Posts Tagged ‘artificial intelligence’

How SwiftKey is Using NLP and AI to Revolutionize the Keyboard

swiftSteve Ranger of Tech Republic reports, “Qwerty [the standard keyboard layout] was a compromise from the start. And as such you’d expect it to be swept away as the technology changed. And yet this odd layout became the standard, used since on billions of devices from typewriters to tablets and PCs. Even as the cold steel of the typewriter was replaced by the cool glass of a touchscreen smartphone, Qwerty has continued to dominate. That is, until now. A number of companies are rethinking the keyboard for the digital age, led by a small UK startup called SwiftKey, so that a mere 150 years after it was first created, the keyboard could finally be made to behave just how the user wants it to.” Read more

Move Over Siri: Make Way for Viv

vivKatherine Noyes of Tech News World reports, “The inventors of Apple’s Siri personal assistant have launched an independent effort that could make their first offspring look kind of dumb. Billed by its creators as ‘the global brain,’ Viv aims to radically simplify the world by providing an intelligent interface to everything. ‘They are trying to abstract Siri’s [natural-language processing] interface so you could apply it into other applications and domains,’ Raj Singh, CEO and founder of Tempo AI, told TechNewsWorld. ‘For example, what if I wanted to integrate a Siri-like interface into the Yelp app or the Expedia app?’ Currently, ‘there isn’t a good facility to do this,’ he said. Read more

A Deeper Look at Common Sense Reasoning

Siri LogoCatherine Havasi, CEO of Luminoso recently wrote for Tech Crunch, “Everyone knows that ‘water is wet,’ and ‘people want to be happy,’ and we assume everyone we meet shares this knowledge. It forms the basis of how we interact and allows us to communicate quickly, efficiently, and with deep meaning. As advanced as technology is today, its main shortcoming as it becomes a large part of daily life in society is that it does not share these assumptions. We find ourselves talking more and more to our devices — to our mobile phones and even our televisions. But when we talk to Siri, we often find that the rules that underlie her can’t comprehend exactly what we want if we stray far from simple commands. For this vision to be fulfilled, we’ll need computers to understand us as we talk to each other in a natural environment. For that, we’ll need to continue to develop the field of common-sense reasoning — without it, we’re never going to be able to have an intelligent conversation with Siri, Google Glass or our Xbox.” Read more

Whose Job Is It Anyway?

Photo courtesy:  Flickr/photologue_np

Photo courtesy: Flickr/photologue_np

Will a robot take your job in the future? Given their increasing sophistication, it’s not surprising if the topic is of growing concerns to more people. The Semantic Web Blog has reported, for example, on robots that are learning to do tasks in response to humans’ natural language, and a talking robot on a space journey, covering the gamut from personal assistant to astronaut.

The Pew Research Center released a report last week entitled AI, Robotics and the Future of Jobs. It raises the question of whether advances in robotics and artificial intelligence will displace more jobs than they create by 2025, but the experts the report draws upon for their opinions haven’t reached a consensus on that point yet. Forty-eight percent believe both blue- and white-collar worker jobs are at risk, and that the future will see greater income inequality, more permanent unemployment and greater social disruption as a result. The other 52 percent see a lot of jobs that currently require real people will be taken over by robots or digital agents, as well – but with the happier prospect that humans will figure out new jobs and industries to replace the livings they can no longer make with their own brains or hands.

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Cognitive Computing And Semantic Technology: When Worlds Connect

ccimageIn mid-July Dataversity.net, the sister site of The Semantic Web Blog, hosted a webinar on Understanding The World of Cognitive Computing. Semantic technology naturally came up during the session, which was moderated by Steve Ardire, an advisor to cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning startups. You can find a recording of the event here.

Here, you can find a more detailed discussion of the session at large, but below are some excerpts related to how the worlds of cognitive computing and semantic technology interact.

One of the panelists, IBM Big Data Evangelist James Kobielus, discussed his thinking around what’s missing from general discussions of cognitive computing to make it a reality. “How do we normally perceive branches of AI, and clearly the semantic web and semantic analysis related to natural language processing and so much more has been part of the discussion for a long time,” he said. When it comes to finding the sense in multi-structured – including unstructured – content that might be text, audio, images or video, “what’s absolutely essential is that as you extract the patterns you are able to tag the patterns, the data, the streams, really deepen the metadata that gets associated with that content and share that metadata downstream to all consuming applications so that they can fully interpret all that content, those objects…[in] whatever the relevant context is.”

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Is Baidu Coming for Google?

baidu-logoAviva Rutkin of New Scientist recently wrote, “Rumours have been circulating that the Chinese search engine is developing a bike that could drive itself through packed city streets. The project isn’t ready to be launched yet but Baidu confirmed it is exploring the idea.The news is intriguing, and not just because self-navigating bikes would be cool. Research into autonomous vehicles is yet another way that Baidu is following Google’s model of pushing at the boundaries of artificial intelligence.” Read more

Digital Reasoning Takes On Early Risk Detection For Compliance- And Security-Sensitive Sectors

synthimageDigital Reasoning’s Synthesys machine learning platform (which The Semantic Web Blog initially covered here) this summer should see its Version 3.9 release. The update will build on the 3.8 release, which delivered with its Glance user interface the discovery and investigative capabilities that help information analysts in finance, intelligence and other compliance- and security-sensitive sectors react to findings in user profiles of interest and their associated relationships, activities and risks. Version 3.9 takes on the proactive part of the equation — early risk detection — via its Scout user interface.

Last year, the company honed in on compliance use cases ranging from insider trading to money laundering with Version 3.7 of Synthesys (covered here). There, the technology for discovering the meaning in unstructured data at scale, highlighting important entities in context, was applied to email communications for organizations such as financial institutions that have to be on the lookout for conversations that cross compliance boundaries.

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Ron Kaplan of Nuance Communications on the Future of Artificial Intelligence

ronPeter Rothman of h+ Magazine writes, “I recently got together with Ron Kaplan who is a well known artificial intelligence researcher in the area of natural language processing. Ron is a Distinguished Scientist at Nuance Communications. The conversation is about 1 hour long and the main theme was the recent comments about dangers from artificial intelligence made by Professor Stephen Hawking and also Elon Musk, Eugene Goostman the chatbot that supposedly passed the Turing Test.  Beyond this, the conversation ranges near and far covering and whether it is ridiculous to suggest that Siri is a conscious being, reflective computing, NL interfaces and access to knowledge, communicating with wives, the effects of my diet, and the future of human languages when universal translation becomes widely available.” Read more

Artificial Intelligence: What We Hoped For & What We’ve Gotten

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Michael C. Daconta of GCN recently wrote, “Over the last year, several developments on the artificial intelligence (AI) front have occurred that reflect our wildest fantasies and worst fears for this technology.  Here are a few examples: A battle continues to rage between MIT linguist Noam Chomsky and Google Director of Research Peter Norvig over the increased use of statistics and probability in AI.  Chomsky argued that the ‘new AI’ is merely mimicking behavior instead of unraveling the rules and processes of cognition.  On the other hand, Norvig takes a more practical, probabilistic approach, believing in AI’s suitability for natural language processing, for instance. Last month, CNBC reported that inventor Elon Musk and physicist Stephen Hawking expressed concerns about the future of AI, suggesting that there are dangers in the fledging AI market.  They made it easy to surmise they fear a Robopocalypse caused by AI run amok!” Read more

Artificial Intelligence Pushes Ahead in China

Baidu logoA recent press release revealed that, “There are signs indicating that Chinese Internet users might be the very first group of people to truly reap the benefits of artificial intelligence. The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, written by Ray Kurzweil, painted us a picture of artificial intelligence. Kurzweil describes his law of accelerating returns which predicts an exponential increase in technologies; in the book he says this will lead to a technological singularity in the year 2045, a point where progress is so rapid it outstrips humans’ ability to comprehend it. Baidu, the leading Chinese search service provider, recently announced their ground-breaking Light App (a modified kind of web app), the Baidu Exam-Info Master. Using the artificial intelligence of their search engine, Baidu seeks to offer some practical help to high school seniors when it comes to applying for their dream college after the National College Entrance Examination. This service has soon become wildly popular among users, and may grow into a key motivation for Baidu to duplicate this kind of method into a far broader area.”

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