Posts Tagged ‘bing’

Microsoft Talks Up What It’s Calling The First Truly Virtual Personal Assistant

Microsoft cortanaAs The Semantic Web Blog discussed yesterday here, the Virtual Personal Assistant is getting more personal. Microsoft officially unveiled Cortana as part of the Windows Phone 8.1 smartphone software at its Build event yesterday, and the service effectively replaces the search function on Windows smartphones, both for the Internet and locally.

This statement served as the theme from corporate vice president and manager Joe Belfiore: “Cortana is the first truly personal digital assistant who learns about me and about the things that matter to me most and the people that matter to me most, that understands the Internet and is great at helping me get things done.”

The Bing-powered Cortana is launching in beta mode, and was still subject to a few hiccups during the presentation. For example, when Belfiore asked Cortana to give him the weather in Las Vegas, it reported the information in degrees, and was able to respond to his request to provide the same information in Celsius. But he couldn’t get her to make the calculations to Kelvin. But, he promised attendees, “Try it yourself because she is smart enough to tell you the answer in Kelvin.”

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New Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella Prepared To Lead Microsoft To What May Be A More Semantic Future

01_thMicrosoft – as you’ve no doubt heard by now – has a new CEO. Satya Nadella most recently was Microsoft’s executive VP, cloud and enterprise group. But before that, the man who succeeds Steve Ballmer, he was senior vp, R&D, of online services and before that, the senior vp of search, portal and advertising group. Nadella has been at the company since 1992.

The man who succeeds Steve Ballmer has been referred to as the King of Bing, rebranding the search service from Live Search to Bing and getting kudos for making technical fixes. Announcing his promotion to president of Microsoft’s Server and Tools Business in 2011, Ballmer wrote in a memo that Nadella “led the overall R&D efforts for some of the largest online services and drove the technical vision and strategy for several important milestones, including the critical launch of Bing, new releases of MSN, Yahoo! integration across Bing and adCenter, and much more.”

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Open The Door To Bringing Linked Data To Real-World Projects

ld1Linked Data: Structured Data on the Web is now available in a soft-cover edition. The book, authored by David Wood, Marsha Zaidman, Luke Ruth, and Michael Hausenblas, and with a forward by Tim Berners-Lee, aims to give mainstream developers without previous experience with Linked Data practical techniques for integrating it into real-world projects, focusing on languages with which they’re likely to be familiar, such as JavaScript and Python.

Berners-Lee’s forward gets the ball rolling in a big way, making the case for Linked Data and its critical importance in the web ecosystem:“The Web of hypertext-linked documents is complemented by the very powerful Linked Web of Data.  Why linked?  Well, think of how the value of a Web page is very much a function of what it links to, as well as the inherent value of the information within the Web page. So it is — in a way even more so — also in the Semantic Web of Linked Data.  The data itself is valuable, but the links to other data make it much more so.”

The topic has clearly struck a nerve, Wood believes, noting that today we are “at a point where structured data on the web is getting tremendous play,” from Google’s Knowledge Graph to the Facebook Open Graph protocol, to the growing use of the schema.org vocabulary, to data still growing exponentially in the Linked Open Data Project, and more. “The industry is ready to talk about data and data processing in a way it never has been before,” he continues. There’s growing realization that Linked Data fits in with and nicely complements technologies in the data science realm, such as machine learning algorithms and Hadoop, such that “you can suddenly build things you never could before with a tiny team, and that’s pretty cool….No technology is sufficient in and of itself but combine them and you can do really powerful things.”

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Semantic Technology Jobs: Bing

Bing

Bing is looking for a Senior Software Development Engineer in Bellevue, WA. The post states, “The Bing Local Search Relevance Platform team is responsible for building the world best relevance platform to serve the user’s search intent regarding location, business, address on web, mobile and map entry points and ensure the market expansion for Bing local search faster and cheaper crossing the world.  Location and local query understanding is an important part of local search platform and we are looking for the talent who is interested in solving hard relevance problem in the scalable way: mining against large volume of data from web and internal logs; building scalable solution to construct the machine learned query intent classifiers and query parsers and other ranking features based on query and query context; handling the requests from markets about localization experience and design the platform feature to support the search relevance improvements for different cultures.” Read more

Bing Turns to Deep Learning to Improve Image Search

honey

Zach Walton of Web Pro News recently wrote, “Image search is a cornerstone of any search engine. That’s why both Google and Bing are doing everything they can to improve image search to bring up the most relevant images for any search imaginable. While some may argue that recent changes made to Google image search make it worse, Bing is moving ahead with a new strategy that involves deep learning. So, what is deep learning? In short, it’s a type of machine learning that uses artificial neural networks to learn about and understand multiple concepts, including the abstract. In the past, computer systems had to be manually ‘trained’ to recognize patterns or specific images. With machine learning, these systems can now learn to recognize these patterns on their own. When it comes to image search quality, Bing found that integrating deep learning into its systems greatly increased the quality.” Read more

Where Schema.org Is At: A Chat With Google’s R.V. Guha

 

rvg Interested in how schema.org has trended in the last couple of years since its birth? If you were at The International Semantic Web Conference event in Sydney a couple of weeks back, you may have caught Google Fellow Ramanathan V. Guha — the mind behind schema.org — present a keynote address about the initiative.

Of course, Australia’s a far way to go for a lot of people, so The Semantic Web Blog is happy to catch everyone up on Guha’s thoughts on the topic.

We caught up with him when he was back stateside:

The Semantic Web Blog: Tell us a little bit about the main focus of your keynote.

Guha: The basic discussion was a progress report on schema.org – its history and why it came about a couple of years ago. Other than a couple of panels at SemTech we’ve maintained a rather low profile and figured it might be a good time to talk more about it, and to a crowd that is different from the SemTech crowd.

The short version is that the goal, of course, is to make it easier for mainstream webmasters to add structured data markup to web pages, so that they wouldn’t have to track down many different vocabularies, or think about what Yahoo or Microsoft or Google understands. Before webmasters had to champion internally which vocabularies to use and how to mark up a site, but we have reduced that and also now it’s not an issue of which search engine to cater to.

It’s now a little over two years since launch and we are seeing adoption way beyond what we expected. The aggregate search engines see about 15 percent of the pages we crawl have schema.org markup. This is the first time we see markup approximately on the order of the scale of the web….Now over 5 million sites are using it.  That’s helped by the mainstream platforms like Drupal and WordPress adopting it so that it becomes part of the regular workflow. Read more

The Future of SEO: Panelists At SemTechBiz Weigh In

SEO is dead. Long Live SEO. A panel discussion.Where is SEO going? A panel hosted by Aaron Bradley, Internet marketing manager at InfoMine, Inc. at this week’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in NYC took on the issue at full force. The session, featuring Bing senior product manager Duane Forrester,  semantic web strategist and independent consultant Barbara H. Starr, Swellpath SEO Team Manager Mike Arnesen, and author and analyst David Amerland (see our Q&A with him here), provided some insight into why it’s an exciting time to be working in both semantic technology and search – and why that’s also a scary proposition for some in the SEO set who’ve lived by keywords and links.

On the exciting side of things, Arnesen pointed out that it was always a somewhat unnatural process to have to advise clients to craft content so that it can match to specific keywords to get traction. “Now we can tell them to just write good content, put what you need to put on the web and it will be easier find because of semantic markup and semantic search,” he said.

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UPDATE: The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.

[UPDATE: This panel has a new panelist! Mike Arnesen, SEO Team Manager of SwellPath will participate in New York.]

seo-is-dead-long-live-seoOn October 3 at the New York Semantic Technology & Business Conference (#SemTechBiz), a panel of experts will tackle the issue of how Semantic Web technologies are rapidly changing the landscape of Search Engine Optimization. The panel, titled “The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.,” is made up of Aaron Bradley, David Amerland, Barbara Starr, Duane Forrester, and Mike Arnesen.

The session will address numerous issues at the intersection of Semantic Web and SEO. As the description reads, “From rich snippets to the Google Knowledge Graph to Bing Snapshots semantic technology has transformed the look, feel and functionality of search engines.”

Have these changes undermined the ways in which websites are optimized for search, effectively “killing” SEO? Or are tried-and-true SEO tactics still effective? And what does the future hold for SEO in a semantic world?

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Semantic Technology Jobs: Bing

Bing is looking for a Senior Software Development Engineer in Bellevue, WA. According to the post, “Have you ever issued a query to a search engine, and the information you got back was inappropriate or, worse yet, offensive? Or maybe you set the safesearch mode to ‘strict’, expecting the search engine to filter out explicit adult material, but were surprised with adult content making its way into the results page anyway? Here at Bing Adult Filtering team we are committed to providing a ‘safe’ search experience to Bing’s users. Our mission is to protect our users by identifying and filtering out content that is a) inappropriate for a particular age group, b) offensive and unwanted given user intent or c) illegal in a particular market. It is up to this team to ensure that, for example, a kid querying for ‘babe’ or high-schooler querying for ‘sex education’ do not get inundated with links to inappropriate material and we take tremendous pride in knowing that *we* prevent such poor experience that’s harmful both to the user as well as the Bing brand.” Read more

Nuance’s Voice Is Heard: Its Tech Featured In Samsung Galaxy Gear SmartWatch And Surfi AI Answer Engine

Nuance Communications is high-profile this week. The company has announced that Samsung’s new Galaxy Gear wearable smart watch and Galaxy Note 3 tablet will integrate its voice and language capabilities. Additionally, word comes from SpeechTrans that its new natural language processing application for Windows 8 and Windows RT, which – like Apple’s Siri – leverages Nuance’s speech recognition smarts, has been released.

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