Opinion

Keep On Keeping On

“There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things…. Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator, they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.”
–Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1513)

Atlanta's flying car laneIn case you missed it, a series of recent articles have made a Big Announcement:

The Semantic Web is not here yet.

Additionally, neither are flying cars, the cure for cancer, humans traveling to Mars or a bunch of other futuristic ideas that still have merit.

A problem with many of these articles is that they conflate the Vision of the Semantic Web with the practical technologies associated with the standards. While the Whole Enchilada has yet to emerge (and may never do so), the individual technologies are finding their way into ever more systems in a wide variety of industries. These are not all necessarily on the public Web, they are simply Webs of Data. There are plenty of examples of this happening and I won’t reiterate them here.

Instead, I want to highlight some other things that are going on in this discussion that are largely left out of these narrowly-focused, provocative articles.

First, the Semantic Web has a name attached to its vision and it has for quite some time. As such, it is easy to remember and it is easy to remember that it Hasn’t Gotten Here Yet. Every year or so, we have another round of articles that are more about cursing the darkness than lighting candles.

In that same timeframe, however, we’ve seen the ascent and burn out failure of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA), Enterprise Service Buses (ESBs), various MVC frameworks, server side architectures, etc. Everyone likes to announce $20 million sales of an ESB to clients. No one generally reports on the $100 million write-downs on failed initiatives when they surface in annual reports a few years later. So we are left with a skewed perspective on the efficacy of these big “conventional” initiatives.

Read more

Should Microsoft Consider Bill Ruh for Its New CEO?

Ruh_Bill-081_0

Anders Bylund of the Motley Fool recently wrote an article for Daily Finance, stating, “Microsoft is looking for a new CEO as current leader Steve Ballmer polishes his golden scepter to a high shine. Ballmer will retire before August 2014, and it’s high time to find a replacement. Reuters claims to have the inside track on a few hot names. The news bureau’s anonymous sources say Microsoft’s headhunters started out with more than 40 external candidates and plenty of insiders on their wish list but have narrowed it down to a handful of internal names and about five outsiders.” Read more

Why Scale is Losing Importance

Greg Satell of Forbes recently wrote, “Digital technology has markedly evened out the playing field. Startups become billion dollar companies overnight while venerable brands like Kodak and Blockbuster hit the skids. This turn of events presents considerable challenges for managers.  While there are still some advantages to scale, the disadvantages often outweigh them.  You have lots of customers, a large workforce and stodgy institutional investors to keep happy, all of which contribute to strategic rigidity.  To compete in the new economy, we need a new playbook.” Read more

Say Hello to the “Mood Graph”

Image of various emoji facesEvan Selinger, a Fellow at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology, has posted an article for Wired, in which he discusses the implications of how we have simplified the expression of emotion in the online systems we use, and how those simplified emotions are being tracked, analyzed and used.

Referring to Facebook’s addition earlier this year of a range of emotional expressions beyond “Like” and Bitly’s recent announcement of its “Feelings” tool, Selinger says, “I’m not singling out Facebook or even Bitly here; Google Plus on mobile also offers such expressions, as do a number of other websites and apps. The point is that all these interfaces are now focusing on the emotional aspects of our information diets. To put this development in a broader context: the mood graph has arrived, taking its place alongside the social graph (most commonly associated with Facebook), citation-link graph and knowledge graph (associated with Google), work graph (LinkedIn and others), and interest graph (Pinterest and others).”

Read more

The Future of Search: Semantics & More

Harsha Rao and Deepali Jain of KMWorld recently wrote, “The future of search is to not search at all. This may sound contrarian, but we are on the threshold of search technology that will eliminate the need to explicitly ask for information. Search has come a long way from its initial focus on relevance, to incorporating a social perspective, to heading towards a future of personalization where the Internet will be essentially customized to each user… In 1994, Yahoo! attempted to organize the Internet by creating the first online directory of websites. As the Internet grew, searching for relevant information became a nightmare. In 1998, Larry Page, co-founder of Google, had an idea that revolutionized search on the Internet. Drawing inspiration from citations in academic journals he developed the PageRank algorithm to rank search results by using links on millions of websites to measure the relevance of web pages.” Read more

In Defense of PRISM’s Big Data Strategy

Doug Henschen of Information Week recently shared his thoughts on the less-than-nefarious intent of the NSA’s PRISM Big Data tools. He writes, “It’s understandable that democracy-loving citizens everywhere are outraged by the idea that the U.S. Government has back-door access to digital details surrounding email messages, phone conversations, video chats, social networks and more on the servers of mainstream service providers including Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, YouTube, Skype and Apple. But the more you know about the technologies being used by the National Security Agency (NSA), the agency behind the controversial Prism program revealed last week by whistleblower Edward Snowden, the less likely you are to view the project as a ham-fisted effort that’s ‘trading a cherished American value for an unproven theory,’ as one opinion piece contrasted personal privacy with big data analysis.” Read more

Lucena Research Launches QuantDesk™ Back Tester

Lucena Research, a leading provider of investment decision support technology, today announced the launch of QuantDesk™ Back Tester, the trading strategy simulator component of QuantDesk™. QuantDesk™ Back Tester is a realistic market simulator that allows investors to test trading strategies over critical market periods. Back Tester represents a fourth component of Lucena’s flagship QuantDesk™ cloud-based platform, which allows users to build a strategy using Lucena’s modular algorithms such as scanning, forecasting, optimizing and hedging to help investment professionals validate and refine quantitative investment strategies. Read more

3 Transformations of IT

David Hill of Network Computing recently shared his theory on the three transformations of IT. He writes, “The first was the digitization of business. The second is the continuing digitization of human experience. The third stage is the digitization of machines. Each transformation is ongoing, builds upon the others, and may overlap. Thus, some technologies that formed a foundation earlier are still active. For example, the mainframe is still alive and well, even in the time of mobile computing. Even though specific technologies provide a frame of reference, these transformations span a broad perspective and are not dependent upon any one technology. Please also note that there is not a smooth transition to each transformation, but that elements of a later transformation may be present while the key transformation of an earlier era is still more prominent.” Read more

The Downfall of Facebook Graph Search?

Matthew Syrett of PBS Media Shift recently shared his thoughts on the flaws of Facebook’s graph search. He writes, “With Graph Search, Facebook intends to mine our social networks to unlock knowledge stored among our online friends to create a recommendation search engine. Instead of crawling the Internet to build search indices, Graph Search will use our social media connections, likes, and Check-ins to make search indices to respond to our queries. Using Graph Search, we should be able to find restaurants that have been checked into or liked by our Facebook friends. We can discover movies based upon the likes of our connections, or relevant music. The project strives to be an alternative to everyday search queries we all do to discover things to do or get in our lives — all validated by people we know and trust, and not by unknown reviewers or a faceless algorithm.” Read more

The Future of E-Commerce Data Interpretation: Semantic Markup, or Computer Vision?

How will webpage data be interpreted in the next few years?  The Semantic Web community has high hopes for ever evolving semantic standards to help systems identify and extract rich data found on the web, ultimately making it more useful.  With the announcement of Schema.org support for GoodRelations  in November, it seems clear semantic progress is now being made on the e-commerce front, and at an accelerated rate.  Martin Hepp, founder of GoodRelations, estimates the rate of adoption of rich, structured e-commerce data to significantly increase this year.

diffbot logo and semantic web cubeHowever, Mike Tung, founder and CEO of a data parsing service called DiffBot, has less faith that the standards necessary for a true Semantic Web will ever be completely and effectively implemented.  In an interview on Xconomy he states that for semantic standards to work correctly content owners must markup the content once for the web and a second time for the semantic standards.  This requires extra work, and affords them the opportunity to perform content stuffing (SEO spam).

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>