Richard Wallis recently commented on the incorporation of linked data and linked open data at libraries. Wallis writes, “Last summer, it was great to play a small part in the release of the British National Bibliography as Linked Data by the British Library – openly available via Talis and their Kasabi Platform.  Late last year the Library of Congress announced that Linked Data and RDF was on their roadmap, soon followed by the report and plan from Stanford University with Linked Data at its core.  More recently still, Europeana have opened up access to a large amount of cultural heritage, including library, data. Even more recently I note that OCLC, at their EMEA Regional Council Meeting in Birmingham this week, see Linked Data as an important topic on the library agenda.”

He continues, “The consequence of this rise interest in library Linked Data is that the community is now exploring and debating how to migrate library records from formats such as Marc into this new RDF.  In my opinion there is a great danger here of getting bogged down in the detail of how to represent every scintilla of information from a library record in every linked data view that might represent the thing that record describes.  This is hardly unsurprising as most engaged in the debate come from an experience where if something was not preserved on a physical or virtual record card, it would be lost forever.   By concentrating on record/format transformation I believe that they are using a Linked Data telescope to view their problem, but are not necessarily looking through the correct end of that telescope.”

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Image: Courtesy Flickr/ Peter Huys