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Ron Callari of Inventor Spot recently wrote, “It’s hard to say, looking twenty to thirty years into the future, just how different the digital landscape will look. Semantic Technology, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Web 3.0 are presently only toddling along in their infant stage. What they will look like in the next few decades is only guesswork on our part.  However if we were pressed to gamble on the outcome, a smart man’s wager might be that the last two digital super powers left standing will be Google and Facebook [with the possible exception of China]. A CNN Money report describes this evolution as analogous to the ‘Cold War,’ to conjure up imagery of what transpired between America and the Soviet Union, post World War II.”

 

Callari continues, “Similar to the chilly relationship between those two Super Powers, ‘Facebook and Google are locked in a high-stakes, multi-billion dollar battle to shape the future — spending like crazy on emerging technologies [so that, when] their current businesses are disrupted — and they will be — they’ll have a fallback plan.’ My recent blog post, Taking Stock In Facebook May Virtually Have Nothing To Do With Facebook, points to Facebook’s latest acquisition supporting that supposition. Spending $2 billion for the virtual reality company Oculis Rift might seem incongruous with Facebook’s current goals, at first blush – but after drilling down to the motive, it begins to make sense. CEO Mark Zuckerberg is wise enough to know that nothing lasts forever, and if he doesn’t map out a ‘what-comes-next’ strategy now, he may end up – down the road – like one of his previous flawed competitors – MySpace.”

 

Read more here.

 

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ birgerking