Posts Tagged ‘Amazon Web Services’

Setting Government Data Free

taAs July 4 approaches, the subject of open government data can’t help but be on many U.S. citizens’ minds. That includes the citizens who are responsible for opening up that data to their fellow Americans. They might want to take a look at NuCivic Data Enterprise, the recently unveiled cloud-based, open source, open data platform for government from NuCivic, in partnership with Acquia and Carahsoft. It’s providing agencies an OpenSaaS approach to meeting open data mandates to publish and share datasets online, based on the Drupal open source content management system.

NuCivic’s open source DKAN Drupal distribution provides the core data management components for the NuCivic Data platform; it was recognized last week as a grand prize winner for Amazon Web Services’ Global City on a Cloud Innovation Challenge in the Partner in Innovation category. Projects in this category had to demonstrate that the application solves a particular challenge faced by local government entities. As part of the award, the NuCivic team gets $25,000 in AWS services to further support its open data efforts.

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Semantic Web Job: Software Development Engineer

Amazon Web Services logo Amazon Web Services is looking for a Software Development Engineer. The job description states, “Every day customers are moving complex workloads and applications to harness the power, availability, and scalability of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Being very customer focused, AWS wants to provide as friction-less a migration path to AWS as possible, to that end we are looking for software engineers to build a world class experience moving complex workloads and applications to AWS seamlessly with as much automation as possible. This is a tall order to discover, analyze, and automate the movement of complex, multi-layer, dependency rich applications to AWS.

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Load-Control: Semantria Takes On The Social Media Surge Infrastructure Challenge

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Image courtesy: Flickr/Webtreats

Semantria is tackling some of the challenges that come with being a cloud-based social media services provider startup. The company offers a text and sentiment analysis service (which you can read about here) to clients and partners. That includes companies like Sprinklr, which manages the social customer experience for other brands with the help of Semantria’s API for analyzing social signals about those clients.

The good news is that with growing social data volumes, there’s a growing need for semantically-oriented services like Semantria’s that help businesses make sense of that information for themselves or their clients. The downside is that a huge surge in volume of social mentions around a company, its product, or anything else can hit such services hard in the pocketbook when it comes to acquiring the cloud infrastructure to handle the tidal wave.

“Everybody suffers from this kind of thing,” says Semantria founder and CEO Oleg Rogynskyy. “We experience it daily.”

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Cruxly Analytics Technology Drives Actions From Intents

Image courtesy: Flickr/ M4D GROUP

Image courtesy: Flickr/ M4D GROUP

What are your customers – or potential clients – saying or asking online, often in short texts and streaming posts, or in emails about your products, services, or their own particular interests or desires? If you can understand their actionable intents in realtime, then you have a good shot at responding swiftly and appropriately to those expressed intents, requests, or queries. That could add up to new sales, new customers, and better marketing and product management.

Startup Cruxly, which is presenting at this week’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium in NYC, believes it’s taking the oft-touted concept of social media monitoring in a new direction with its platform that applies natural language processing techniques for intent detection in realtime. “The idea is to be actionable,” says CEO Aloke Guha. “If it’s not actionable, at most [monitoring] is a nice-to-have [capability].”

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The Supply Chain Is One Big Graph In Start-up Elementum’s Platform

rsz_elementum_transport_appStartup Elementum wants to take supply chains into the 21st century. Incubated at Flextronics, the second largest contract manufacturer in the world, and launching today with $44 million in Series B funding from that company and Lightspeed Ventures, its approach is to get supply chain participants – the OEMs that generate product ideas and designs, the contract manufacturers who build to those specs, the component makers who supply the ingredients to make the product, the various logistics hubs to move finished product to market, and the retail customer – to drop the one-off relational database integrations and instead see the supply chain fundamentally as a complex graph or web of connections.

“It’s no different thematically from how Facebook thinks of its social network or how LinkedIn thinks of what it calls the economic graph,” says Tyler Ziemann, head of growth at Elementum. Built on Amazon Web Services, Elementum’s “mobile-first” apps for real-time visibility, shipment tracking and carrier management, risk monitoring and mitigation, and order collaboration have a back-end built to consume and make sense of both structured and unstructured data on-the-fly, based on a real-time Java, MongoDB NoSQL document database to scale in a simple and less expensive way across a global supply chain that fundamentally involves many trillions of records, and flexible schema graph database to store and map the nodes and edges of the supply chain graph.

“Relational database systems can’t scale to support the types of data volumes we need and the flexibility that is required for modeling the supply chain as a graph,” Ziemann says.

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Singly “App Fabric” Platform Helps Developers Deeply Connect To Other Apps So Users Can Connect With All Their Data

Singly, which has as its mission connecting people more closely with their data everywhere it lives, now is opening up the beta of its development platform to help developers create the apps that can make that happen.

As co-founder and CEO Jason Cavnar describes Singly’s work, “it is an app fabric product” that gives developers a way to build applications without having to worry about making all the different connection points into the other applications they want their products to talk to. “That’s handled as a service for them. Like Amazon Web Services is for the infrastructure layer, we would like to be a trusted partner in the data layer,” he says.

“It’s really about a person’s life and experiences – sharing that wherever it is in other applications into a new one and that new one generating things to share back out,” says fellow co-founder and CTO Jeremie Miller, who invented Jabber/XMPP technologies and was the primary developer of jabberd 1.0, the first XMPP server. APIs are prominent in Singly’s approach to unlocking that data, but Miller sees some parallels between its own mission and that of the semantic web – a concept whose potential he’s always been excited about, he says, but which he doesn’t think has caught on as he’d hoped.

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CloudSearch — New From Amazon Web Services

Amazon CloudSearch Amazon Web Services have added CloudSearch to their increasingly comprehensive portfolio of everything a developer would ever want.

Amazon CloudSearch is a fully-managed search service in the cloud that allows customers to easily integrate fast and highly scalable search functionality into their applications. With a few clicks in the AWS Management Console, developers simply create a search domain, upload the data they want to make searchable to Amazon CloudSearch, and the service then automatically provisions the technology resources required and deploys a highly tuned search index.

In their press release they say CloudSearch is based on technology that has been rattling around on their network for a while – A9.
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Amazon Announces Amazon CloudSearch

Amazon Web Services is now offering CloudSearch as a paid service. The official AWS announcement states, “Continuing along in our quest to give you the tools that you need to build ridiculously powerful web sites and applications in no time flat at the lowest possible cost, I’d like to introduce you to Amazon CloudSearch. If you have ever searched Amazon.com, you’ve already used the technology that underlies CloudSearch. You can now have a very powerful and scalable search system (indexing and retrieval) up and running in less than an hour.” Read more

Common Crawl To Add New Data In Amazon Web Services Bucket

The Common Crawl Foundation is on the verge of adding to its Amazon Web Services (AWS) Public Data Set of openly and freely accessible web crawl data. It was back in January that Common Crawl announced the debut of its corpus on AWS (see our story here). Now, a billion new web sites are in the bucket, according to Common Crawl director Lisa Green, adding to the 5 billion web pages already there.

“When are you going to have new data is one of most frequent questions we get,” she says. The answer is that processing is underway now, and she hopes they’ll be ready to go this week.

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Common Crawl Founder Gil Elbaz Speaks About New Relationship With Amazon, Semantic Web Projects Using Its Corpus, And Why Open Web Crawls Matter To Developing Big Data Expertise

The Common Crawl Foundation’s repository of openly and freely accessible web crawl data is about to go live as a Public Data Set on Amazon Web Services.  The non-profit Common Crawl is the vision of Gil Elbaz, who founded Applied Semantics and the AdSense technology for which Google acquired it , as well as the Factual open data aggregation platform, and it counts Nova Spivack  — who’s been behind semantic services from Twine to Bottlenose – among its board of directors.

Elbaz’ goal in developing the repository: “You can’t access, let alone download, the Google or the Bing crawl data. So certainly we’re differentiated in being very open and transparent about what we’re crawling and actually making it available to developers,” he says.

“You might ask why is it going to be revolutionary to allow many more engineers and researchers and developers and students access to this data, whereas historically you have to work for one of the big search engines…. The question is, the world has the largest-ever corpus of knowledge out there on the web, and is there more that one can do with it than Google and Microsoft and a handful of other search engines are already doing? And the answer is unquestionably yes. ”

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