Cover of Linked Data book by David Wood et alThis week, Manning Publications is launching the book “Linked Data,” by David Wood, Marsha Zaidman, Luke Ruth, and Michael Hausenblas.

As part of that launch, Manning is offering a one-day 50% discount for readers of SemanticWeb.com. The discount applies to all versions of “Linked Data”: eBook, print books, and Manning’s “MEAP” books (more on MEAP below). To claim the discount, use coupon code “12linksw” when ordering.

This offer expires at 11:59 pm (US EST) on December 6, so if you’re interested, act fast!

About the Book (description by David Wood):

The flexible, unstructured nature of the Web is being extended to act as a global database of structured data. Linked Data is a standards-driven model for representing structured data on the Web that gives developers, publishers, and information architects a consistent, predictable way to publish, merge and consume data. The Linked Data model offers the potential to standardize Web data in the same way that SQL standardized large-scale commercial databases. Linked Data has been adopted by many well-known institutions, including Google, Facebook, IBM, Oracle and government agencies, as well as popular Open Source projects such as Drupal.

Linked Data” presents the Linked Data model in plain, jargon-free language to Web developers. Avoiding the overly-academic terminology of the Semantic Web, this new book presents practical techniques using everyday tools like JavaScript and Python. You’ll work step-by-step through examples of increasing complexity as you explore foundational concepts such as HTTP URIs,  the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the SPARQL query language. Then you’ll use various Linked Data document formats to create powerful Web applications and mashups. This book teaches you how to effectively use emerging Web standards to find, query, use and create structured data on the Web.

What’s inside

  • Find Linked Data you can reuse
  • Use Linked Data in your applications
  • Create your own Linked Data
  • Build Linked Data applications using standard Web techniques

The launch of Schema.org in June 2011 by Google, Microsoft and Yahoo! and the publication of Linked Data by retailers such as Best Buy, Sears and Volkswagen brought Linked Data into the mainstream.  This book includes chapters that explore these important commercial use cases and shows how Linked Data is used for search engine optimization (SEO).

Written for Web developers by Web developers, this book requires no previous exposure to Linked Data technologies.

About the authors

Photo of David Wood David Wood architected the first large-scale RDF database, re-architected the Persistent URL service (http://purl.org, http://purlz.org) to support Linked Data, and co-founded the Callimachus Project. He is co-chair of the World Wide Web Consortium’s RDF Working Group.
photo of Marsha Zaidman Marsha Zaidman is Associate Professor Emerita of Computer Science at the University of Mary Washington, where she served as chair of the Department of Computer Science from 1997 to 2009.
Photo of Luke Ruth Luke Ruth is a Linked Data developer supporting the Callimachus Project).
Photo of Michael Hausenblas Michael Hausenblas leads the Linked Data Research Centre in Galway, Ireland. He is the project coordinator of the European Commission FP7 Support Action LOD Around-The-Clock (LATC) and other W3C standardization activities.

About Manning Publication’s MEAP program

MEAP stands for “Manning Early Access Program” and when buying this option, readers “…get early access to the book, chapter by chapter, as soon as they become available…get an opportunity to participate in the most sensitive, final piece of the publishing cycle by offering feedback to the author…After all chapters are released, you will be able to download the complete edited ebook. If you order the print edition, we will ship it to you upon release, direct from the bindery, weeks before it is widely available elsewhere.”

Remember, use code “12linksw” to claim the 50% discount before December 6, 2013.