In the market for a job where your semantic web skills will shine? For a fun Friday exercise, let’s see how geographically desirable you are, based on information from tech job search engine Dice.com.

As of yesterday, the site listed only a couple dozen “semantic web” jobs, but a broader search on “semantic” pulls up over 200.  Without combing through each entry to see just how semantic every one is, would you be surprised to learn that California takes the lead, with close to 50?


But before you pack your bags and start heading for the Left Coast, there’s only a handful more jobs outside the Golden State.It’s the states up and down the East Coast that represent the biggest swath of jobs, with a shade over 100 postings. Virgina, Massachusetts, and D.C. make notable contributions to the load.

That said, some of the eye-catchers on both sides of the country are with some prominent consumer names. In  Washington state, for instance, Amazon.com is looking to supplement the web shopping experience with talent that can help drive integration with IMDB, DPReview, and Wikipedia, extract semantic information and map it to Amazon.com products so that it surfaces in relevant ways on the site. And Orbitz in D.C. needs a lead UI engineer who  is “extremely familiar with advanced CSS concepts and techniques, including building table-free layouts using semantic markup and CSS.”

But equally interesting are some ventures taking place off the coastal cities. A few dozen jobs await away from our ocean borders.

Consider, for example, that there are 5 openings at the Round Rock offices of Dell alone. As you may have seen, Dell will be speaking about bringing semantic projects into the enterprise at the SemTech conference in June, and we hope to provide a little preview of that in the not-too-distant future. And Chicago appears to be its own little hotbed of semantic-related opportunities.

About half of our 50 glorious states seem to offer the promise of employment that makes some accommodation for the age of semantics, according to what we found. Add that to today’s jobs report for February that told use we’d see continued growth in employment, and I’d say that’s not bad news with which to start your weekend.

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