Internet of Things

How the Semantic Web Will Change News

Old NewsPaul Sparrow of AJR.org recently wrote, “In his book ‘Weaving the Web,’ Tim Berners-Lee described the semantic web. ‘I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web — the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A ‘Semantic Web,’ which makes this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The ‘intelligent agents’ people have touted for ages will finally materialize.’ The question is, will the provider of that customized information be a media company or a technology company? A new wave of change is sweeping the media landscape, and news organizations will need to make radical changes if they want to survive this tsunami of media transformation.” Read more

Halloween Scares Of Another Variety

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peddhapati/

What could be scarier than a haunted house on Halloween, packed with ghouls, axe murderers and the standard array of blood and guts?

Well, maybe the real fright night lies with technology. Consider the following scares that might just send Michael Myers himself into a terror tizzy:

  • Artificial intelligence. Tesla, Paypal and SpaceX founder Elon Musk, as reported in this article in Mashable, recently told an audience at MIT’s Centennial Symposium that, “With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon.” Musk said to attendees that he probably ranks AI as our biggest existential threat, commenting that, “In all those stories where there’s the guy with the pentagram and the holy water, it’s like, ‘Yeah, he’s sure he can control the demon.’ Doesn’t work out.”

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What Will The Internet of Things Look Like in 2020?

5436515880_784b02af11_bDr. Mahesh Saptharishi of Forbes recently wrote, “Communication, in its many forms, has tremendous power… When you combine language with the Internet, you see how our lives have changed; we are freed from past limitations of distance, time and memory. Sensors give us an even greater opportunity to experience our world. The Internet-of-Things (IoT), as these connected sensors are collectively called, has enabled the digitization of language communicated by the physical world. Sensors allow the Internet to instantly extend the reach of our sight and sound. The data from sensors allow us to not only interactively, but also observationally communicate language.” Read more

Open Garden’s FireChat Adds to the IoT

Open Garden logoKevin Fitchard of Gigaom recently posted that, “Thanks to the popularity of its FireChat hyperlocal messaging app, Open Garden’s networking software has been downloaded into more than 5 million mobile devices around the world. Open Garden believes it now has enough users out there to execute the next the stage of its plan: it wants to use all of these smartphone nodes to create a new network for the internet of things. This concept probably requires some explaining as it doesn’t fit into any of the other IoT networking schemes we’ve written about in the past. Unlike say your smart home, which uses a hub to aggregate a bunch of Zigbee or Wi-Fi connections, or a connected vehicle fleet, which taps into the cellular network, Open Garden’s IoT network would be created through millions of shared connections owned by you, me or anyone else with one of its apps on their smartphones, tablets or PCs.”

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Belkin and Osram Team Up for IoT

belkin logoBelkin International announced, “Belkin International, a leading Internet of Things company, and OSRAM SYLVANIA, a leading global lighting manufacturer, today announced that the two companies have entered into a strategic partnership to collaborate on residential solutions with the OSRAM LIGHTIFY™ smart connected lighting ecosystem and Belkin’s WeMo® home automation ecosystem. OSRAM SYLVANIA will first add WeMo compatibility to the SYLVANIA ULTRA iQ™ BR30 LED light bulb, followed by a broader portfolio of connective lighting products for the home shortly after the launch of OSRAM LIGHTIFY in Europe this fall.”

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Machine Learning Aids the Internet of Things

Mining for gold in ThailandIn a recent article, Mike Kravis explained, “In a previous post I discussed how the Internet of Things (IoT) will radically change your big data strategy. Massive amounts of data from sensors, wearable devices, and other technologies are creating new and exciting opportunities to make better business decisions in real time. However, harvesting all of this data is only half of the equation. Making the data actionable is where real value lies. Traditionally, companies have mined data to look for trends and opportunities. In the world of IoT, searching for nuggets of information in petabyte sized databases is the equivalent of trying to find a needle in a haystack. To help extract value quickly and effectively, companies are turning to machine learning technologies, like big data technologies. However, implementing machine learning successfully can be extremely time consuming and complex. This has given birth to a new breed of vendors who deliver machine learning as a service, allowing customers to quickly implement technologies to turn massive IoT databases into actionable, revenue generating gold mines.”

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Internet of Things Goes Fishing for Eels

Photo of eels for saleKevin Fitchard recently reported that, “That unagi you scarf down at your local sushi restaurant may soon have a link to the internet of things. SK Telecom is working with eel farmers in its native South Korea to develop a system of wirelessly connected water sensors that can be monitored and managed from a smartphone. The first pilot of the IoT aquaculture management system is being tested on an eel farm in Gochang, South Korea this month. A set of sensors in dozens of 20-foot-wide eel tanks wirelessly transmit data on water temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen levels to a sensor hub (in fact, the system probably works similarly to your smart home), which in turn connects to SK Telecom’s LTE network using a machine-to-machine radio.”

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A Venture Capitalist’s Take on the Internet of Things

photo of Nest ProtectDavid Hirsch, co-founder of Metamorphic Ventures, recently wrote for Tech Crunch, “There has been a lot of talk in the venture capital industry about automating the home and leveraging Internet-enabled devices for various functions. The first wave of this was the use of the smartphone as a remote control to manage, for instance, a thermostat. The thermostat then begins to recognize user habits and adapt to them, helping consumers save money. A lot of people took notice of this first-generation automation capability when Google bought Nest for a whopping $3.2 billion. But this purchase was never about Nest; rather, it was Google’s foray into the next phase of the Internet of Things.” Read more

Colorado Learns about The Internet of Things

Still image from the video about Internet of Things (source: New York Times)The Denver Post recently reported that, “After a strong earthquake rattled Napa Valley early Sunday, California device maker Jawbone found out how many of its UP wristband users were shaken from their sleep and stayed up. About 93 percent of its customers within 15 miles of Napa, Calif., didn’t go back to sleep after the 6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m., said Andrew Rosenthal, senior product engineer for wellness at Jawbone. But what use could come from that information? “Why not tell people to go to work at 11 a.m. on Monday,” he said. The anecdote represents just one example of information being generated by what technologists call “The Internet of Things,” a topic Rosenthal and other panelists discussed Tuesday at the Colorado Innovation Network Summit in Denver. The summit continues Wednesday at the Denver Performing Arts Complex.”.

The article also states, “As recently as 2005, most households had “The Internet of Thing” — a desktop or laptop computer connected to the Internet, said Eric Schaefer, general manager of communications, data and mobility for Comcast Communications.

By 2010, “The Internet of Wireless Things” started to appear with the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets. The next phase is what Schaefer called “The Internet of Disjointed Things.” Schaefer described one co-worker who has 25 applications to run items in his home, many on different platforms. He predicts that those systems, by 2020, will communicate and operate with one another and be everywhere, a trend that ever-increasing broadband capacity will allow.”

Read more here.

Britain Capitalizes on Internet of Things?

Photo of the Union Jack courtesy flickr / defenceimagesGerard Grech recently wrote, “When you hear the term “the internet of things”, what immediately comes to mind? If you’ve been following recent stories in the media, you might have it pegged as the Big New Thing to revolutionise all our lives any minute now. Equally, you might be forgiven for thinking it’s a lot of hype generated by overexcited tech types and inflated billion-dollar deals. The truth, as ever, lies somewhere in the middle. The combination of connected products, together with intelligent data analysis, has the potential to transform the way we produce goods, run machinery, manage our cities and improve our lives. The internet of things is a real phenomenon and will take off in much the same way as the worldwide web did back in the 1990s.”

Grech continued, “And, just like the web, the full deployment of IoT across industries will take time, talent and persistence. The question is not whether it is going to happen, but what part the UK will play in it all. Consumers stand to benefit from electricity meters that talk to the grid to get the best deals, and health monitors that provide minute-by-minute data on people’s heart rates. With Google’s acquisition of Nest Labs and Samsung’s recent purchase of SmartThings, we will soon have access to a suite of clever gadgets that will create our future “smart” home. It’s a beguiling vision, albeit one with alarm bells (privacy and security obviously need resolving). But the real power of the internet of things lies beyond eye-catching consumer goods.”

Read more here.

Image courtesy flickr / defenceimages

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