Posts Tagged ‘api’

LinguaSys Launches “GlobalNLP” Natural Language Processing API Portal for Developers

linguasysBOCA RATON, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–LinguaSys has created a new Application Programming Interface (API) portal, GlobalNLP™, https://nlp.linguasys.com/ to reach the flourishing global developer population building Natural Language Processing applications with their own business logic. GlobalNLP™ enables software developers to understand and extract meaning from unstructured or conversational text across languages.

LinguaSys provides deep understanding of the meaning of textual human dialogue better than anyone. We offer broad language support in over 20 languages, including the more challenging Asian and Middle Eastern languages, the most high quality semantic collection in the industry. Read more

Wit.ai Offers Siri-Like Natural Language Processing in an API

witaiKia Kokalitcheva of VentureBeat reports, “A few years ago, when Apple added Siri to the iPhone, talking to inanimate objects with batteries to make them do stuff was pretty novel. Today, thanks to companies like Wit.ai, even kids at hackathons are showing off weekend projects that are voice-controlled. Wit.ai, a Y Combinator-backed startup that provides natural language processing (NLP) in the form of an API, is helping developers and startups integrate voice commands into their products. The company is announcing today that it has raised $3 million in seed funding just over a year since its founders posted the first API version on Hacker News.” Read more

FirstRain Launches New API for Predictive Analytics in Enterprise Apps

First-RainJanet Wagner of Programmable Web reports, “FirstRain, a personal business analytics platform provider, has announced the launch of a FirstRain API that allows enterprise developers to incorporate FirstRain platform functionality into third-party applications and systems. The new FirstRain API provides programmatic access to real-time data from the proprietary FirstRain business graph, which the company says ‘extracts the deep, interconnected relationships between companies, businesses and markets’.” Read more

Forging Ahead in the New AI Economy

"Forge Ahead" photo of arrow on pavementWe are seeing the beginning of the new artificial intelligence economy. This has many parallels to the infrastructure-as-a-service wave led by Amazon Web Services (AWS), which provided the world with access to highly-scalable compute capacity. AI technologies are being exposed as core infrastructure via the cloud, enabling companies to build smarter applications and services.

If you think you aren’t already a part of the AI economy, think again. Most of us are already participating through our interaction with popular applications and services. For example, Google Maps uses AI technology to better understand Street View images to give more accurate directions; and both Siri and Google Now use a combination of speech recognition, language understanding, and predictive modeling to act as digital personal assistants.

So the big question is: why now? Historically, AI technologies have been limited by a lack of data, insufficient compute capability, and poor algorithms. We’re now witnessing the convergence of three major forces: ready access to massive data, highly scalable on-demand compute capability, and a number of core algorithmic breakthroughs that enable us to better train robust AI systems. This is a perfect storm that has resulted in significant advances in computers’ ability to understand text, images, video, and speech. Read more

Word To Developers: Power Your Apps With Data And Insights

aplogoApigee wants the development community to be able to seamlessly take advantage of predictive analytics in their applications.

“One of the biggest things we want to ensure is that the development community gets comfortable with powering their apps with data and insights,” says Anant Jhingran, Apigee’s VP of products and formerly CTO for IBM’s information management and data division. “That is the next wave that we see.”

Apigee wants to help them ride that wave, enabling their business to better deal with customer issues, from engagement to churn, in more personal and contextual ways. “We are in the business of helping customers take their digital assets and expose them through clean APIs so that these APIs can power the next generation of applications,” says Jhingran. But in thinking through that core business, “we realized the interactions happening through the APIs represent very powerful signals. Those signals, when combined with other contextual data that may be in the enterprise, enable some very deep insights into what is really happening in these channels.”

With today’s announcement of a new version of its Apigee Insights big data platform, all those signals generated – through API and web channels, call centers, and more – can come together in the service of predictive analytics for developers to leverage.

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AlchemyAPI Launches Deep Learning API-Based Service, AlchemyVision

Alchemy API

Derrick Harris of GigaOM reports, “Denver-based startup AlchemyAPI is keeping proactive in the world of artificial intelligence, launching on Monday night a new service that lets users perform computer vision tasks such as image-tagging and photo search via API. The product, called AlchemyVision, is the company’s first foray outside the natural-language processing space where it has focused since 2011. It also probably foreshadows a spate of computer vision services yet to come. AlchemyAPI first demonstrated its object recognition service in September but Turner said the company has done a lot of work in the meantime to get it ready for commercial use. Among the big differences is the sheer scale of the new system, which is running unsupervised across millions of online images and using context from the pages they’re housed on in order to determine what they are.” Read more

Aylien Takes Text Analytics API To New Audience

aylien imageYou may have heard about Aylien awhile back, when it was trying to carve a niche as a consumer products company that used its text analysis API to inform its delivery of articles via a news reader interface to the masses. It’s changed tactics since then: Now the company — which recently brought semantic web expert and lecturer at NUI Galway and Insight Centre Dr. John Breslin on-board as an advisor — is orienting its text analysis and news APIs to media and PR organizations, as well as other industries and developers.

“It makes a lot of sense for customers,” says CEO and founder Parsa Ghaffari. “The biggest volume of information on the Internet is represented as text, which is obviously unstructured information. Through NLP you can obviously try to find structure in text, …so we think it can be seen as a first step to the semantic web vision to enable any developer or startup to extract that structure and find the value in it.”

Aylien’s text analytics API consists of eight distinct natural language processing, information retrieval, and machine learning APIs for article extraction, article summarization, classification, entity extraction, concept extraction, language detection, sentiment analysis and hashtag suggestions.

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New Seevl API Lets Developers Add Music and Artist Data to Apps

seevl

Steve O’Hear of TechCrunch reports, “Dublin-based Seevl has released an API for developers to let them easily add music recommendations and artist data to their apps. The new offering gives app makers access to some of the underlying technology that currently powers the Seevl consumer-facing app, which is a cross-service music discovery offering that gives music recommendations and lets you build ‘mix tapes’, amongst a plethora of music-related features. The Seevl API is powered by the startup’s own music meta-data graph, which itself is built on top of Freebase, Wikipedia and MusicBrainz, and uses Seevl’s in-house semantic technologies and recommendation and search algorithms — both founders, Alexandre Passant and Julie Letierce, previously worked at the renowned Semantic Web R&D lab DERI.” Read more

Senzari’s MusicGraph APIs Look To Enhance Musical Journeys

MusicGraph image

News came the other week that Senzari had announced the MusicGraph knowledge engine for music. The Semantic Web Blog had a chance to learn a little bit more about it what’s underway thanks to a chat with Senzari’s COO Demian Bellumio.

MusicGraph used to go by the geekier name of Adaptable Music Parallel Processing Platform, or AMP3 for short, for helping users control their Internet radio. “We wanted to put more knowledge into our graph. The idea was we have really cool and interesting data that is ontologically connected in ways never done before,” says Bellumio. “We wanted to put it out in the world and let the world leverage it, and MusicGraph is a production of that vision.”

Since its announcement earlier this month about launching the consumer version on the Firefox OS platform that lets users make complex queries about music and learn and then listen to results, Senzari has submitted its technology to be offered for the iOS, Android, and Windows Mobile platforms.  “You can ask anything you can think of in the music realm. We connect about 1 billion different points to respond to these queries,” he says. Its data covers more than twenty million songs, connected to millions of individual albums and artists across all genres, with extracted information on everything from keys to concept extractions derived from lyrics.

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Import.io Turns Any Website Into an API for Free

importio

Max Smolaks of Tech Week Europe reports, “Andrew Fogg, co-founder of the UK start-up Import.io, thinks every web resource should have an Application Programming Interface (API). In order to make online data more accessible, his company turns any website into a spreadsheet or an API, for free. Fogg claims that in the past few months, the users of this service have created more Web APIs than the rest of the Internet combined. Jerome Bouteiller has interviewed the entrepreneur at LeWeb 2013 conference in Paris, where the two discussed the future of the company and the idea of the Semantic Web, proposed by the ‘father of the Internet’ Sir Tim Berners-Lee.” Read more

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