Semantic Search

French Startup Sépage Says the Future of the Web is Semantic

sepageJack Flanagan of Real Business reports, “The future of the web is semantic – at least according to French tech startup Sépage, which specialises in semantic technologies for travel websites. However the little known, little understood technology is still crossing the distance between science and business. Real Business sought comment from Sépage on what this is, and how they’ve built it. Sepage told Real Business, “We believe the potential is immense. Most of today’s digital marketing approaches aren’t actually personalised, even though that’s what they claim ; comparing your basket to thousands of others and cluster you in groups of ‘similar individuals’ can’t really be called personalisation.” Read more

Google, Jetpac, and Deep Learning

jetpacChristian de Looper of TechTimes recently wrote, “Google is buying Jetpac Inc., an business that makes city guides using publicly available Instragram photos. Using that data, Jetpac determines things like the happiest city… Jetpac essentially algorithmically scans users Instagram photos to generate lists like ‘10 Scenic Hikes’ which can be very handy for those travelling in a city they’ve never been to before. Jetpac has created a total of around 6,000 city guides. Not only that, but the app also puts users’ knowledge of cities to the test in a number of quizzes” Read more

Ontotext Improves Its RDF Triplestore, GraphDB™ 6.0

ontotextSofia, Bulgaria (PRWEB) August 20, 2014 – GraphDB™ 6.0 from Ontotext was released today including improvements to the enterprise replication cluster, faster loading speeds, higher update rates and connectors for Lucene, SOLR and Elasticsearch. This release happens to coincide with a name change for this high performance triplestore – GraphDB™ was formerly known as OWLIM. Now, organizations interested in deploying the only mature enterprise resilient RDF triplestore will also benefit from advanced search functionality using the best full-text search engines without additional integration and synchronization efforts. Read more

Famo.us Raises $25M to Help Users Make Apps with JavaScript

fam-300x234Kara Swisher reports on Recode, “Famo.us, an unusual programming startup that allows users to make nifty mobile apps using JavaScript, has raised $25 million in additional funding and added high-profile investor Jerry Murdock to its board. The new round comes after two others — one for $1.1 million and another for $4 million. About $20 million of the new round is in exchange for equity, while $5 million is debt. Along with Murdock — whose investments via Insight Venture Partners have included Nest, Flipboard and Twitter — Samsung Ventures and Javelin Venture Partners are also participating, the company said. The San Francisco-based company is aimed at using JavaScript, the sometimes disrespected programming language, to create a product that is easy to use by a range of developers, even non-techies. To help promulgate that, Famo.us also offers a free online ‘university’ where anyone can learn to program using its tools.” Read more

Yahoo Acquires Local Search App Zofari

zofariMenchie Mendoza of TechTimes recently wrote, “Affectionately described as a ‘Pandora for places,’ Zofari’s acquisition seemed to have attracted less attention when the deal was announced last week. Zofari uses natural language processing, machine learning, and third party data to collect information that matches up the user with places which the user may find interesting. The financial terms of the acquisition have not been revealed. On Zofari’s official site, the company confirmed that four of its employees are joining Yahoo. They are identified as Oliver Su, Shahzad Aziz, Jason Kobilka and Nate Weinstein. ‘After meeting some of the amazing folks on the Yahoo Search team and hearing about their vision, the decision for our team to join Yahoo was an easy one,’ said in the announcement. ‘We can’t talk about what we’re working on yet, but needless to say we are very, very excited’.” Read more

How Semantic Search Predicts the Future

11066925735_dbe0318b25Daniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote his third and final article in a series on the future of marketing and how that future is interwoven with semantic search. Newman writes, “The internet is getting smarter and this growing intelligence and insights is populating a new kind of semantic web that is providing more than just the most relevant results for people searching, but also some key data to marketers that may just tell us about intent. For movie fans out there, you may remember the movie Minority Report. In this Tom Cruise feature film the star would go out and stop crimes before they would happen as intelligence reached a point where it could see a crime that was about to be committed. At the time the concept seemed pretty far fetched, but really this type of intelligence is very similar to how the semantic web may be able to tell you who may be your next big customer.” Read more

Not a Keyword, But a Conversation: The Future of Search

Google HummingbirdDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “In the future, and really even today, the most qualified and successful searches are going to be driven by conversations. When Google Hummingbird was launched, Google used the idea of conversation rather than keyword as one of the biggest evolutions taking place with the new algorithm.  So rather than thinking of search in terms of just the keywords given, Google can now look for meaning behind the words that you enter in your search query. In my last post on the subject I talked about a couple searching out a dining experience and how rather than plugging in just words like ‘Steakhouse’ or ‘Chicago,’ they would today look to plug in ‘Where can we get a great steak in Chicago?’” Read more

A Look Inside The New York Times’ TimesMachine

nytAdrienne Lafrance of The Atlantic reports, “One of the tasks the human brain best performs is identifying patterns. We’re so hardwired this way, researchers have found, that we sometimes invent repetitions and groupings that aren’t there as a way to feel in control. Pattern recognition is, of course, a skill computers have, too. And machines can group data at scales and with speeds unlike anything a human brain might attempt. It’s what makes computers so powerful and so useful. And seeing the structural framework for patterns across vast systems of categorization can be enormously revealing, too.” Read more

What’s The Word On Enterprise Search?

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Context is king – at least when it comes to enterprise search. “Organizations are no longer satisfied with a list of search results — they want the single best result,” wrote Gartner in its latest Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Search report, released in mid-July. The report also says that the research firm estimates the enterprise search market to reach $2.6 billion in 2017.

The leaders list this time around includes Google with its Search Appliance, which Google touts as benefitting from Google.com’s continually evolving technology, thanks to machine learning from billions of search queries. Also on that part of the quadrant is HP Autonomy, which Gartner says is “exceptionally good at handling searches driven by queries that include surmised or contextual information;”  and Coveo and Perceptive Software, both of which are quoted as offering “considerable flexibility for the design of conversational search capabilities, to reduce the ambiguity of results.”

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Native Search is Starting to Step on Google’s Toes

walmart-logo-300x225Benjamin Spiegel of Marketing Land reports, “Historically, consumers have used Google for research in every step of the purchasing process, all the way up the sales funnel… In recent years, however, we have observed some interesting changes in customer behavior — one of the main ones being that consumers are starting to favor native search over Google search for lower-funnel terms. This is something retailers can take advantage of during the upcoming holiday shopping season — and, indeed, year-round.So what exactly is native search? Native search is the search functionality inside the different platforms or websites. Simply put, it’s the search box on e-retail sites like Amazon, Walmart and CVS, or in category sites like Edmunds and Newegg.” Read more

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