Semantic Search

How Semantic Search Predicts the Future

11066925735_dbe0318b25Daniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote his third and final article in a series on the future of marketing and how that future is interwoven with semantic search. Newman writes, “The internet is getting smarter and this growing intelligence and insights is populating a new kind of semantic web that is providing more than just the most relevant results for people searching, but also some key data to marketers that may just tell us about intent. For movie fans out there, you may remember the movie Minority Report. In this Tom Cruise feature film the star would go out and stop crimes before they would happen as intelligence reached a point where it could see a crime that was about to be committed. At the time the concept seemed pretty far fetched, but really this type of intelligence is very similar to how the semantic web may be able to tell you who may be your next big customer.” Read more

Not a Keyword, But a Conversation: The Future of Search

Google HummingbirdDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “In the future, and really even today, the most qualified and successful searches are going to be driven by conversations. When Google Hummingbird was launched, Google used the idea of conversation rather than keyword as one of the biggest evolutions taking place with the new algorithm.  So rather than thinking of search in terms of just the keywords given, Google can now look for meaning behind the words that you enter in your search query. In my last post on the subject I talked about a couple searching out a dining experience and how rather than plugging in just words like ‘Steakhouse’ or ‘Chicago,’ they would today look to plug in ‘Where can we get a great steak in Chicago?’” Read more

A Look Inside The New York Times’ TimesMachine

nytAdrienne Lafrance of The Atlantic reports, “One of the tasks the human brain best performs is identifying patterns. We’re so hardwired this way, researchers have found, that we sometimes invent repetitions and groupings that aren’t there as a way to feel in control. Pattern recognition is, of course, a skill computers have, too. And machines can group data at scales and with speeds unlike anything a human brain might attempt. It’s what makes computers so powerful and so useful. And seeing the structural framework for patterns across vast systems of categorization can be enormously revealing, too.” Read more

What’s The Word On Enterprise Search?

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Context is king – at least when it comes to enterprise search. “Organizations are no longer satisfied with a list of search results — they want the single best result,” wrote Gartner in its latest Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Search report, released in mid-July. The report also says that the research firm estimates the enterprise search market to reach $2.6 billion in 2017.

The leaders list this time around includes Google with its Search Appliance, which Google touts as benefitting from Google.com’s continually evolving technology, thanks to machine learning from billions of search queries. Also on that part of the quadrant is HP Autonomy, which Gartner says is “exceptionally good at handling searches driven by queries that include surmised or contextual information;”  and Coveo and Perceptive Software, both of which are quoted as offering “considerable flexibility for the design of conversational search capabilities, to reduce the ambiguity of results.”

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Native Search is Starting to Step on Google’s Toes

walmart-logo-300x225Benjamin Spiegel of Marketing Land reports, “Historically, consumers have used Google for research in every step of the purchasing process, all the way up the sales funnel… In recent years, however, we have observed some interesting changes in customer behavior — one of the main ones being that consumers are starting to favor native search over Google search for lower-funnel terms. This is something retailers can take advantage of during the upcoming holiday shopping season — and, indeed, year-round.So what exactly is native search? Native search is the search functionality inside the different platforms or websites. Simply put, it’s the search box on e-retail sites like Amazon, Walmart and CVS, or in category sites like Edmunds and Newegg.” Read more

Microsoft Data Architect Talks Azure ML and the Future of Machine Learning

azuremlMary Branscombe of Tech Radar recently wrote, “We had the opportunity to interview Roger Barga, one of the architects of the Azure ML, Microsoft’s machine learning cloud service, to discuss various aspects of the system. ‘The ranking algorithm that’s in our regression module, the same one running Bing search and serving up ranked results,’ Barga told TechRadar Pro. ‘It’s our implementation on Azure but all the heuristics and know-how came from the years of experience running it. The same recommendation module we have in Azure ML is the same recommendation module that serves up in Xbox what player to play against next.’ Azure ML can look at a document, work out what it’s about and look those topics up on Bing. ‘We can say this is a company, this is a person, this is a product,’ explains Barga. ‘That’s the same way Delve will find documents and discussions and messages that you’ll want to see’.” Read more

Semantic Search is the Future of Marketing

droidsDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “Businesses today are largely online and they have in droves taken their web presence from where it was a few years ago which was likely an “Online Brochure” to some type of second generation website that considers trends such as social media, content marketing, and of course search engine optimization. The reason we as business owners do all of this isn’t because we love technology (not all of us, at least), but rather because we know that people are doing more and more of their research about what they want to buy, and who from, online.” Read more

Deep Learning Startup Madbits Acquired by Twitter

MADBITSDerrick Harris of GigaOM reports, “Twitter has acquired a stealthy computer vision startup called Madbits, which was founded by former New York University researchers. Clément Farabet and Louis-Alexandre Etezad-Heydari. Farabet is a protégé of Facebook AI Lab director and New York University professor Yann LeCun, while Etezad-Heydari was advised by Larry Maloney and Eero Simoncelli.” Read more

ReportLinker Selects TopQuadrant as its Data Integration Partner

TopQuadrantRALEIGH, NC – July 28, 2014 – TopQuadrant™, a leading semantic data integration company, today announced that it has added ReportLinker to its growing roster of clients. Organizations such as ReportLinker continue to leverage TopQuadrant’s cutting-edge technology to collaborate on defining and linking enterprise vocabularies, taxonomies and metadata used for information sharing, data integration and search. Read more

Is Baidu Coming for Google?

baidu-logoAviva Rutkin of New Scientist recently wrote, “Rumours have been circulating that the Chinese search engine is developing a bike that could drive itself through packed city streets. The project isn’t ready to be launched yet but Baidu confirmed it is exploring the idea.The news is intriguing, and not just because self-navigating bikes would be cool. Research into autonomous vehicles is yet another way that Baidu is following Google’s model of pushing at the boundaries of artificial intelligence.” Read more

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