Posts Tagged ‘call for participation’

Submission Deadline for Semantic Technology & Business Conference is this Friday

LOGO: Semantic Technology & Business Conference; June 2-5, 2013, San Francisco, CaliforniaThere’s still time to make a speaking proposal for the Semantic Technology & Business Conference, June 2-5 in San Francisco.

Once again, we plan to make it the biggest and most comprehensive educational conference on the business of semantic technologies. Contribute to this event by sharing the practical experience you have gained in your own semantic projects. Speaking offers numerous benefits including an unparalleled platform to gain exposure for your institution; increased credibility for your business, project or team; and the opportunity to convey your goals and vision with an audience of attendees from around the world.

We are looking for case studies big and small – whether you’re building a semantic start-up, a large enterprise implementation, or you’ve done semantic annotation on a local business web site. They are all relevant, because the curiosity of the audience is so rich and diverse. We are looking for 3-hour tutorials, 45-minute breakout sessions and panels, and 5 minute lightning talks.

The Call for Presentations ends this Friday, January 18, so get your abstract together now. All the information you need and the links to submit your presentation proposal, are HERE.

Proposals will be reviewed by our outstanding Program Advisory Committee.

Conference registration is also open. Register by February 7 and save with substantial early bird discounts.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me at Eric[ at ]SemanticWeb.com

Thanks,

Eric Franzon & Stewart Quealy
Conference Co-Chairs

Call for Participation: An Open Data Survey

Paul Miller recently called on Open Data professionals to participate in a brief survey. He writes, “Back in 2006 as we rolled out the first public draft of the Talis Community Licence, the world of data licensing seemed a simple place. Today, the Open Knowledge Foundation‘s Data Hub contains 3,888 data sets, many of which are explicitly licensed with respect to the Open Definition. But many are still not explicitly licensed. Over at the UK Government, there are 8,619 data sets today, and an assertion that ‘in general, the data is licensed under the Open Government License.’ Too much still isn’t, of course, but they’re getting there. And then there are the many, many more data sets out on the web, not registered with repositories like the Data Hub or data.gov.uk at all. More than four years on, how are we really doing?” Read more