Archives: June 2014

Semantic Web Job: Software Development Engineer

Amazon Web Services logo Amazon Web Services is looking for a Software Development Engineer. The job description states, “Every day customers are moving complex workloads and applications to harness the power, availability, and scalability of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Being very customer focused, AWS wants to provide as friction-less a migration path to AWS as possible, to that end we are looking for software engineers to build a world class experience moving complex workloads and applications to AWS seamlessly with as much automation as possible. This is a tall order to discover, analyze, and automate the movement of complex, multi-layer, dependency rich applications to AWS.

Read more

Industry’s First Cognitive Computing App Builder

ApOrchid - VisionApp Orchid Inc recently announced the industry’s first Cognitive Computing app builder. The announcement states, “Emerging from stealth mode, AppOrchid Inc. announced today its disruptive new technology for developing cognitive apps that targets the multi-billion dollar “Internet of Everything” (IoE) market. “The future for enterprise computing lies in intelligent or cognitive apps. In this new “Internet of everything” world, connected devices, social data and massive volumes of free form documents integrate with enterprise applications in real-time. AppOrchid’s groundbreaking products employ Big Data technology and a scalable Knowledge graph model powered with intelligent natural language processing. The end result is human-like intelligence, with a gamified user experience spanning conventional, handheld and wearable devices. This is a watershed moment in Enterprise computing”, said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of AppOrchid Inc.”

Read more

Internet of Things Impacts Big Data

depiction of internet of things objectsAccording to Mike Kavis of Forbes, “Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons. McKinsey Global Institute reports that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion of revenue by 2025. Many people wonder if companies are ready for this explosion of data generated for IoT? As with any new technology, security is always the first point of resistance. I agree that IoT brings a wave of new security concerns but the bigger concern is how woefully prepared most data centers are for the massive amount of data coming from all of the “things” in the near future.”

Kavis went on to write that, “Some companies are still hanging on to the belief that they can manage their own data centers better than the various cloud providers out there. This state of denial should all but go away when the influx of petabyte scale data becomes a reality for enterprises. Enterprises are going to have to ask themselves, “Do we want to be in the infrastructure business?” because that is what it will take to provide the appropriate amount of bandwidth, disk storage, and compute power to keep up with the demand for data ingestion, storage, and real-time analytics that will serve the business needs. If there ever was a use case for the cloud, the IoT and Big Data is it. Processing all of the data from the IoT is an exercise in big data that boils down to three major steps: data ingestion (harvesting data), data storage, and analytics.”

 

To read a different perspective on these challenges and how Semantic Web technologies play a role in them, read Irene Polikoff’s recent guest post, “RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things.

 

Read more here.

July 22 Webinar: Understanding the New World of Cognitive Computing

Register for a chance to win a free pass to the inaugural Cognitive Computing Forum, August 20-21, 2014.DATE: July 22, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees

 This Webinar has passed. The recording is available at our sister publication, DATAVERSITY.net.

About the Webinar

Cognitive Computing is a rapidly developing technology that has reached practical application and implementation. So what is it? Do you need it? How can it benefit your business?

Register Now!In this webinar, co-produced by our sister publication, DATAVERSITY(TM), a panel of experts in Cognitive Computing will discuss the technology, the current practical applications, and where this technology is going. The discussion will start with a review of a recent survey produced by DATAVERSITY on how Cognitive Computing is currently understood by your peers. The panel will also review many components of the technology including:

  • Cognitive Analytics
  • Machine Learning
  • Deep Learning
  • Reasoning
  • And next generation artificial intelligence (AI)

And get involved in the discussion with your own questions to present to the panel.

All webinar registrants will be sent a copy of the soon to be published Research Paper on Cognitive Computing produced by DATAVERSITY and co-authored by Moderator Steve Ardire. Included in the paper is as a coupon code to receive a $200 discount on the first annual Cognitive Computing Forum to be held in San Jose, California August 20 – 21st. All registrants will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a Free Pass to the Cognitive Computing Forum.

Read more

Semantic Web Job: FIS Software Developer

University of Colorado, Boulder - logoThe University of Colorado at Boulder is looking for a FIS Software Developer. The job summary states, “Are you a software developer looking for fun and challenging projects where your initiative is appreciated? Do you have success in data management and development of web applications? Do you like being part of an innovative team where your contributions can make a real difference? At CU-Boulder, we are working on cutting edge projects involving linked data and the semantic web, and we need an experienced software developer to bring their Java expertise to support this exciting collaborative work. As the flagship university of the state of Colorado, CU-Boulder is a dynamic community of scholars and learners with a proud tradition of research and academic excellence. The University’s Office of Faculty Affairs coordinates a variety of activities associated with faculty life and academic programming on the Boulder campus and supports the Faculty Information System (FIS).

Some of the key responsibilities include:

  • Analyze paper and electronic data flows and related business policies to ensure appropriate FIS data management policies, practices and procedures.
  • Responsible for data management tasks including data integration, data movement (ETL), data mining, metadata discovery, data quality management and data security management using tools like the VIVO Harvester.
  • Collaborate with FIS team members on evolving, automating and scaling data management plans and policies.
  • Participate in formal or informal training and professional development to maintain currency and to improve technical expertise in the area of data management.
  • Participate in formal or informal training and professional development to maintain currency and to improve technical expertise in the areas of web application and Semantic Web development.

Find more great semantic technology jobs on our job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented professionals and post a risk-free job listing.

Google’s Nest Labs Contributes to Internet of Things

photo of Nest  ThermostatPreviously, it was reported on SemanticWeb.com that Google had acquired Nest Labs. Steve Lohr of The New York Times recently opined that: “Google did not pay $3.2 billion for Nest Labs this year just because it designed a smart thermostat that has redefined that humble household device. No, Google also bought into the vision of Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, a pair of prominent Apple alumni, that the Nest thermostat is one step toward what they call the conscious home. That means a home brimming with artificial intelligence, whose devices learn about and adapt to its human occupants, for greater energy savings, convenience and security. Last Friday, Nest moved to broaden its reach in the home, buying a fast-growing maker of Internet-connected video cameras, DropCam, for $555 million. And on Tuesday, Nest is expected to announce a software strategy backed by manufacturing partners and a venture fund from Google Ventures and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.”

The author added: “Nest’s is the third high-profile announcement this month about software to link devices in the home in a network known as the consumer Internet of Things. At its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, Apple introduced HomeKit, its technology for linking and controlling smart home devices. HomeKit uses the iOS operating system, the software engine of iPhones and iPads. Quirky, a start-up that manufactures and sells products based on crowdsourced ideas, on Monday announced the creation of a separate software company, Wink. Its initiative has attracted the backing of a major retailer, Home Depot, and manufacturers like General Electric, Honeywell and Philips.

Read more here.

Photo courtesy: flickr/jbritton

Ray Kurzweil, Google Discuss Artificial Intelligence (video)

Photo of Ray Kurzweil presenting at Google I/O 2014Signe Brewster of Gigaom recently wrote, “In 2012, Google hired Ray Kurzweil to build a computer capable of thinking as powerfully as a human. It would require at least one hundred trillion calculations per second — a feat already accomplished by the fastest supercomputers in existence. The more difficult challenge is creating a computer that has a hierarchy similar to the human brain. At the Google I/O conference Wednesday, Kurzweil described how the brain is made up of a series of increasingly more abstract parts. The most abstract — which allows us to judge if something is good or bad, intelligent or unintelligent — is an area that has been difficult to replicate with a computer. A computer can calculate 10 x 20 or tell the difference between a person and a table, but it can’t judge if a person is kind or mean. To get there, humans will need to build computers that can build abstract consciousness from a more concrete level. Humans will program them to recognize patterns, and then from those patterns they will need to be smart enough to learn to understand more.”

Read more

Semantic Technology Job: Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic logoMayo Clinic is seeking a Senior Ontologist. The job description states: “Provide leadership in the development, management and implementation of the Mayo Consumer Vocabulary to support navigation systems, search mechanisms, search engine optimization and personalized delivery of health information and services for Mayo Clinic Global Products and Services. Works collaboratively in cross functional teams to assess ontology needs to support product development across the department. Evaluates content domains, conducts content audits and analysis to inform the ongoing development of the Mayo Consumer Vocabulary. Supervises and directs ontology specialists and manages projects requiring substantial intra-organizational coordination.”

Qualifications for this position include: “Masters of Library and Information Science (MLIS) or comparable degree in areas such as information systems, knowledge management, or computer science is required. Five years experience in ontology/taxonomy development and management. Proven track record of leading ontology/taxonomy implementation for the complete life cycle of a web product or technology. Prefer experience with RDF/OWL, SKOS, and SPARQL. Experience evaluating effectiveness of taxonomies/ontologies in supporting products and services. Experience with taxonomy-management systems. Expertise in: information retrieval/search, information organization and classification, and content or entity extraction. Strong analytical skills; experience with both quantitative and qualitative methods desirable. Demonstrated leadership abilities for managing people and projects. Excellent communication and presentation skills.”

Add schema.org Actions to Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video — Part 3)

[Editor’s note: this is Part 3 of a series. See Part 1 and Part 2]

schema dot org logoIn Part 3 of this series, Jarek Wilkiewicz details activating the small Knowledge Graph (built on Cayley) with Schema.org Actions. He begins by explaining how Actions can be thought of as a combination of “Entities” (things) and “Affordances” (uses). As he defines it, “An affordance is a quality of an object, or an environment, which allows an individual to perform an action.”

For example, an action, might be using the “ok Google” voice command on a mobile device. The even more specific example that Wilkiewicz gives in the video (spoiler alert) is that of using the schema.org concept of potentialAction to trigger the playing of a specific artist’s music in a small music store’s mobile app.

To learn more, and to meet Jarek Wilkiewicz and his Google colleague, Shawn Simister, in person, register for the Semantic Technology & Business Conference where they will present “When 2 Billion Freebase Facts is Not Enough.”

New Open Source Graph Database Cayley Unveiled (Video – Part 2)

Cayley Logo[Editor’s note: This is Part 2 of a 3 part series. See Part 1 and Part 3]

Barak Michener, Software Engineer, Knowledge NYC has posted on the Google Open Source Blog about “Cayley, an open source graph database.”: “Four years ago this July, Google acquired Metaweb, bringing Freebase and linked open data to Google. It’s been astounding to watch the growth of the Knowledge Graph and how it has improved Google search to delight users every day. When I moved to New York last year, I saw just how far the concepts of Freebase and its data had spread through Google’s worldwide offices. I began to wonder how the concepts would advance if developers everywhere could work with similar tools. However, there wasn’t a graph available that was fast, free, and easy to get started working with. With the Freebase data already public and universally accessible, it was time to make it useful, and that meant writing some code as a side project.”

The post continues: “Cayley is a spiritual successor to graphd; it shares a similar query strategy for speed. While not an exact replica of its predecessor, it brings its own features to the table:RESTful API, multiple (modular) backend stores such as LevelDB and MongoDB, multiple (modular) query languages, easy to get started, simple to build on top of as a library, and of course open source. Cayley is written in Go, which was a natural choice. As a backend service that depends upon speed and concurrent access, Go seemed like a good fit.”

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>