Posts Tagged ‘Britain’

Britain Capitalizes on Internet of Things?

Photo of the Union Jack courtesy flickr / defenceimagesGerard Grech recently wrote, “When you hear the term “the internet of things”, what immediately comes to mind? If you’ve been following recent stories in the media, you might have it pegged as the Big New Thing to revolutionise all our lives any minute now. Equally, you might be forgiven for thinking it’s a lot of hype generated by overexcited tech types and inflated billion-dollar deals. The truth, as ever, lies somewhere in the middle. The combination of connected products, together with intelligent data analysis, has the potential to transform the way we produce goods, run machinery, manage our cities and improve our lives. The internet of things is a real phenomenon and will take off in much the same way as the worldwide web did back in the 1990s.”

Grech continued, “And, just like the web, the full deployment of IoT across industries will take time, talent and persistence. The question is not whether it is going to happen, but what part the UK will play in it all. Consumers stand to benefit from electricity meters that talk to the grid to get the best deals, and health monitors that provide minute-by-minute data on people’s heart rates. With Google’s acquisition of Nest Labs and Samsung’s recent purchase of SmartThings, we will soon have access to a suite of clever gadgets that will create our future “smart” home. It’s a beguiling vision, albeit one with alarm bells (privacy and security obviously need resolving). But the real power of the internet of things lies beyond eye-catching consumer goods.”

Read more here.

Image courtesy flickr / defenceimages

Opening Up Scientific Publishing in Britain

The Economist has published an article regarding the need to open up publically funded science. The article states, “If there is any endeavour whose fruits should be freely available, that endeavour is surely publicly financed science. Morally, taxpayers who wish to should be able to read about it without further expense. And science advances through cross-fertilisation between projects. Barriers to that exchange slow it down. There is a widespread feeling that the journal publishers who have mediated this exchange for the past century or more are becoming an impediment to it. One of the latest converts is the British government. On July 16th it announced that, from 2013, the results of taxpayer-financed research would be available, free and online, for anyone to read and redistribute.” Read more