Posts Tagged ‘cognitive computing’

Analyzing Cognitive Computing

image of neuronsJamie Bisker reported, “Most consumers and professionals of all types have a basic feeling about technological innovation as something positive. It is true that we may bemoan the loss of a favorite aspect of the past, and tend to recall for the most part only favorable situations that strengthen such memories. But, in general, people feel upbeat about the convenience and capabilities that technology can provide. We evoke pleasant feelings from the past and that is our nature. It is also our nature, at a very deep biological level, to anticipate the future.

Jeff Hawkins, in his book On Intelligence, highlights research he both collected and directs about the physiological aspect of how neurons in the brain are connected. He has shown that prediction is basically wired in to a large portion of neural circuitry. Hawkins named this approach as a “memory-prediction framework.” He also makes the case for prediction as being one of the foundations of human intelligence.”

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Combining Connectivity with Cognitive Computing

Photo of David LoshinA recent report from David Loshin states, “As our world becomes more attuned to the generation, and more importantly, the use of massive amounts of data, information technology (IT) professionals are increasingly looking to new technologies to help focus on deriving value from the velocity of data streaming from a wide variety of data sources. The breadth of the internet and its connective capabilities has enabled the evolution of the internet of things (IoT), a dynamic ecosystem that facilitates the exchange of information among a cohort of devices organized to meet specific business needs. It does this through a growing, yet intricate interconnection of uniquely identifiable computing resources, using the internet’s infrastructure and employing internet protocols. Extending beyond the traditional system-to-system networks, these connected devices span the architectural palette, from traditional computing systems, to specialty embedded computer modules, down to tiny micro-sensors with mobile-networking capabilities.”

Loshin added, “In this paper, geared to the needs of the C-suite, we’ll explore the future of predictive analytics by looking at some potential use cases in which multiple data sets from different types of devices contribute to evolving models that provide value and benefits to hierarchies of vested stakeholders. We’ll also introduce the concept of the “insightful fog,” in which storage models and computing demands are distributed among interconnected devices, facilitating business discoveries that influence improved operations and decisions. We’ll then summarize the key aspects of the intelligent systems that would be able to deliver on the promise of this vision.”

The full report, “How IT can blend massive connectivity with cognitive computing to enable insights” is available for download for a fee.

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Can IBM’s New Smart Chip Think Like a Human?

ibmTim Beyers of The Motley Fool recently wrote, “For years, International Business Machines has been dabbling with what it calls ‘cognitive computing.’ Now the company that brought you the Watson supercomputer believes it has a chip that can think like the human brain. Called TrueNorth, the chip draws on some 5.4 billion interconnected transistors to form a vast network not unlike the neural networks found in the human brain. That’s a potentially massive breakthrough, especially for Internet-connected mobile devices that encounter new data every second. We’re likely to be years away from mass production of the TrueNorth chip. And even then, experts quoted in this article in The New York Times seem to be split on its potential impact.” Read more

A Deeper Look at Common Sense Reasoning

Siri LogoCatherine Havasi, CEO of Luminoso recently wrote for Tech Crunch, “Everyone knows that ‘water is wet,’ and ‘people want to be happy,’ and we assume everyone we meet shares this knowledge. It forms the basis of how we interact and allows us to communicate quickly, efficiently, and with deep meaning. As advanced as technology is today, its main shortcoming as it becomes a large part of daily life in society is that it does not share these assumptions. We find ourselves talking more and more to our devices — to our mobile phones and even our televisions. But when we talk to Siri, we often find that the rules that underlie her can’t comprehend exactly what we want if we stray far from simple commands. For this vision to be fulfilled, we’ll need computers to understand us as we talk to each other in a natural environment. For that, we’ll need to continue to develop the field of common-sense reasoning — without it, we’re never going to be able to have an intelligent conversation with Siri, Google Glass or our Xbox.” Read more

Cognitive Computing And Semantic Technology: When Worlds Connect

ccimageIn mid-July Dataversity.net, the sister site of The Semantic Web Blog, hosted a webinar on Understanding The World of Cognitive Computing. Semantic technology naturally came up during the session, which was moderated by Steve Ardire, an advisor to cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning startups. You can find a recording of the event here.

Here, you can find a more detailed discussion of the session at large, but below are some excerpts related to how the worlds of cognitive computing and semantic technology interact.

One of the panelists, IBM Big Data Evangelist James Kobielus, discussed his thinking around what’s missing from general discussions of cognitive computing to make it a reality. “How do we normally perceive branches of AI, and clearly the semantic web and semantic analysis related to natural language processing and so much more has been part of the discussion for a long time,” he said. When it comes to finding the sense in multi-structured – including unstructured – content that might be text, audio, images or video, “what’s absolutely essential is that as you extract the patterns you are able to tag the patterns, the data, the streams, really deepen the metadata that gets associated with that content and share that metadata downstream to all consuming applications so that they can fully interpret all that content, those objects…[in] whatever the relevant context is.”

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Digital Reasoning Takes On Early Risk Detection For Compliance- And Security-Sensitive Sectors

synthimageDigital Reasoning’s Synthesys machine learning platform (which The Semantic Web Blog initially covered here) this summer should see its Version 3.9 release. The update will build on the 3.8 release, which delivered with its Glance user interface the discovery and investigative capabilities that help information analysts in finance, intelligence and other compliance- and security-sensitive sectors react to findings in user profiles of interest and their associated relationships, activities and risks. Version 3.9 takes on the proactive part of the equation — early risk detection — via its Scout user interface.

Last year, the company honed in on compliance use cases ranging from insider trading to money laundering with Version 3.7 of Synthesys (covered here). There, the technology for discovering the meaning in unstructured data at scale, highlighting important entities in context, was applied to email communications for organizations such as financial institutions that have to be on the lookout for conversations that cross compliance boundaries.

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Smarter Enterprise Data with Machine Learning and Cognitive Computing

Watson

Jorge Garcia of Wired recently wrote, “IBM’s recent announcements of three new services based in Watson technology make it clear that there is pressure in the enterprise software space to incorporate new technologies, both in hardware and software, in order to keep pace with modern business. It seems we are approaching another turning point in technology where many concepts that were previously limited to academic research or very narrow industry niches are now being considered for mainstream enterprise software applications. Machine learning, along with many other disciplines within the field of artificial intelligence and cognitive systems, is gaining popularity, and it may in the not so distant future have a colossal impact on the software industry. This first part of my series on machine learning explores some basic concepts of the discipline and its potential for transforming the business intelligence and analytics space.” Read more

IBM Watson Group CTO Discusses Cognitive Computing, Content Curation For Healthcare Market

robhighThe role that cognitive computing can play in healthcare was explored last week in this story published at The Semantic Web Blog’s sister site Dataversity.net. That article looked at how Modernizing Medicine is leveraging IBM Watson for its new schEMA tablet app that helps doctors use the wealth of published medical research from highly reputable sources, such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and New England Journal of Medicine, to answer their questions.

Today, we’re complementing that article to further explore such aspects of the health care and cognitive computing connection based on an email conversation with IBM Watson Group CTO Robert High. “IBM Watson is transforming the patient experience and healthcare delivery system by helping physicians make sense of the enormous amount of data generated by an increasingly connected healthcare environment,” High writes.

“Content curation is a critical part of the solution delivery process. Without reputable and reliable sources of medical literature, therapy choices offered by Watson may not have the supporting evidence needed to inform clinicians in the use of those treatments. We work with the top clinicians at our partners to collect their feedback on supporting evidence and cull inappropriate information from their sources.” IBM, along with its solutions partners, works with a variety of content providers based on the relevance of their materials to treatment options, he adds.

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Industry’s First Cognitive Computing App Builder

ApOrchid - VisionApp Orchid Inc recently announced the industry’s first Cognitive Computing app builder. The announcement states, “Emerging from stealth mode, AppOrchid Inc. announced today its disruptive new technology for developing cognitive apps that targets the multi-billion dollar “Internet of Everything” (IoE) market. “The future for enterprise computing lies in intelligent or cognitive apps. In this new “Internet of everything” world, connected devices, social data and massive volumes of free form documents integrate with enterprise applications in real-time. AppOrchid’s groundbreaking products employ Big Data technology and a scalable Knowledge graph model powered with intelligent natural language processing. The end result is human-like intelligence, with a gamified user experience spanning conventional, handheld and wearable devices. This is a watershed moment in Enterprise computing”, said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of AppOrchid Inc.”

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DATAVERSITY and SemanticWeb.com Launch Cognitive Computing Forum

Cognitive COmputig Forum logoDATAVERSITY™ and SemanticWeb.com have announced the first Cognitive Computing Forum in San Jose, California, on August 20-21, 2014. This two-day conference was developed to help attendees understand the new world of Cognitive Analytics, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Reasoning and next generation Artificial Intelligence. Visit www.cognitivecomputingforum.com to view speakers, the agenda, registration options, and to learn more about this unique event.

Cognitive systems are the next stage in the evolution of smarter computing and are often described as emulating the human brain. Built upon recent advances in technologies such as natural language processing, machine learning, sensors, and neural networks, and combined with massive computational power, cognitive computing promises to bring staggering improvements to applications. Among the biggest improvements are expected in predictive analytics, robot intelligence, computer-based reasoning, and human annotation. New technologies and companies are on the horizon, and these top technologies will be represented and available to attendees throughout the event.

DATAVERSITY has enlisted a world-class group of speakers to lead the in-depth presentations at the conference. Tom Mitchell, Professor of AI and Learning at Carnegie Mellon University; Chris Welty, Research Scientist at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center; Ted Dunning, Chief Application Architect at MapR, and Google Fellow R.V. Guhaare among the industry experts on the schedule.

Discover the potential of Cognitive Computing for your organization and register your staff for this event. Register two staff members from the same organization and the third is free. See details at www.cognitivecomputingforum.com on this and other discounts available now.

The inaugural Cognitive Computing Forum will be co-located with the 10th Annual Semantic Technology & Business Conference and the fourth annual NoSQL Now! conference.

If you are a member of the press and would like to attend, please request a Press Pass by contacting Samantha Taylor at sam@dataversity.net.

 

 

Read the full press release here.

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