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Jobs are in the news. But the national jobs market is background noise. We want to know the job trends related to our skill sets. We dug around in the job search engines, Indeed and SimplyHired, to see what trends jump out. Bad news: Semantic Web is not as hot as Twitter. Oh, you already know that? Good news: semantic jobs are on the rise.

This Is What Hot Job Market Looks Like

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Semantic Trend Looks Good

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Dig A Bit Deeper: RDF Job Trends

Looks a bit choppy but the trend line is positive:

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This of course is not a semantic job search engine and when you look at some of the jobs that come from searching on RDF, you get many that have nothing to do with Resource Description Framework.For example this job does not look very helpful:

Marketing Specialist (RDF) – Sports Sales & Marketing
Sports Industry Employer – Foothill Ranch, CA
main responsibility of the RDF Marketing Specialist will be to assure that RDF initiatives run in the most… Manage the RDF budget. * Redirect and coordinate RDF…
From WorkInSports.com

Who knows what jobs would pop up if we searched on “owl”. There might be some interesting change of career options in being a vet or endangered species conservation specialist.

So lets try SPARQL.

SPARQL On The Rise

SPARQL Job Trend.png

Looking through a few pages of results we see only software jobs. And most of the jobs also reference RDF and OWL. A typical description will be something like:

“Semantic Web Technologies o SPARQL, RDF, RDFa, OWL”

So SPARQL looks like a good proxy. But some people building semantic systems don’t like SPARQL, so it is far from perfect.

Tell Us What You Want To See

We plan to do more research on semantic job trends. Tell us what you would find interesting. Do you know of other good sources of data on this?

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