Posts Tagged ‘Apple’

Semantic Technology Jobs: Apple

Apple

Apple is looking for a Software Engineer, Natural Language Processing in Santa Clara, CA. The post states, “The Natural Languages Group is looking for an engineer to develop and apply algorithms and data in these areas. This involves application of bleeding edge machine learning and statistical pattern recognition on large text corpora. The position will involve all aspects of the use of natural-language processing in software, including functionality, algorithms, correctness, user experience, and performance, on both iOS and OS X.”

 

Qualifications for the position include: “Knowledge of natural-language processing techniques. MSc or PhD in Computer Science. Read more

Apple Might Use Your Heart Rate and Expression to Market to You

490830281_a6da6da3fc_o

Aaron Taube of Business Insider recently wrote in the SF Gate, “Apple is thinking about how it can figure out exactly how you feel at any given moment in order to show you the most relevant advertisements. In a patent application the company filed Thursday, Apple describes a hypothetical system that would analyze and define people’s moods based on a variety of clues including facial expressions, perspiration rates, and vocal patterns. To be clear, Apple patents just about everything it does, with most applications never amounting to anything with regard to the actual products Apple releases. Still it’s interesting to see how Apple is thinking about predictive, contextual advertising at such a granular level, especially in light of its battle with companies like Google and Facebook to offer search products (Siri, the App Store) that know precisely what a user is looking for — even if the user has not expressly communicated his or her desire.” Read more

Semantic Technology Jobs: Apple

Apple

Apple is looking for a Siri Language Engineer fluent in Cantonese in Santa Clara, CA. According to the post, “You will be responsible for the international engineering of Siri, and be required to interact with several world class teams of experts at Apple. From speech recognition to natural language processing, machine learning, big data consumption all the way to speech synthesis, you will be involved and challenged to bring innovative solutions to complex engineering issues, with an international flavor. Knowing your local market is key. We are looking for a demonstrated ability to be creative, take ownership of a project, superior technical expertise, and a knack for solving problems that stump most engineers. Having worked on shipping products and being familiar with the rush to the finish line is highly desired.” Read more

Hello 2014 (Part 2)

rsz_lookahead2

Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

Read more

Hello 2014

rsz_lookaheadone

Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

Read more

Good-Bye 2013

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

As we prepare to greet the New Year, we take a look back at the year that was. Some of the leading voices in the semantic web/Linked Data/Web 3.0 and sentiment analytics space give us their thoughts on the highlights of 2013.

Read on:

 

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

The completion and rapid adoption of the updated SPARQL specs, the use of Linked Data (LD) in life sciences, the adoption of LD by the European Commission, and governments in the UK, The Netherlands (NL) and more [stand out]. In other words, [we are seeing] the maturation and growing acknowledgement of the advantages of the technologies.

I contributed to a recent study into the use of Linked Data within governments. We spoke to various UK government departments as well as the UN FAO, the German National Library and more. The roadblocks and enablers section of the study (see here) is useful IMO.

Bottom line: Those organisations use LD because it suits them. It makes their own tasks easier, it allows them to fulfill their public tasks more effectively. They don’t do it to be cool, and they don’t do it to provide 5-Star Linked Data to others. They do it for hard headed and self-interested reasons.

Christine Connors, founder and information strategist, TriviumRLG:

What sticks out in my mind is the resource market: We’ve seen more “semantic technology” job postings, academic positions and M&A activity than I can remember in a long time. I think that this is a noteworthy trend if my assessment is accurate.

There’s also been a huge increase in the attentions of the librarian community, thanks to long-time work at the Library of Congress, from leading experts in that field and via schema.org.

Read more

Is Apple Entering the Semantic Search Battle?

to

Jim Edwards of Business Insider recently speculated on Apple’s acquisition of Topsy Labs earlier this week. Edwards writes, “Why would the maker of iPads and iPhones need a small company that culls data from Twitter? The likely answer is that Apple needs help with something that is as old as the Internet itself: search. For most people, ‘search’ stopped being sexy more than 10 years ago, when Google proved that its search engine was pretty much the only one you needed. But Apple just dropped $US200 million on Topsy, likely in hopes of using Topsy’s data to improve recommendations when people search for apps and stuff in iTunes and the App Store.” Read more

Semantic Technology Job: Apple

Apple

Apple is looking for a Siri Software Engineer – Data in Santa Clara, CA. The post states, “Play a part in the next revolution in human-computer interaction. Contribute to a product that is redefining mobile computing. Create groundbreaking technology for large scale systems, spoken language, big data, and artificial intelligence.  And work with the people who created the intelligent assistant that helps millions of people get things done — just by asking. Join the Siri Data team at Apple… The Siri data team is responsible for the analytics of Siri usage, the preparation and serving of data that Siri uses to answer questions, and the sophisticated algorithms that use the data to improve Siri’s accuracy.” Read more

Real-Time Ad Targeting Platform Spectrum Goes Self-Service

12foldSpectrum, Twelvefold Media’s managed service designed to target ad messages in real-time based on understanding consumers’ intent around the content they’re consuming, now is offering a self-service version of the platform. (See The Semantic Web Blog’s earlier coverage of the platform here.) With Spectrum 3.0, trading desks, clients and marketing cloud companies can use Spectrum’s listening and indexing capabilities — algorithms for determining why someone is reading a piece of content at that moment in time and for scoring millions of URLs daily — with their own bidding rules. It will continue to offer Spectrum as a managed service for always-on and spot campaigns, as well.

The wizard that used to be behind the process of understanding the mindset of the content to target – based on a series of data inputs stemming from Spectrum’s advanced understanding of natural language on the page, from which targeting schema are created – now operates in the background, so users aren’t required to enter in keywords or phrases to go up against.  For instance, a smartphone vendor, leveraging an article on Apple slashing iPhone 5c orders, can add that URL to the system to go up against Spectrum’s big index of the visible web to find relevant pages like that one, says Mike Campbell, VP, product at Twelvefold.

Read more

PolyVista Technology Digs Deep Into Sentiment

rsz_polyvSamsung Galaxy S4 or Apple iPhone 5? Many users are contemplating which smartphone upgrade is the right one for them. PolyVista, a BI text analytics tool that specializes in finding insights and sentiment in text-based data like online reviews, social media, blogs and surveys, wants to help out. It just published the results it gleaned from its PolyVista Zoom review analysis technology, which looked at online review text and analyzed each topic for positive and negative sentiment.

While both garnered more positive than negative commentary on social media, it concludes that the Galaxy S4 got a slight — 8 percent — edge over the iPhone 5.

That’s something both Apple and Samsung would like to know, too. And providing insights like that “from either structured or unstructured data to a business-person with a minimal amount of work by them” is what the company is aiming for, says Shahbaz Anwar, PolyVista CEO. Its value proposition, he says, is bringing text analytics via the cloud to companies that can’t afford to make the investments in expertise, talent software and infrastructure to do it in-house, particularly in verticals such as high-tech and services.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>