Innovation Spotlight

SemanticWeb.com “Innovation Spotlight” Interview with Kevin O’Connor, CEO of FindTheBest and Founder of DoubleClick

The founder of DoubleClick.com, purchased by Google in 2007 for around $3.7 billion,  Kevin O’Connor, spoke with me about his newest venture FindTheBest.com. Founded in 2009, FindTheBest.com makes recommendations and comparisons for just about anything of interest on the web.  Kevin tells us all about FindTheBest.com, recommendation engines, and future plans for his company.

If you would like your company to be considered for an interview please email editor[ at ]semanticweb[ dot ]com.


Sean:
Hi Kevin, after leaving DoubleClick, which was sold to Google, what made you decide to start another company?

Kevin: I resigned as the CEO of DoubleClick in 2000, although I did remain the Chairman until the company was sold in 2005. I had spent 17 years working 80-hour weeks—and loved it—but ultimately decided I wanted more balance in my life; that meant spending more time with my family.

My passion for tech, however, never faded. I wanted to find a way get back into the tech world, but still have time for all the other important things in life. So I decided to start my own venture capital firm—O’Connor Ventures—and began investing in promising startups like Surfline, Meet-Up, Procore and Travidia.

I honestly didn’t think I would get back into the tech world as a founder, but I was becoming more and more frustrated by the chaos of the Web and I wanted to find a way to organize it.

 Sean:  What inspired you to start FindTheBest.com? What problem where you trying to solve?

Kevin: FindTheBest was founded out of three fundamental problems I saw with the Web:

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SemanticWeb.com “Innovation Spotlight” Interview with Andreas Blumauer, CEO of Semantic Web Company

If you would like your company to be considered for an interview please email editor[ at ]semanticweb[ dot ]com.

In this segment of our “Innovation Spotlight” we spoke with Andreas Blumauer, the CEO of  Semantic Web Company. Semantic Web Company is headquartered in Vienna, Austria and their software extracts meaning from big data using linked data technologies. In this interview Andreas describes some of the their core products to us in more detail.

Sean: Hi Andreas. Can you give us a little background on your company? When did you get started in the Semantic Web?

Andreas: As an offspring of a ‘typical’ web agency from the early days of the internet, we became a specialized provider in 2004: The ‘Semantic Web School’ focused on research, consulting and training in the area of the semantic web. We learned quickly how the idea of a ‘semantic web’ was able to trigger a lot of great project visions but also, that most of the tools from the early days of the semantic web were rather scary for enterprises. In 2007 we experienced that information professionals began to search for grown-up semantic web solutions to improve their information infrastructure. We were excited that ‘our’ main topics obviously began to play a role in the development of IT-strategies in many organizations. We refocused on the development of software and renamed our company.

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SemanticWeb.com “Innovation Spotlight” Interview with Elliot Turner, CEO of AlchemyAPI.

If you would like your company to be considered for an interview please email editor[ at ]semanticweb[ dot ]com.

In this segment of our “Innovation Spotlight” we spoke with Elliot Turner (@eturner303), the founder and CEO of AlchemyAPI.com. AlchemyAPI’s cloud-based platform processes around 2.5 billion requests per month. Elliot describes how their API helps companies with sentiment analysis, entity extraction, linked data, text mining, and keyword extraction.

Sean: Hi Elliot, thanks for joining us, how did AlchemyAPI get started?

Elliot: AlchemyAPI was founded in 2005 and in the past seven years has become one of the most widely used semantic analysis APIs, processing billions of transactions monthly for customers across dozens of countries.

I am the Founder and CEO and a serial entrepreneur who comes from the information security space.  My previous company built and sold high-speed network security appliances. After it was acquired, I started AlchemyAPI to focus on the problem of understanding natural human language and written communications.

Sean: Can you describe how your API works? What does it allow your customers to accomplish?

Elliot: Customers submit content via a cloud-based API, and AlchemyAPI analyzes that information in real-time, transforming opaque blobs of text into structured data that can be used to drive a number of business functions. The service is capable of processing thousands of customer transactions every second, enabling our customers to perform large-scale text analysis and content analytics without significant capital investment.

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Introducing SemanticWeb.com “Innovation Spotlight” Series with Pingar

[Editor’s Note: This interview, conducted by guest Sean Golliher, is our first in the new series entitled “Innovation Spotlight.” It’s part of our initiative to introduce the semantic web community to innovative companies working on important problems using Semantic Technologies.

If you would like your company to be considered for an interview please email editor[ at ]semanticweb[ dot ]com.]

Pingar Interview:

Alyona Medelyan ( @zelandiya ) joined Pingar ( @PingarHQ ) in 2010 and is the chief research officer at Pingar. She has a PhD in Natural Language Processing that was completed at the University of Waikato and funded by Google. Her expertise areas are Keywords and Entity Extraction, as well as Wikipedia Mining.

In this interview we find out more about Pingar’s research, their products, and the clients they work with.

Sean: Hi Alyona. Thanks for speaking with us today.  When was Pingar founded and can you explain a little bit about what Pingar does?

Alyona: Pingar was founded in 2007 and in the past 5 years we have developed innovative software for document management and text analytics. I joined the company in 2010 and have been focusing more specifically on automated metadata assignment by adding keyword extraction, named entity recognition and taxonomy mapping capabilities.

Sean: What techniques do you use for keyword extraction and named entity recognition? Are you using any existing databases to aide with entity recognition?

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