Simon Rogers reports that the National Audit Office has released its report on the United Kingdom’s open government data project. Rogers writes, “This should be a good week for open government data in the UK. The British government is one of the key drivers in the Open Government Partnership, presently meeting in Brasilia, where it is being lauded for the way it has released a ‘tsunami of data’. And yet, according to the National Audit Office, all is not entirely rosy. Read between the lines of its report out today, Implementing Transparency, and you will see a government which has been chucking out tonnes of data, that no-one looks at and without a complete strategy. Oh and it’s cost an awful lot of money.”

He continues, “The report praises the government for the sheer amount of information that it has released. Data.gov.uk now has 8,300 datasets on it – compared to 5,786 on data.gov (the US version). It has become possibly the biggest government-owned open data site in the world. At the same time, the government has done most of what it said it would. David Cameron wrote two open letters to heads of departments in May 2010, having just come into power, and in July 2011 – you can read the text here. They called for the releases of key datasets, and the report finds that 23 out of 25 key commitments had been achieved.”

Read more here.

Image: Courtesy Data.gov.uk