Still image from the video about Internet of Things (source: New York Times)The Denver Post recently reported that, “After a strong earthquake rattled Napa Valley early Sunday, California device maker Jawbone found out how many of its UP wristband users were shaken from their sleep and stayed up. About 93 percent of its customers within 15 miles of Napa, Calif., didn’t go back to sleep after the 6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m., said Andrew Rosenthal, senior product engineer for wellness at Jawbone. But what use could come from that information? “Why not tell people to go to work at 11 a.m. on Monday,” he said. The anecdote represents just one example of information being generated by what technologists call “The Internet of Things,” a topic Rosenthal and other panelists discussed Tuesday at the Colorado Innovation Network Summit in Denver. The summit continues Wednesday at the Denver Performing Arts Complex.”.

The article also states, “As recently as 2005, most households had “The Internet of Thing” — a desktop or laptop computer connected to the Internet, said Eric Schaefer, general manager of communications, data and mobility for Comcast Communications.

By 2010, “The Internet of Wireless Things” started to appear with the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets. The next phase is what Schaefer called “The Internet of Disjointed Things.” Schaefer described one co-worker who has 25 applications to run items in his home, many on different platforms. He predicts that those systems, by 2020, will communicate and operate with one another and be everywhere, a trend that ever-increasing broadband capacity will allow.”

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