Insight

Tim Berners-Lee: What Kind of Internet Do We Want

timbernersleeExchange Magazine recently wrote, “Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want? Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. He leads the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), overseeing the Web’s standards and development.” Read more

Colorado Learns about The Internet of Things

Still image from the video about Internet of Things (source: New York Times)The Denver Post recently reported that, “After a strong earthquake rattled Napa Valley early Sunday, California device maker Jawbone found out how many of its UP wristband users were shaken from their sleep and stayed up. About 93 percent of its customers within 15 miles of Napa, Calif., didn’t go back to sleep after the 6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m., said Andrew Rosenthal, senior product engineer for wellness at Jawbone. But what use could come from that information? “Why not tell people to go to work at 11 a.m. on Monday,” he said. The anecdote represents just one example of information being generated by what technologists call “The Internet of Things,” a topic Rosenthal and other panelists discussed Tuesday at the Colorado Innovation Network Summit in Denver. The summit continues Wednesday at the Denver Performing Arts Complex.”.

The article also states, “As recently as 2005, most households had “The Internet of Thing” — a desktop or laptop computer connected to the Internet, said Eric Schaefer, general manager of communications, data and mobility for Comcast Communications.

By 2010, “The Internet of Wireless Things” started to appear with the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets. The next phase is what Schaefer called “The Internet of Disjointed Things.” Schaefer described one co-worker who has 25 applications to run items in his home, many on different platforms. He predicts that those systems, by 2020, will communicate and operate with one another and be everywhere, a trend that ever-increasing broadband capacity will allow.”

Read more here.

Combining Connectivity with Cognitive Computing

Photo of David LoshinA recent report from David Loshin states, “As our world becomes more attuned to the generation, and more importantly, the use of massive amounts of data, information technology (IT) professionals are increasingly looking to new technologies to help focus on deriving value from the velocity of data streaming from a wide variety of data sources. The breadth of the internet and its connective capabilities has enabled the evolution of the internet of things (IoT), a dynamic ecosystem that facilitates the exchange of information among a cohort of devices organized to meet specific business needs. It does this through a growing, yet intricate interconnection of uniquely identifiable computing resources, using the internet’s infrastructure and employing internet protocols. Extending beyond the traditional system-to-system networks, these connected devices span the architectural palette, from traditional computing systems, to specialty embedded computer modules, down to tiny micro-sensors with mobile-networking capabilities.”

Loshin added, “In this paper, geared to the needs of the C-suite, we’ll explore the future of predictive analytics by looking at some potential use cases in which multiple data sets from different types of devices contribute to evolving models that provide value and benefits to hierarchies of vested stakeholders. We’ll also introduce the concept of the “insightful fog,” in which storage models and computing demands are distributed among interconnected devices, facilitating business discoveries that influence improved operations and decisions. We’ll then summarize the key aspects of the intelligent systems that would be able to deliver on the promise of this vision.”

The full report, “How IT can blend massive connectivity with cognitive computing to enable insights” is available for download for a fee.

Read more here.

5 Ways to Add Machine Learning Java

javaSerdar Yegulalp of InfoWorld recently wrote, “After spending decades in the shadows as a specialty discipline, machine learning is suddenly front and center as a business tool. The hard part, though, is making it useful, especially to the developers and budding data scientists who are being tasked with the job. To that end, we rounded up some of the most common and useful open source machine learning tools we’ve spotted in the wild.” Read more

Alex Dayon of Salesforce.com on the Internet of Things

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Bruce Rogers of Forbes recently wrote, “There is a wave of digital disruption coming at CMOs from all fronts. The world has shifted over the past five years, mostly because of the emergence of the ‘internet of things’–a world where nearly everyone and everything is interconnected in a web enabled network. But according to Alex Dayon, former co-founder of Business Objects and now president of Salesforce.com’s applications and platform products, ‘we could call ourselves the ‘internet of customers’ because we’ve always connected devices and apps. It means there’s a customer behind it. By 2020 there will be 50 billion connected devices. And behind every device, whether it’s a smartphone, a car, a toothbrush, or a light bulb, there is a customer’.” Read more

Why the Resume is Outdated

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Terence Tse, Mark Esposito, and Olaf Groth of the Harvard Business Review write, “While we are surrounded by a wave of new disruptive technologies and apps, HR still hasn’t improved how it evaluates the prospective workforce. Traditional hiring processes that revolve around CVs are no longer sufficient – they don’t pinpoint the right qualities demanded of leaders today, and their dated criteria obscures many talented individuals from even hitting the radar. There is nothing inherently wrong with resumes – they highlight applicants’ past achievements and experience. But while CVs are good at showcasing formal skills, they’re not very useful for identifying values and behavior.” Read more

Why the Role of the Data Scientist is Growing

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Kevin Casey of Information Week recently wrote, “Old-school organizations will fuel the next swell of data-driven initiatives in IT. So what’s in store for the early movers and, specifically, their big-data professionals? How will the data scientist and similar roles evolve? ‘The role is becoming bigger,’ said Olly Downs, chief scientist at big-data analytics firm Globys, in a recent interview. By bigger, he means in every way — what was once a niche is now, at least in some companies, a driving force.” Read more

The Future of Personalization

[Editor's Note: This guest article comes to us from Dr. Nathan Wilson, CTO of Nara. ]

Photo of Thomas Jefferson statue and modern person with smart device The Problem: Information has run amok.

There once was a time when the busiest and greatest minds –the Jeffersons, Hemingways and Darwins – would have time in their day for long walks, communion with nature, and leisurely handwritten correspondence. Today we awaken each day to an immediate cacophony of emails, tweets, websites and apps that are too numerous to navigate with full consciousness. Swimming in wires, pixels, data bits, and windows with endless tabs is toxic to you and to me, and the problem continues to escalate.

How do you connect to this teeming network without electrocuting your brain? “Filtering” is a simple, but ultimately blinding, approach that shields us from important swaths of knowledge. “Forgetting faster” is potentially a valid solution, but also underserves our mindfulness.

A History of Attempted Solutions So Far: How have we tried to solve information glut so far, and why is each solution inadequate?

Phase 1 – The Web as a Linnaean Taxonomy (1994-2000)

The first method to deal with our information explosion came in “Web 1.0” when portals like Yahoo! arose to elegantly categorize information that you could explore at your leisure. For instance, one could find information on the New England Patriots by following a trail of breadcrumbs from “Sports” to “Football” to “AFC East” and finally “New England Patriots” where you were presented with a list of topical websites.

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Internet of Things Impacts Big Data

depiction of internet of things objectsAccording to Mike Kavis of Forbes, “Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons. McKinsey Global Institute reports that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion of revenue by 2025. Many people wonder if companies are ready for this explosion of data generated for IoT? As with any new technology, security is always the first point of resistance. I agree that IoT brings a wave of new security concerns but the bigger concern is how woefully prepared most data centers are for the massive amount of data coming from all of the “things” in the near future.”

Kavis went on to write that, “Some companies are still hanging on to the belief that they can manage their own data centers better than the various cloud providers out there. This state of denial should all but go away when the influx of petabyte scale data becomes a reality for enterprises. Enterprises are going to have to ask themselves, “Do we want to be in the infrastructure business?” because that is what it will take to provide the appropriate amount of bandwidth, disk storage, and compute power to keep up with the demand for data ingestion, storage, and real-time analytics that will serve the business needs. If there ever was a use case for the cloud, the IoT and Big Data is it. Processing all of the data from the IoT is an exercise in big data that boils down to three major steps: data ingestion (harvesting data), data storage, and analytics.”

 

To read a different perspective on these challenges and how Semantic Web technologies play a role in them, read Irene Polikoff’s recent guest post, “RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things.

 

Read more here.

Google’s Nest Labs Contributes to Internet of Things

photo of Nest  ThermostatPreviously, it was reported on SemanticWeb.com that Google had acquired Nest Labs. Steve Lohr of The New York Times recently opined that: “Google did not pay $3.2 billion for Nest Labs this year just because it designed a smart thermostat that has redefined that humble household device. No, Google also bought into the vision of Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, a pair of prominent Apple alumni, that the Nest thermostat is one step toward what they call the conscious home. That means a home brimming with artificial intelligence, whose devices learn about and adapt to its human occupants, for greater energy savings, convenience and security. Last Friday, Nest moved to broaden its reach in the home, buying a fast-growing maker of Internet-connected video cameras, DropCam, for $555 million. And on Tuesday, Nest is expected to announce a software strategy backed by manufacturing partners and a venture fund from Google Ventures and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.”

The author added: “Nest’s is the third high-profile announcement this month about software to link devices in the home in a network known as the consumer Internet of Things. At its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, Apple introduced HomeKit, its technology for linking and controlling smart home devices. HomeKit uses the iOS operating system, the software engine of iPhones and iPads. Quirky, a start-up that manufactures and sells products based on crowdsourced ideas, on Monday announced the creation of a separate software company, Wink. Its initiative has attracted the backing of a major retailer, Home Depot, and manufacturers like General Electric, Honeywell and Philips.

Read more here.

Photo courtesy: flickr/jbritton

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