Posts Tagged ‘Android’

Senzari’s MusicGraph APIs Look To Enhance Musical Journeys

MusicGraph image

News came the other week that Senzari had announced the MusicGraph knowledge engine for music. The Semantic Web Blog had a chance to learn a little bit more about it what’s underway thanks to a chat with Senzari’s COO Demian Bellumio.

MusicGraph used to go by the geekier name of Adaptable Music Parallel Processing Platform, or AMP3 for short, for helping users control their Internet radio. “We wanted to put more knowledge into our graph. The idea was we have really cool and interesting data that is ontologically connected in ways never done before,” says Bellumio. “We wanted to put it out in the world and let the world leverage it, and MusicGraph is a production of that vision.”

Since its announcement earlier this month about launching the consumer version on the Firefox OS platform that lets users make complex queries about music and learn and then listen to results, Senzari has submitted its technology to be offered for the iOS, Android, and Windows Mobile platforms.  “You can ask anything you can think of in the music realm. We connect about 1 billion different points to respond to these queries,” he says. Its data covers more than twenty million songs, connected to millions of individual albums and artists across all genres, with extracted information on everything from keys to concept extractions derived from lyrics.

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Your Holiday Shopping Guide: AI, NLP, And Smart Glass Gifts Too

The holiday shopping window is starting to close. How far along have you gotten?

To help out, we’ve compiled a list of some gift-giving ideas with a little bit of smarts to them.

rsz_ankiAnki DRIVE: Artificial intelligence comes to the video game world. This one’s getting a lot of buzz – some are even heralding it as the season’s hottest toy. TIME Magazine has put it on its Top 25 innovations list, too. Each car, the company says, thinks for itself. The recipient of your gift can control it with an iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad or iPad Mini to go up against friends or AI-enabled opponents, but the car can drive itself and make its own decisions as it does so, becoming more sophisticated the more you drive and even deciding to take out players. The game comes with a physical track, two intelligent cars and the downloadable Anki DRIVE app. Check out the video here.

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Nara Delivers Neural Networking For All

rsz_naramalayNara is officially on its way from being solely a consumer-lifestyle brand – with its neural networking technology helping users find dining and hotel experiences that match their tastes – to also being the power behind other companies’ recommendation and curation offerings. This summer it made a deal with Singapore Communications’ Singtel Digital Life Division to use its technology to help their users hone in on personalized eating options, and today that online food and dining guide, HungryGoWhereMalysia, goes live.

But Singtel won’t be the only outside party to plug into Nara’s backbone, as the company today also is announcing that it is licensing its capabilities to other parties interested in leveraging them. “An enterprise can plug into our neural network in the cloud through our API,” says CEO Tom Copeman, accessing its smarts for analyzing and then personalizing tons of data from anywhere on the web, tailored to the type of service they’d like to offer.

HungryGoWhereMalaysia, for example, is much like Nara for personalized restaurant discovery here in the states, except culturally branded to their markets; local consumers will get tailored list of dining recommendations from over 35,000 restaurants throughout the country, and as the service gets to know them better, suggestions will be more finely honed to match their Digital DNA profiles. “We believe we’re the first in computer science to receive third-party data from outside sources through our API into our neural network, to make the calculations and comparisons, and send back down a more organized, personalized and targeted selections based on individual preferences.”

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AppCrawlr App Discovery Service Goes More Mobile

rsz_app4AppCrawlr, the semantic mobile app discovery and recommendation service, is adding Windows Phone apps to its iOS and Android app-finder solution. The service, which debuted earlier this year (see our story here), has at its heart the TipSense content discovery and knowledge extraction technology, which also lies behind the company’s DishTip food discovery service.

Microsoft has been trying to pick up some steam in the mobile phone market, acquiring Nokia’s phone business for $7.2 billion in September and this month announcing Update 3 of Windows Phone 8 that supports faster processors and larger screens. Its market share has grown, according to Gartner, to 3.3 percent worldwide, to put it in the #3 smartphone slot. Gartner also noted, though, that Microsoft has work to do to grow interest among app developers.

Microsoft recently calculated more than 100,000 apps in the Windows app store. Though that’s far less than what you can find in the iPhone App Store – which reportedly boasts something along the lines of 1,000,000 – it’s still nice to have some help to find what you really want among tens of thousands of apps. From every app detail page, users can search on a single platform or to find across Windows Phone, iOS, and Android operating systems.

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Google Now Comes To Google Search

The next few days will see Google upping the search ante again, whether you’re looking for information in Gmail, Google Calendar or Google+. In Google Search, users will be able to ask questions like what is their flight status or when an expected package will arrive, without having to troll through their emails or delivery tracking information, according to the company’s blog.

Essentially, Google Now capabilities for Android, iPhones and iPads, is coming to Google Search, for all U.S. English-speaking users on tablets, smartphones and desktops too. Both voice and typed search queries are supported. According to the blog, users will be able to get information on their upcoming flights and live status on current flights; see dining plans or hotel stays by querying for their reservations; see what’s on the charge card and order status by asking about their purchases; view their upcoming schedules by asking about tomorrow’s plans; or explore images – by what’s in them or their relationship to trips or events – that they’ve uploaded to Google Plus.

Google is pulling from its swath of connections “trying to understand you,” says David Amerland, author of the new book, Google Semantic Search.

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New On The Speech Recognition Scene: Droids With NLP Processors And More

There are new Motorola Droid devices in town: The three Verizon Android 4.2 smartphones unveiled at a press event yesterday include the Motorola Droid Mini, Ultra and Maxx. The line includes what the company touts as the longest-lasting 4G LTE smartphone in the Maxx, with the vendor claiming 48 hours on a single charge, and what it says is the thinnest 4G LTE smartphone around in the Ultra. The smartphones reportedly all come with a unique Kevlar fiber 3D unibody design and a few months’ free Google Music All Access subscription, too. But what will catch the eyes of readers of this blog is the proprietary Motorola X8 Mobile Computing System that’s behind the sleek-looking handsets.

In addition to the graphics and application processor cores found within the eight-core System are two new low-power cores, one to power contextual computing and one aimed at natural language processing. Read more

Getting Europe Into The App Economy

In the United States, the app economy, as of late 2012, had created close to 530,000 jobs and served as a significant economic driver for a number of states. A study released by CTIA-The Wireless Association and the Application Developers Alliance, dubbed The Geography of the App Economy, reported more than 2.4 million apps available on more than 11 different operating systems and the stat that by 2016, mobile app revenue would be more than $46 billion.

Europe wants in. No wonder, when you see stats like the one from ABI Research this year that point to the combined app revenue from tablets and smartphones being projected to reach $92 billion by 2018, and to the app economy growing at 44.6 percent on average annually. But the continent needs some data to help it get its spot in the limelight, which is where Eurapp comes in.

The newly launched venture, Eurapp, was birthed by the European Commission, and is being run by the Digital Enterprise Research Institute at NUI Galway in conjunction with tech industry analyst firm GigaOM Research. It’s part of the Startup Europe initiative of the European Commission’s Digital Agenda, which aims to help tech entrepreneurs start, maintain and grow their businesses in Europe.  NUI Galway’s Dr John Breslin, SIOC creator and co-founder of iPad news and social reader app StreamGlider (see our story here) is leading the Eurapp project at DERI.

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Siri Alternative Maluuba Offers Sports Results, TV Schedules

Frederic Lardoinois of Tech Crunch reports, “Maluuba, the Waterloo, Canada-based Siri competitor and TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2012 Battlefield finalist, today announced that it has added two new features to its voice-powered personal assistant app for Android and Windows Phone: sports and TV schedules. With this, Maluuba users in the U.S. and Canada can now ask it for near real-time sports results and query the service for TV listings in their area by name, genre or channel. One aspect of the service the Maluuba team has always been proud of is the fact that it has managed to add additional domains to the service quickly. The service started out with 18 domains, including restaurants, movies and general knowledge queries, but the team has continued to expand the range of topics it can handle since then. It has also rapidly expanded internationally since its launch and launched its Windows Phone 8 app earlier this year, too.” Read more

iOS Gets a Dose of Google Now

Stuart Dredge of The Guardian writes, “Google has launched its Google Now service for iOS devices, as an update to its existing Google Search app. Accessed by swiping upwards from the bottom of the app’s homescreen, Google Now learns about its user through their activities and their history in various Google services. It then serves up weather forecasts, traffic reports, boarding passes, sports scores and other information when they may be relevant. On iOS, it’s the sole new feature in version 3.0.0 of the Google Search app. Available for Android devices since the Android 4.1 Jelly Bean software was released in 2012, Google Now’s iOS incarnation has been subject to speculation this year.” Read more

Now You Can Talk To Your TV — And Get A Response

Seen anything good on TV lately? If the answer is ‘No,’ then maybe the problem is that you and your TV just aren’t communicating as well as you could be. The same may be said of your experience across other viewing mediums, like smartphones, tablets and PCs.

Veveo wants to change the picture, so to speak. “We want the TV to be as friendly as possible so you and the TV can have a really productive relationship,” says CMO Sam Vasisht. The company, which earlier this month exhibited its Conversational Interface Technology at TV Connect 2013 in London, says there’s a need for a universal interface based on natural language capability, so that people more intuitively can grasp what is available from where in a world of fragmented content sources, including how to better search for that content and manage their viewing experiences with greater speed and ease.

“Voice is probably the most natural way for us to deliver this experience,” says Vasisht. Veveo wants to be the platform that enables service providers and OEMs and video programmers to give their audiences the power of speech. Read more

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