: a new company called Enlitic takes aim at the examination room by employing computers to make diagnoses based on images. Enlitic cofounder and CEO Jeremy Howard—formerly the president and lead scientist at data-crunching startup Kaggle—says the idea is to teach computers how to recognize various injuries, diseases, and disorders by showing them hundreds of x-rays, MRIs, CT scans, and other films. Howard believes that with enough experience, a computer can start to spot trouble and flag the images immediately for a physician to investigate. That could save physicians from having to comb through stacks of films.” Read more

NSTIC Embraces ID Management Solution

Photo of the band KISS concert in Montreal - Kiss Alive 35 TourKat Megas of NSTIC recently wrote, “Among the questions we’re asked most frequently about NSTIC is: why are trusted identities good for business? The NSTIC pilots have collectively started to answer that question, highlighting how better privacy, security and convenience are enabling new online business models, and driving higher sales and profits. One of the better examples of this has been the work done by NSTIC pilot awardee ID.me. In 2013, ID.me received a $2.8M cooperative agreement from NIST to pilot its trusted identity solution, which enables members of the military community and their families, First Responders, and students to access exclusive benefits and services online both securely and efficiently without having to share sensitive information with the brands directly. While this easy-to-use and interoperable solution aligns with the NSTIC guidelines, it also benefits partner companies’ bottom line.”

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Deconstructing Google’s Knowledge Graph

Image from Google I/O showing the addition of information into Google's Knowledge Graph using JSON-LD.Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently observed that, “Search is changing – and it’s changing faster than ever. Increasingly, we are seeing organic elements in search results being displaced by displays coming from the Knowledge Graph. Yet the shift from search over documents (e.g. web pages) to search over data (e.g. Knowledge Graph) is still in its infancy. Remember Google’s mission statement: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful. The Knowledge Graph was built to help with that mission. It contains information about entities and their relationships to one another – meaning that Google is increasingly able to recognize a search query as a distinct entity rather than just a string of keywords. As we shift further away from keyword-based search and more towards entity-based search, internal data quality is becoming more imperative.”

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