schema.org

You Can Take An Active Role In Schema.Org

brickHave you wanted to get involved in the schema.org project? Your contribution to the collaborative effort driven by Bing, Google, Yahoo and Yandex for a shared markup vocabulary for web pages is more than welcome. As Dan Brickley, who is developer advocate at Google, noted during his presentation about schema.org’s progress to date at this summer’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference, the “pattern of collaboration with the project [is] we’re trying to push work off on people who are better qualified to do it, and then we mush it all together.”

What is meant by that is that the project is so broad, covering such a huge amount of topics, that the input of experts – whether from the library, media, sports or any other of the multitude of communities whose vocabularies are or aim to be represented – is incredibly valuable, and very much encouraged. In an overview of the 2013-2014 releases, which included TV/radio, civic services, and bibliographic additions, as well as accessibility properties, among others, Brickley related that during the year, “We listened a lot. We listened to people who knew better than us about accessibility, about how broadcast TV and radio are described, about describing social services, about libraries, journals, and ecommerce, and then integrated their suggestions into a unified set of schemas.”

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GitHub Adds schema.org Actions to Email Notifications via JSON-LD

GitHub logoStéphane Corlosquet has noticed that GitHub has added schema.org Actions using the JSON-LD syntax to the notification emails that GitHub users receive.

On Twitter, Corlosquet posted:

Tweet from @scolorquet: "Looks like @github just started to use http://schema.org  actions with JSON-LD in their notifications emails! "

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Schema.Org: The Fire’s Been Lit

schemaorgadoptspecificWhy has schema.org made the following strides since its debut in 2011?

  • In a sample of over 12 billion web pages, 21 percent, or 2.5 billion pages, use it to mark up HTML pages, to the tune of more than 15 billion entities and more than 65 billion triples;
  • In that same sample, this works out to six entities and 26 facts per page with schema.org;
  • Just about every major site in every major category, from news to e-commerce (with the exception of Amazon.com), uses it;
  • Its ontology counts some 800 properties and 600 classes.

A lot of it has to do with the focus its proponents have had since the beginning on making it very easy for webmasters and developers to adopt and leverage the collection of shared vocabularies for page markup. At this August’s 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose, Google Fellow Ramanathan V. Guha, one of the founders of schema.org, shared the progress of the initiative to develop one vocabulary that would be understood by all search engines and how it got to where it is today.

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Deconstructing Google’s Knowledge Graph

Image from Google I/O showing the addition of information into Google's Knowledge Graph using JSON-LD.Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently observed that, “Search is changing – and it’s changing faster than ever. Increasingly, we are seeing organic elements in search results being displaced by displays coming from the Knowledge Graph. Yet the shift from search over documents (e.g. web pages) to search over data (e.g. Knowledge Graph) is still in its infancy. Remember Google’s mission statement: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful. The Knowledge Graph was built to help with that mission. It contains information about entities and their relationships to one another – meaning that Google is increasingly able to recognize a search query as a distinct entity rather than just a string of keywords. As we shift further away from keyword-based search and more towards entity-based search, internal data quality is becoming more imperative.”

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The Four Top Search Providers Unite to Talk Semantic Web

schema dot org logoMark Albertson of the Examiner recently wrote, “It was an unusual sight to be sure. Standing on a convention center stage together were computer engineers from the four largest search providers in the world (Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing, and Yandex). Normally, this group couldn’t even agree on where to go for dinner, but this week in San Jose, California they were united by a common cause: the Semantic Web… At the Semantic Technology and Business Conference is San Jose this week, researchers from around the world gathered to discuss how far they have come and the mountain of work still ahead of them.” Read more

New Schema.org Extension Proposal for the Automotive Industry

Photo: Interior of automobileThere is no doubt about it: Schema.org is a big success. It has motivated hundreds of thousands of Web site owners to add structured data markup to their HTML templates and brought the idea of exchanging structured data over the WWW from the labs and prototypes to real business.

Unfortunately, the support for information about the sales and rental of vehicles, namely cars, motorbikes, trucks, boats, and bikes has been insufficient for quite a while. Besides two simple classes for http://schema.org/Vehicle and http://schema.org/Car with no additional properties, there was nothing in the vocabulary that would help marking up granular vehicle information in new or used car listing sites or car rental offers.

Recently, Mirek Sopek, Karol Szczepański and I have released a fully-fledged extension proposal for schema.org that fixes this shortcoming and paves the ground for much better automotive Web sites in the light of marketing with structured data.

This proposal builds on the following vehicle-related extensions for GoodRelations, the e-commerce model of schema.org:

It adds the core classes, properties and enumerated values for describing cars, trucks, busses, bikes, and boats and their features. For describing commercial aspects of related offers, http://schema.org/Offer already provides the necessary level of detail. Thus, our proposal does not add new elements for commercial features.

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Drupal Deepens Semantic Web Ties

semtechbiz-10th-125sqAmong the mainstream content management systems, you could make the case that Drupal was the first open source semantic CMS out there. At next week’s Semantic Technology and Business Conference, software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet of Acquia, which provides enterprise-level services around Drupal, and Bock & Co. principal Geoffrey Bock will discuss in this session Drupal’s role as a semantic CMS and how it can help organizations and institutions that are yearning to enrich their data with more semantics – for search engine optimization, yes, but also for more advanced use cases.

“It’s very easy to embed semantics in Drupal,” says Bock, who analyses and consults on digital strategies for content and collaboration. At its core it has the capability to manage semantic entities, and in the upcoming version 8 it takes things to a new level by including schema.org as a foundational data type. “It will become increasingly easier for developers to build and deliver semantically enriched environments,” he says, which can drive a better experience both for clients and stakeholders.

Corlosquet, who has taken a leadership role in building semantic web capabilities into Drupal’s core and maintains the RDF module in Drupal 7 and 8, explains that the closer embrace of schema.org in Drupal is of course a help when it comes to SEO and user engagement, for starters. Google uses content marked up using schema.org to power products like Rich Snippets and Google Now, too.

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Add schema.org Actions to Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video — Part 3)

[Editor's note: this is Part 3 of a series. See Part 1 and Part 2]

schema dot org logoIn Part 3 of this series, Jarek Wilkiewicz details activating the small Knowledge Graph (built on Cayley) with Schema.org Actions. He begins by explaining how Actions can be thought of as a combination of “Entities” (things) and “Affordances” (uses). As he defines it, “An affordance is a quality of an object, or an environment, which allows an individual to perform an action.”

For example, an action, might be using the “ok Google” voice command on a mobile device. The even more specific example that Wilkiewicz gives in the video (spoiler alert) is that of using the schema.org concept of potentialAction to trigger the playing of a specific artist’s music in a small music store’s mobile app.

To learn more, and to meet Jarek Wilkiewicz and his Google colleague, Shawn Simister, in person, register for the Semantic Technology & Business Conference where they will present “When 2 Billion Freebase Facts is Not Enough.”

New Open Source Graph Database Cayley Unveiled (Video – Part 2)

Cayley Logo[Editor's note: This is Part 2 of a 3 part series. See Part 1 and Part 3]

Barak Michener, Software Engineer, Knowledge NYC has posted on the Google Open Source Blog about “Cayley, an open source graph database.”: “Four years ago this July, Google acquired Metaweb, bringing Freebase and linked open data to Google. It’s been astounding to watch the growth of the Knowledge Graph and how it has improved Google search to delight users every day. When I moved to New York last year, I saw just how far the concepts of Freebase and its data had spread through Google’s worldwide offices. I began to wonder how the concepts would advance if developers everywhere could work with similar tools. However, there wasn’t a graph available that was fast, free, and easy to get started working with. With the Freebase data already public and universally accessible, it was time to make it useful, and that meant writing some code as a side project.”

The post continues: “Cayley is a spiritual successor to graphd; it shares a similar query strategy for speed. While not an exact replica of its predecessor, it brings its own features to the table:RESTful API, multiple (modular) backend stores such as LevelDB and MongoDB, multiple (modular) query languages, easy to get started, simple to build on top of as a library, and of course open source. Cayley is written in Go, which was a natural choice. As a backend service that depends upon speed and concurrent access, Go seemed like a good fit.”

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How to Build Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video – Part 1)

Photo of Jarek WilkiewiczStraight out of Google I/O this week, came some interesting announcements related to Semantic Web technologies and Linked Data. Included in the mix was a cool instructional video series about how to “Build a Small Knowledge Graph.” Part 1 was presented by Jarek Wilkiewicz, Knowledge Developer Advocate at Google (and SemTechBiz speaker).

Wilkiewicz fits a lot into the seven-and-a-half minute piece, in which he presents a (sadly) hypothetical example of an online music store that he creates with his Google colleague Shawn Simister. During the example, he demonstrates the power and ease of leveraging multiple technologies, including the schema.org vocabulary (particularly the recently announced ‘Actions‘), the JSON-LD syntax for expressing the machine readable data, and the newly launched Cayley, an open source graph database (more on this in the next post in this series).

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