Natural Language Processing

SwiftKey Tries a New Profit Model: Offer Your App for Free

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Parmy Olson of Forbes recently reported, “SwiftKey has just made a gutsy move. The popular Android keyboard app has dropped the $3.99 price tag that’s driven its revenue over the last few years and is going free from here on out. It’s the kind of make-or-break decision that could help it scale up in fast-growing developing markets, and in SwiftKey’s case, also help it in going head-to-head with similar, free technology that Apple will soon offer to iPhone users. ‘We’re focused not only on reaching more users with our powerful technology, but on building great content and features to engage them,’ said the company’s CEO Jon Reynolds in an official statement.” Read more

NSF Funds Claremont McKenna Mathematics Professor to Research Compressive Signal Processing

cmCLAREMONT, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Claremont McKenna College assistant professor of mathematics Deanna Needell has been awarded a prestigious, five-year National Science Foundation CAREER grant of more than $413,000 for her research on the practical application of compressive signal processing (CSP). The grant, from the NSF’s Faculty Early Career Development Program, supports junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Read more

Detecting Pneumonia in ICU Patients with Natural Language Processing

76765412_618a458105Greg Goth of Health Data Management reports, “Researchers at the University of Washington and Microsoft have developed technology that uses natural language processing and machine learning to speed up the diagnosis of pneumonia in ICU patients. Bioinformatics professor Meliha Yetisgen and her colleagues at the university teamed up with Microsoft researcher Lucy Vanderwende on the project, called deCIPHER, using the Microsoft Research Statistical Parsing and Linguistic Analysis Toolkit (Splat).” Read more

What’s Next For Watson Mobile Apps?

ibmwatsonlogoIBM’s quest to build Watson into a business (see our story here) took another step last week when the vendor announced the winners of its 2014 Watson Mobile Developer Challenge to create consumer and business apps with its cognitive computing capabilities.

The winners were GenieMD,  Majestyk Apps,  and Red Ant, whose solutions were focused respectively on the health care, educational and retail markets. But twenty-two other companies with innovative ideas of their own also made it to the finalist stage

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Using Robots to Improve New York’s 311

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Jessica Leber of Co.Exist recently wrote, “Since opening in 2003, New York City’s pioneering 311 center for non-emergency questions and complaints has become a massive operation, handling an average of around 60,000 questions a day via phone, text message, website, and mobile app. That’s added up to more than 180 million queries to date, processed by the hundreds of real, live humans that staff a call center in Manhattan 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Yet it all seems rather antiquated at a time when a quick query to Siri or Google can almost instantly provide answers in other realms of life.” Read more

Big Data Startup Infinite Analytics Maps Your Social Genome

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Deepti Chaudhary of Forbes India recently wrote, “Founded in December 2012, Infinite Analytics is a cloud-based big data company that predicts consumer behaviour based on information shared by users on their social networking sites… Infinite Analytics analyses raw data, maps out a person’s social genome and then gives personalised recommendations to consumer brands that have an online presence. This information, which is collected without breaking privacy laws, allows a retailer to identify and recommend products that will appeal to a customer.” Read more

Klappo Hopes to Improve Health with Its Semantic Platform for Ingredients

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Jasper Hamill of Forbes recently wrote, “Perhaps the diet sector may soon be looking very emaciated indeed, due to the tasty-looking emerging market in health, wellness and nutrition apps… One of the companies hoping to join in this feeding frenzy is Klappo, a London-based startup which describes itself as a ‘semantic platform for ingredients’. I went to visit this fledgling firm at its Shoreditch headquarters to get a sense of what sort of dish it intends to serve this growing industry. ‘Food is our focus,’ explains the firm’s Italian founder and CEO Massimiliano Del Vita. ‘We want to feed proper data to all the companies who want to innovate and give them access to a huge knowledge base about recipes, products and foods so they can build the best apps possible’.” Read more

Nokia Acquires Mapping Startup Desti

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Natalie Gagliordi of ZDnet reports, “It looks like Nokia is expanding its HERE Maps mapping business with its acquisition of the mapping startup Desti, a spinout from SRI International — the same group responsible for Apple’s Siri. This is the Finnish company’s first purchase since it sold its phone-making business to Microsoft last month.  Desti uses artificial intelligence and natural language processing to help travelers find what they’re looking for. For instance, if someone is looking for a low-cost place to stay on a business trip, Desti mines through hotel reviews and descriptions and weeds out the options that would appeal to partying college kids or lovers on a romantic getaway.” Read more

The Strongest Social Assistant in History Microsoft Xiaobing Apprenticed Herself to a Master Crossover

Microsoft strongest social assistant

BEIJING, May 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — As one of the most famous crosstalk groups in China, DeYunShe has been renowned for its stringency in accepting apprentices. But on May 29, 2014, crosstalk master Yu Qian unprecedentedly accepted an artificial intelligence (AI) female apprentice social assistant – Microsoft Xiaobing, a 16-year-old girl with an independent manner raised carefully by Microsoft Search Technology Center Asia (STCA). Read more

University of Sydney Working on NLP Social Media Tools for Suicide Prevention

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Leon Spencer of ZDnet reports, “Social media psychotherapy could be the next big thing in the field of mental health management if the development of a new internet-based tool called CyberMate by the University of Sydney gets off the ground. According to the university, the team behind the CyberMate project will adapt online tracking techniques used by marketing analysts, along with digital social media and internet data to support interventions for young people affected by depression and other mental health issues. The researchers working on the project aim to design algorithms that will give the online tool the ability to screen a young person’s social networking pages such as Facebook or Twitter for comments that may indicate potential self-harm. CyberMate would then act as a quasi-psychotherapist and engage with the young online user, suggesting options for help or support via email or SMS.” Read more

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