Posts Tagged ‘AI’

Artificial Intelligence Pushes Ahead in China

Baidu logoA recent press release revealed that, “There are signs indicating that Chinese Internet users might be the very first group of people to truly reap the benefits of artificial intelligence. The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, written by Ray Kurzweil, painted us a picture of artificial intelligence. Kurzweil describes his law of accelerating returns which predicts an exponential increase in technologies; in the book he says this will lead to a technological singularity in the year 2045, a point where progress is so rapid it outstrips humans’ ability to comprehend it. Baidu, the leading Chinese search service provider, recently announced their ground-breaking Light App (a modified kind of web app), the Baidu Exam-Info Master. Using the artificial intelligence of their search engine, Baidu seeks to offer some practical help to high school seniors when it comes to applying for their dream college after the National College Entrance Examination. This service has soon become wildly popular among users, and may grow into a key motivation for Baidu to duplicate this kind of method into a far broader area.”

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Adventure Game Uses Natural Language Understanding

Graphic of the Natural Language Understanding technical flow.An article written by Eugene Joseph of Gamasutra reveals that, “Bot Colony is an episodic single player adventure game that we launched on Steam’s Early Access on June 17. It has the distinction of being the first game that integrates unrestricted English dialogue into the game experience. While the Bot Colony Natural Language Understanding (NLU) pipeline cannot yet handle everything a player throws at it, it is able to understand enough that cooperative players can complete the game’s episodes (versions of the first two are available now on Steam Early Access). Language understanding is not limited to the minimum required to play the game – we actually hope that players will explore the boundaries of AI understanding and probe just how much a Bot Colony robot understands.”
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The Future of Personalization

[Editor's Note: This guest article comes to us from Dr. Nathan Wilson, CTO of Nara. ]

Photo of Thomas Jefferson statue and modern person with smart device The Problem: Information has run amok.

There once was a time when the busiest and greatest minds –the Jeffersons, Hemingways and Darwins – would have time in their day for long walks, communion with nature, and leisurely handwritten correspondence. Today we awaken each day to an immediate cacophony of emails, tweets, websites and apps that are too numerous to navigate with full consciousness. Swimming in wires, pixels, data bits, and windows with endless tabs is toxic to you and to me, and the problem continues to escalate.

How do you connect to this teeming network without electrocuting your brain? “Filtering” is a simple, but ultimately blinding, approach that shields us from important swaths of knowledge. “Forgetting faster” is potentially a valid solution, but also underserves our mindfulness.

A History of Attempted Solutions So Far: How have we tried to solve information glut so far, and why is each solution inadequate?

Phase 1 – The Web as a Linnaean Taxonomy (1994-2000)

The first method to deal with our information explosion came in “Web 1.0” when portals like Yahoo! arose to elegantly categorize information that you could explore at your leisure. For instance, one could find information on the New England Patriots by following a trail of breadcrumbs from “Sports” to “Football” to “AFC East” and finally “New England Patriots” where you were presented with a list of topical websites.

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July 22 Webinar: Understanding the New World of Cognitive Computing

Register for a chance to win a free pass to the inaugural Cognitive Computing Forum, August 20-21, 2014.DATE: July 22, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees

 

About the Webinar

Cognitive Computing is a rapidly developing technology that has reached practical application and implementation. So what is it? Do you need it? How can it benefit your business?

Register Now!In this webinar, co-produced by our sister publication, DATAVERSITY(TM), a panel of experts in Cognitive Computing will discuss the technology, the current practical applications, and where this technology is going. The discussion will start with a review of a recent survey produced by DATAVERSITY on how Cognitive Computing is currently understood by your peers. The panel will also review many components of the technology including:

  • Cognitive Analytics
  • Machine Learning
  • Deep Learning
  • Reasoning
  • And next generation artificial intelligence (AI)

And get involved in the discussion with your own questions to present to the panel.

All webinar registrants will be sent a copy of the soon to be published Research Paper on Cognitive Computing produced by DATAVERSITY and co-authored by Moderator Steve Ardire. Included in the paper is as a coupon code to receive a $200 discount on the first annual Cognitive Computing Forum to be held in San Jose, California August 20 – 21st. All registrants will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a Free Pass to the Cognitive Computing Forum.

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Google’s Nest Labs Contributes to Internet of Things

photo of Nest  ThermostatPreviously, it was reported on SemanticWeb.com that Google had acquired Nest Labs. Steve Lohr of The New York Times recently opined that: “Google did not pay $3.2 billion for Nest Labs this year just because it designed a smart thermostat that has redefined that humble household device. No, Google also bought into the vision of Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, a pair of prominent Apple alumni, that the Nest thermostat is one step toward what they call the conscious home. That means a home brimming with artificial intelligence, whose devices learn about and adapt to its human occupants, for greater energy savings, convenience and security. Last Friday, Nest moved to broaden its reach in the home, buying a fast-growing maker of Internet-connected video cameras, DropCam, for $555 million. And on Tuesday, Nest is expected to announce a software strategy backed by manufacturing partners and a venture fund from Google Ventures and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.”

The author added: “Nest’s is the third high-profile announcement this month about software to link devices in the home in a network known as the consumer Internet of Things. At its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, Apple introduced HomeKit, its technology for linking and controlling smart home devices. HomeKit uses the iOS operating system, the software engine of iPhones and iPads. Quirky, a start-up that manufactures and sells products based on crowdsourced ideas, on Monday announced the creation of a separate software company, Wink. Its initiative has attracted the backing of a major retailer, Home Depot, and manufacturers like General Electric, Honeywell and Philips.

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Photo courtesy: flickr/jbritton

Ray Kurzweil, Google Discuss Artificial Intelligence (video)

Photo of Ray Kurzweil presenting at Google I/O 2014Signe Brewster of Gigaom recently wrote, “In 2012, Google hired Ray Kurzweil to build a computer capable of thinking as powerfully as a human. It would require at least one hundred trillion calculations per second — a feat already accomplished by the fastest supercomputers in existence. The more difficult challenge is creating a computer that has a hierarchy similar to the human brain. At the Google I/O conference Wednesday, Kurzweil described how the brain is made up of a series of increasingly more abstract parts. The most abstract — which allows us to judge if something is good or bad, intelligent or unintelligent — is an area that has been difficult to replicate with a computer. A computer can calculate 10 x 20 or tell the difference between a person and a table, but it can’t judge if a person is kind or mean. To get there, humans will need to build computers that can build abstract consciousness from a more concrete level. Humans will program them to recognize patterns, and then from those patterns they will need to be smart enough to learn to understand more.”

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Top Tech Companies Setting Their Sights on True Artificial Intelligence

Facebook

Brandon Bailey of San Jose Mercury News reports, “The latest Silicon Valley arms race is a contest to build the best artificial brains. Facebook, Google and other leading tech companies are jockeying to hire top scientists in the field of artificial intelligence, while spending heavily on a quest to make computers think more like people. They’re not building humanoid robots — not yet, anyway. But a number of tech giants and startups are trying to build computer systems that understand what you want, perhaps before you knew you wanted it. ‘It’s important to position yourself in this market for the next decade,’ said Yann LeCunn, a leading New York University researcher hired to run Facebook’s new A.I. division in December. ‘A lot is riding on artificial intelligence and content analysis, and on being smarter about how people and computers interact’.” Read more

Artificial Intelligence to Make Lawyers Redundant: Ipselex Launches an API for Law

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Hong Kong, Hong Kong (PRWEB) April 03, 2014–Ipselex, until now a secretive Hong Kong artificial intelligence company, today announced the launch of its web platform. The platform offers API-like access to a brain in the cloud that has taught itself to understand and make predictions about patents and patent applications.

 

Combining state of the art natural language processing with neural network technology designed to simulate a human brain, the AI at the core of Ipselex has learned what makes a good patent through a mix of self-study and guidance from an experienced patent attorney. It can, for example, analyze products for infringement and, in certain industry sectors, estimate the likelihood that a given patent application will be granted. Read more

Introducing NEIL, Another Step Forward in AI

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Dean Evans of Tech Radar reports, “How, for example, does a computer know what a car looks like? We just know. We’ve built up that knowledge over time by observing lots of cars. Consequently, we know that not all cars look the same. We know that they come in different shapes, sizes and colours. But we can generally recognise a car because they have consistent and definable elements – wheels, tyres, an engine, windscreen and wing mirrors, they travel on roads, and so on. Could a computer learn all this information in the same way? A team working at Carnegie Mellon University in the United States believes so. It has developed a system called NEIL (Never Ending Image Learner), an ambitious computer program that can decipher the content of photos and make visual connections between them without being taught. Just like a human would.” Read more

Google is Investing Heavily in AI, the Internet of Things

Google

Scott Raynovich of CMS Wire recently wrote, “Boston Dynamics, Nest and DeepMind. In the past month, Google has gone on yet another acquisition binge, spending at least $4 billion on a trio of startups that seem only loosely connected — robotics, home automation and artificial intelligence, respectively. Is there a central strategy, and what does it mean to the future of Google, the Internet of Things and Customer Experience? Based on a pattern of deals and feedback from leading experts, it appears Google believes the future is heavily connected to data gathering, machine learning and automation, which all of these companies have in common. ‘In a broader pattern, if Google is focusing on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, how is this kind of semantic understanding going to help us make decisions faster and do our jobs,’ said David Schubmehl, a research director with International Data Corp. (IDC).” Read more

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