Near the end of August Kyield founder Mark Montgomery was granted an artificial intelligence patent by the USPTO, titled “Modular System for Optimizing Knowledge Yield In the Digital Workplace.” Kyield is developing a modular and interoperable semantic system that aims at delivering a higher level of yield for the knowledge worker. The new patent’s value, Montgomery says, can be found in filters for semantically managing data quantity and quality, and continually adjusting the consumption of data that can be automatically collected and audited on the web, intranets, or wireless devices. Those filters – think of them as data valves – apply to all three modules represented in the patent.

“There’s a correct assumption that the performance of your organization in the future, even now, is going to be dependent on how you manage your data,” Montgomery says. “Data represents everything in your organization – your intellectual assets, customers, employees, knowledge workers. Everything is digitized now. We’ve created this exponential growth of data and this system lets you mange that data for the entire organization in an adaptable manner.”

Data – especially big data, today’s blessing and curse – has to be structured to be managed. “If you had structured data from the get-go, that is, semantics, then you can structure the data as you want to in your organization, and an individual can manage his own world, too,” he says. The three modules include a semi-automated one dubbed the CKO. or Chief Knowledge Officer Module, which Montgomery says acts like the brains for structured data for the entire organization. “The CKO module is very important as most of the really pressing problems in our world must include this functionality (crisis prevention, expedited discovery in science, innovation),” he says. Another module is for the organization’s groups, and another is for individuals. Each module can stand alone, with the individual module for each knowledge worker populating the data.

Embedded software in each module governs the relationships between each one. “Adaptable valves mixing semantic languages that describe those relationships were key,” he says. “The ability to manage your data for your whole organization or for the individual knowledge worker is essential to achieve every goal in your mission statement.”

The building-block, plug-and-play engineering with data standards are essential to increased efficiencies in computing, reduced integration, reduction of complexity, and lower TCO, Montgomery says.

While it’s important for data to be structured properly, what is ultimately important is what is done with that data, he says.”With Kyield and this patent, it’s primarily about managing structured data, and by extension managing ourselves and our organizations at a much higher level than what has been possible to date,” he says. “This includes enabling much richer visualization of metrics in the digital workplace, continuous improvement for the entire organization, and much more accurate predictive capabilities.”

Montgomery plans to license the system on a non-exclusive basis and to build out a new ecosystem to include smaller developers.