Posts Tagged ‘Bottlenose’

Bottlenose Nerve Center Debuts, Bringing The Artificial Analyst To The Enterprise

rsz_botnosenewThe enterprise version of Bottlenose has formally launched. Now dubbed Nerve Center, the service to provide real-time trend intelligence for brands and businesses, which The Semantic Web Blog previewed here, includes a dashboard featuring live visualization of all trending topics, hashtags and people, top positive and negative influences and sentiment trends, trending images, videos, links and popular messages, the ability to view trending messages by types (complaints vs. endorsements, for example) and real-time KPIs. As with its original service, Nerve Center leverages the company’s Sonar technology to automatically detect new topics and trends that matter to the enterprise.

“Broadly speaking, every large enterprise has to be doing social listening and social analytics,” CEO Nova Spivack told The Semantic Web Blog in an earlier interview, “including in realtime, which is one thing we specialize in. I don’t think any other product out there shows change as it happens as we do.” It’s important, he said, to understand that Bottlenose focuses on the discovery of trends, not just finding what users explicitly search for or track. Part of the release, he added, “will be some pretty powerful alerting to tell you when there is something to look at.”

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Bottlenose Enterprise Wants To Be Your Artificial Analyst Team To Discover Trends And Insights

Bottlenose earlier this month raised $3.6 million in Series A funding to help with its launch of Bottlenose Enterprise, the upcoming tool aimed at helping large companies discover and visualize trends from among a host of data sources, measuring and comparing them for those with the most “trendfluence.” Users will get a realtime dynamic view of change as it happens and a host of analytics for automating insights, the company says.

The Enterprise edition will be a big departure from the current Bottlenose Lite version for individual professionals. That difference starts with the amount of data it can handle. “The free, Lite version looks only at public API data like Twitter’s. The enterprise version uses the firehose,” says CEO Nova Spivack. Another big difference is that the enterprise version adds a lot more views and analytics, in comparison to the personal-use edition, where its Sonar technology provides the chief service of real-time detection of talk around topics personalized to users’ interests so they can visualize and track those topics over time.

Spivack calls what Enterprise does “enterprise-scale trend detection in the cloud,” leveraging a massive Hadoop infrastructure and technologies including Cassandra, MongoDB, and the Storm distributed realtime computation system to process data for deep dives. The cloud handles the computation, and results are shared at the edge, where certain kinds of analytics and visualizations occur locally in the browser for a realtime expience with no latency. With sources such as social streams, stock information, even a company’s proprietary data, and more, the Enterprise version helps brands discover important trends like keywords to bid on or viral content to share, who are their influencers and detractors, what sentiment and demographic movements are taking shape, and to create correlations across data points, too.

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Bottlenose Raises $3.6M to Organize Social Media Streams

Stephanie Yang of Tech Crunch reports, “Bottlenose, a web platform to organize social media streams, has raised $3.6 million in Series A funding. The round was led by ff Venture Capital and joined by Lerer Ventures, Transmedia, Advancit, Stage One Capital, Social Starts, The Social Internet Fund and several angel investors. Including a seed round in 2012, this brings Bottlenose’s total to $4.6 million. The last time we talked to them in 2012, Bottlenose was about to launch its public beta and had about 50,000 users. Bottlenose beta allows you to sync multiple accounts so all news streams are aggregated in one place. The free version is available online, and uses its sonar tool to make connections between tweets, mentions, hashtags, images and other media. CEO Nova Spivack says all new funding will go to scaling its engineering, sales and marketing operations in preparation to publicly launch its new product, Bottlenose Enterprise.” Read more

Semantic Tech Outlook: 2013

Photo Courtesy: Flickr/Lars Plougmann

In recent blogs we’ve discussed where semantic technologies have gone in 2012, and a bit about where they will go this year (see here, here and here).

Here are some final thoughts from our panel of semantic web experts on what to expect to see as the New Year rings in:

John Breslin,lecturer at NUI Galway, researcher and unit leader at DERI, creator of SIOC, and co-founder of Technology Voice and StreamGlider

Broader deployment of the schema.org terms is likely. In the study by Muehlisen and Bizer in July this year, we saw Open Graph Protocol, DC, FOAF, RSS, SIOC and Creative Commons still topping the ranks of top semantic vocabularies being used. In 2013 and beyond, I expect to see schema.org jump to the top of that list.

Christine Connors, Chief Ontologist, Knowledgent:

I think we will see an uptick in the job market for semantic technologists in the enterprise; primarily in the Fortune 2000. I expect to see some M&A activity as well from systems providers and integrators who recognize the desire to have a semantic component in their product suite. (No, I have no direct knowledge; it is my hunch!)

We will see increased competition from data analytics vendors who try to add RDF, OWL or graphstores to their existing platforms. I anticipate saying, at the end of 2013, that many of these immature deployments will leave some project teams disappointed. The mature vendors will need to put resources into sales and business development, with the right partners for consulting and systems integration, to be ready to respond to calls for proposals and assistance.

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Good-Bye to 2012: Continuing Our Look Back At The Year In Semantic Tech

Courtesy: Flickr/LadyDragonflyCC <3

Yesterday we began our look back at the year in semantic technology here. Today we continue with more expert commentary on the year in review:

Ivan Herman, W3C Semantic Web Activity Lead:

I would mention two things (among many, of course).

  •  Schema.org had an important effect on semantic technologies. Of course, it is controversial (role of one major vocabulary and its relations to others, the community discussions on the syntax, etc.), but I would rather concentrate on the positive aspects. A few years ago the topic of discussion was whether having ‘structured data’, as it is referred to (I would simply say having RDF in some syntax or other), as part of a Web page makes sense or not. There were fairly passionate discussions about this and many were convinced that doing that would not make any sense, there is no use case for it, authors would not use it and could not deal with it, etc. Well, this discussion is over. Structured data in Web sites is here to stay, it is important, and has become part of the Web landscape. Schema.org’s contribution in this respect is very important; the discussions and disagreements I referred to are minor and transient compared to the success. And 2012 was the year when this issue was finally closed.
  •  On a very different aspect (and motivated by my own personal interest) I see exciting moves in the library and the digital publishing world. Many libraries recognize the power of linked data as adopted by libraries, of the value of standard cataloging techniques well adapted to linked data, of the role of metadata, in the form of linked data, adopted by journals and soon by electronic books… All these will have a profound influence bringing a huge amount of very valuable data onto the Web of Data, linking to sources of accumulated human knowledge. I have witnessed different aspects of this evolution coming to the fore in 2012, and I think this will become very important in the years to come.

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Bottlenose Launches New Features, Early-Access Beta of Pro Version

Bottlenose has released several new features based on client feedback. According to the company, “We’ve redesigned the way you can post messages in Bottlenose. You can easily select a list of your many accounts or Facebook pages and post an update (This also works for reposts and replies). Also, we now autocomplete usernames on Twitter so you can easily mention, reply or DM someone.” There is good news for Bitly users as well: “You can now add your Bitly account, which enables you to use your own custom URL shortener when publishing messages. That way you can track clicks and demographics for each update.” Read more

Bottlenose Gains New Seed Funding

According to a new article out of FinSMEs, “Bottlenose, a Los Angeles, CA- and Amsterdam, Netherlands-based discovery engine for the social web, has received funding from ff Venture Capital and Prosper Capital. The new investors have joined the company’s seed financing round, which now totals just under $1m. Previous investors include Gil Elbaz, Andy Dunn, Rick Wittenbraker and Andy Jenks, Mark Lewis, John Hartnett, Nicholas White, etc. The company intends to use the new funds to develop its solutions.” Read more

Twitter Provides More Information on API Direction — But Is It Enough?

Last week we reported here on the progress that Nova Spivack’s #OccupyTwitter petition was making in terms of attracting signatures, and on the petition’s request that Twitter clarify just what its intentions for the developer community are around its API. Many semantic and sentiment analysis applications, of course, depend heavily on the Twitter API.

Well, the end of last week saw a blog post from Michael Sippey of Twitter that provided some more information on the API issue. He wrote:

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Taking It To The Tweets: Petition To Keep Twitter Ecosystem Open Up To More Than 500 Signatures, While App.Net With Its Twitter Alternative Service Surpasses Funding Goals

This week saw a tweet from @bottlenoseapp that the petition to keep the Twitter ecosystem open has moved past the 500-signature goal. Bottlenose, the service co-founded by Nova Spivack, who created the petition and tweeted the same, uses natural language processing, semantic classification, sentiment analytics and trend detection to give users insight into the social stream in real-time (see this story for news on its most recent update).

Bottlenose integrates with Twitter via its API, just as do many other services and apps that need to post data to and get data from Twitter – whether they are semantic in nature or not. So, Twitter’s move earlier this summer that appeared to be imposing restrictions on how third party developers use its API, in the name of delivering a more consistent Twitter consumption experience, is an understandable concern.

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Bottlenose Wants To Own The “Now” In Social Network Discovery

Bottlenose is entering its next phase of helping people discover trends in the social networking world in real-time, and in a smarter way. As co-founder Nova Spivack describes it, “Bottlenose shows what is important on social networks, the next generation of the Internet. It’s not about the web anymore but about messages and change happening in social networks.” With its real-time discovery engine, Bottlenose “curates the collective consciousness,” he says.

The social media dashboard for surfing the social stream in a unified way remains in place, with the Sonar technology for detecting talk around topics personalized to users’ interests and letting people track topics over time. On average, Spivack says, users are spending 90 minutes a day with that part of the service. The second step in the app’s strategy hones in on measuring the crowd in real-time, and what is getting attention on the global network (as compared to the personal one) to pinpoint trending news, pictures and links.

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