Posts Tagged ‘AlchemyVision’

AlchemyAPI’s New Face Detection And Recognition API Boosts Entity Information Courtesy Of Its Knowledge Graph

AlcaclhinfohemyAPI has released its AlchemyVision Face Detection/Recognition API, which, in response to an image file or URI, returns the position, age, gender, and, in the case of celebrities, the identities of the people in the photo and connections to their web sites, DBpedia links and more.

According to founder and CEO Elliot Turner, it’s taking a different direction than Google and Baidu with its visual recognition technology. Those two vendors, he says in an email response to questions from The Semantic Web Blog, “use their visual recognition technology internally for their own competitive advantage.  We are democratizing these technologies by providing them as an API and sharing them with the world’s software developers.”

The business case for those developers to leverage the Face Detection/Recognition API include that companies can use facial recognition for demographic profiling purposes, allowing them to understand age and gender characteristics of their audience based on profile images and sharing activity, Turner says.

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AlchemyAPI Launches Deep Learning API-Based Service, AlchemyVision

Alchemy API

Derrick Harris of GigaOM reports, “Denver-based startup AlchemyAPI is keeping proactive in the world of artificial intelligence, launching on Monday night a new service that lets users perform computer vision tasks such as image-tagging and photo search via API. The product, called AlchemyVision, is the company’s first foray outside the natural-language processing space where it has focused since 2011. It also probably foreshadows a spate of computer vision services yet to come. AlchemyAPI first demonstrated its object recognition service in September but Turner said the company has done a lot of work in the meantime to get it ready for commercial use. Among the big differences is the sheer scale of the new system, which is running unsupervised across millions of online images and using context from the pages they’re housed on in order to determine what they are.” Read more