Posts Tagged ‘content management system’

Daedalus Takes Meaning-As-A-Service To Excel, GATE And CMS Systems

meaningasaserviceDaedalus (which The Semantic Web Blog originally covered here) has just made its Textalytics meaning-as-a-service APIs available for Excel and GATE (General Architecture for Text Engineering), a JAVA suite of tools used for natural language processing tasks, including information extraction in many languages. Connecting its semantic analysis tools with these systems is one step in a larger plan to extend its integration capabilities with more API plug-ins.

“For us, integration options are a way to lower barriers to adoption and to foster the development of an ecosystem around Textalytics,” says Antonio Matarranz, who leads marketing and sales for Daedalus. The three main ecosystem scenarios, he says, include personal productivity tools, of which the Excel add-in is an example, and NLP environments, of which GATE is an example. “But UIMA (Unstructured Information Management Applications) is also a target,” he says. The list also is slated to include content management systems and search engines, among them open source systems like WordPress, Drupal, and Elasticsearch.

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Enterprise Search Doesn’t Have To Stink

reamyimgaeThere’s one thing that Tom Reamy, chief knowledge architect at KAPS Group, says is a continual refrain among enterprise business users: Search sucks. IT regularly attempts to make things better by buying new search engines and for awhile, everything’s good – until content grows and things start to go downhill again.

Enterprise search, he explained to an audience at this week’s Enterprise Search & Discovery summit, “is never going to be solved by search engine technology” alone. It needs a helping hand from a number of different corners to improve the experience. Good governance and taxonomies can help, for example. But there are challenges in their use, such as the fact that the people who write documents for enterprise repositories can be very creative at avoiding tasks they don’t consider their jobs, such as categorizing documents for others to find during their searches, and even if they’re willing to do it, figuring out what a document is about is a very complex decision.

And, as beautiful a structure as a taxonomy may be to behold, marrying it to millions of documents is itself complex in scale and purpose for both authors and librarians who may have had nothing to do with its creation and so can’t be counted on to apply it well.

Less recognized for the role it can play in rescuing enterprise search is text analytics.

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Taking Search To The Enterprise Streets

What can semantic search do for your enterprise? One example comes from the recently launched Searchbox online semantic search engine by the company of the same name (which formerly was known as salsaDev).

One of the vendor’s biggest customers is the European Commission, according to Nicolas Gamard, CEO of the Switzerland-based company. That early adopter of Searchbox is using the technology for improving search related to its public grants funding, which amounts to tens of billions of dollars since 2007. Before deploying Searchbox, both researchers and its own commissioners struggled with conducting searches across 15 different repositories, as they looked for previously funded projects and partnership possibilities across the continent, for example. Tooling through a research grant PDF document of some 150 to 600 pages was another time-consuming issue, he says.

“It was like a full-time job just to look at all the different data sources. Things were not formatted in the same way – they used different terms and structures,” Gamard says.

Today, Searchbox powers a single web application for the European Commission, where all such content is interlinked together. “So, if a researcher is looking at a grant, we suggest all the related relevant research grants, partnership opportunities across Europe, all previously funded projects, and all the information he or she needs,” says Gamard. “That’s done automatically so that, within a single look, within 5 minutes you can have identified all the research opportunities right for you.”

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OpenMenu Serves Up Structured Data Standards For the Restaurant Industry

What’s on the markup menu for the restaurant industry?

Among the schema.org tags for marking up web pages is one for restaurants, which includes item properties for priceRange, servesCuisine, place, and menu, among others. Restaurants that use the markup language to structure their data are promised search engine optimization (SEO) benefits when hungry consumers want to see what’s on the menu at moderately-priced nearby Italian eateries, for example. They might also or alternately use the GoodRelations ontology for e-commerce to better accommodate search engines, as well as mobile and desktop apps, with service details of hours, payment options, and daily menus that are accessible in up to 50 languages.

OpenMenu has a value proposition around structured data for restaurant owners, too: Providing increased exposure to Internet, mobile and web apps, via what it aims to be a global and open standard for storing, sharing and using their menus over the Internet. The technical details are described at its OpenMenu.org site. Initially launched in 2010, it recently updated the format to Version 1.6 and currently counts about 75,000 menus as part of its landscape – 5,000 of them actively maintained and growing at a couple of thousand a week, according to CEO and founder Chris Hanscom.

Third-party developers can harness the data too, to build applications that interact with menus, like OpenMenu Search, a way for a search engine to drill down through a restaurant’s information to the menu and menu items.

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Smartlogic Highlights Content Intelligence Over Enterprise Semantics

Smartlogic recently released a new version of its Semaphore software, which took home the 2011 European Frost & Sullivan Technology Innovation Award. Version 3.3 adds new semantically-rich features, but the company itself has been shifting its strategy to talk about its solution less as the enterprise semantic platform and more as a content intelligence platform for identifying, classifying, extracting, analyzing and utilizing hard-to-find information from among unstructured assets in existing information management systems like Microsoft SharePoint.

Why? According to marketing VP Maya Natarajan, it’s an in to better customer access. “Whenever you think of the word semantic, there’s such a small percentage of the population that understands what it is,” she says. “But amazingly the uptake for content intelligence is so great. People immediately understand that so much quicker” — that is, she says, that content intelligence describes all the business reasons and benefits for deploying an enterprise semantic platform.

Another way to make the virtues of content intelligence even more obvious: Smartlogic is planning to introduce prebuilt starter taxonomies to kickstart the process in some vertical sectors. Meanwhile, Version 3.3 has brought to its customers features that still proclaim its semantic heritage, including a semantic visualization tool.

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Webnodes Launches New Version of CMS with schema.org Support

Webnodes AS has announced version 3.7 of their content management system with schema.org support. According to the article, “With this release, Webnodes is the world’s first CMS with fully integrated and dynamic Schema.org support. This means that all content classes and properties in Webnodes can be mapped to corresponding types and properties in Schema.org dynamically.” Read more

Improving the CMS with Semantic Technology

Janus Boye recently shared a presentation on how semantic technologies can help content management system customers better benefit from their data. Boye states, “Today there are probably 1,000+ content management systems in use in the European Union. Very few of these are using semantics-based technologies, which holds the promise to substantially improve employee productivity and how we use our skills online.” Read more

An RDF based Permissions Model

GatesOne of the primary challenges in putting together a good content management system is building a decent permissions model. Whether a particular user or process is able to perform some kind of an action upon a resource or not can be remarkably difficult to establish, especially when there are multiple constraints involved. For an XML-based CMS, this can be even more of a challenge, because the n-dimensional nature of such a constraint model is often difficult to model in hierarchical structures.

However, RDF is far more ideally suited for this particular role. A permissions system is, at its core, a set of assertions about who can do what to what, which fits nicely with the “subject predicate object” model that RDF exemplifies. Moreover, because such models are sparse — the number of assertions is likely to be very small compared to the total potential assertions that are possible — this fits nicely into models where sparseness of data is a common characteristic (again, RDF), as compared to storing this information (expensively) in tabular fields as with a relational database.

I’m working on building an XML-based CMS (specifically on a MarkLogic platform, though I would like to keep it portable), and realized as I was working on it that while the user permissions system that MarkLogic employs is powerful, it’s not portable and there are facets that don’t fit nicely into that particular model. Thus, I decided to chase the RDF triples approach to see if that would work better for this. (The end product may very well be a hybrid approach to take advantage of fast queries, but that’s beyond the scope of this particular article).

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Is the Publishing Industry Ready to Embrace Change? Find Out At The Semantic Web Media Summit

The publishing industry is an interesting beast: Its front-end moves rapidly to get content out to readers, but its back-end processes to deliver that information are so tightly packed that there’s not a lot of drive to make sweeping changes in those technologies or processes.

“They have to be on this schedule, so traditionally they have been slow to change their operations,” says Rachel Lovinger, associate experience director at interactive agency Razorfish.  At next week’s Semantic Web Media Summit taking place in New York City, Lovinger will be among the speakers discussing topics such as whether the industry’s tolerance for change is growing, given its need to find more innovative ways both to reach audiences and be more profitable.

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Semantic Technology: It’s All About The Business

The opening keynote sessions at SemTech this week made one thing abundantly clear: Semantic technology is for business, and it’s time to start putting it in practice there.

“Semantics is a game changer in the B-to-C model,” said Bill Guinn, CTO Product Enablers, Amdocs Product Business Unit. The company’s focus is on delivering customer care and experience systems in the telco space, but Guinn’s address was centered on “applying semantics in any situation that involves complex and recurring relationships between business and consumers,” with the aim of improving revenue, reducing costs, and retaining customers.

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