Rebecca Grant of VentureBeat reports, “Scoop.it has scooped up $2.6 million to mold vast amounts of Internet content into more manageable form. The company combines semantic analysis with human curation to help brands publish relevant content. Its technology crawls 10 million pages across the Web, analyzes it, and makes personalized content suggestions for users based on their areas of interest. Users pick and choose the items they find interesting or relevant and publish them to their personal or organizational site. ‘A growing number of people, professionals, businesses and brands have to publish online to develop their visibility, reputation, and brand,’ said founder Guillaume Decugis in an interview with VentureBeat. ‘This is time-consuming, and it is hard to produce relevant quality content to rise above the noise. We help them find content that relates to their areas of expertise so they can feed their sites, social media channels, search engines, and newsletter’s.”

Grant continues, “Decugis offered the example of an architect who uses Scoop.it to find and post content that relates to her specific area of expertise — sustainable architecture. She uses the engine to publish a daily update of current technologies, case studies, events, projects, and design strategies, such as a green rooftop on an art museum in Seoul or an initiative to promote solar homes in the desert. Organizations like the University of California, San Francisco are also using Scoop.it to curate content generated by or about their faculty, students, and community.”

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Image: Courtesy Scoop.it