Posts Tagged ‘DataSift’

Good-Bye 2013

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

As we prepare to greet the New Year, we take a look back at the year that was. Some of the leading voices in the semantic web/Linked Data/Web 3.0 and sentiment analytics space give us their thoughts on the highlights of 2013.

Read on:

 

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

The completion and rapid adoption of the updated SPARQL specs, the use of Linked Data (LD) in life sciences, the adoption of LD by the European Commission, and governments in the UK, The Netherlands (NL) and more [stand out]. In other words, [we are seeing] the maturation and growing acknowledgement of the advantages of the technologies.

I contributed to a recent study into the use of Linked Data within governments. We spoke to various UK government departments as well as the UN FAO, the German National Library and more. The roadblocks and enablers section of the study (see here) is useful IMO.

Bottom line: Those organisations use LD because it suits them. It makes their own tasks easier, it allows them to fulfill their public tasks more effectively. They don’t do it to be cool, and they don’t do it to provide 5-Star Linked Data to others. They do it for hard headed and self-interested reasons.

Christine Connors, founder and information strategist, TriviumRLG:

What sticks out in my mind is the resource market: We’ve seen more “semantic technology” job postings, academic positions and M&A activity than I can remember in a long time. I think that this is a noteworthy trend if my assessment is accurate.

There’s also been a huge increase in the attentions of the librarian community, thanks to long-time work at the Library of Congress, from leading experts in that field and via schema.org.

Read more

DataSift Now Offers Historical Data Analysis Across Twitter Facebook, & More

DataSift

Sarah Perez of TechCrunch reports, “Fresh on the heels of its deal with Tumblr for access to the Tumblr ‘firehose,’ social data platform DataSift is putting that data, and more, to good use with the launch of a new API that performs historical analysis across Twitter, Tumblr, and Bit.ly ‘firehoses,’ as well as data pulled from forums, blogs and public Facebook data. With ‘Historic Preview,’ as DataSift is calling it, developers have the ability to perform historical analysis across all sources combined, using four different analysis types. These include: frequency distribution, numeric statistical analysis, target volume, and word count (a list of up to 100 of the most often used words). The analysis functions can be applied to all 400+ metadata fields, the company says.” Read more

Good-Bye to 2012: Continuing Our Look Back At The Year In Semantic Tech

Courtesy: Flickr/LadyDragonflyCC <3

Yesterday we began our look back at the year in semantic technology here. Today we continue with more expert commentary on the year in review:

Ivan Herman, W3C Semantic Web Activity Lead:

I would mention two things (among many, of course).

  •  Schema.org had an important effect on semantic technologies. Of course, it is controversial (role of one major vocabulary and its relations to others, the community discussions on the syntax, etc.), but I would rather concentrate on the positive aspects. A few years ago the topic of discussion was whether having ‘structured data’, as it is referred to (I would simply say having RDF in some syntax or other), as part of a Web page makes sense or not. There were fairly passionate discussions about this and many were convinced that doing that would not make any sense, there is no use case for it, authors would not use it and could not deal with it, etc. Well, this discussion is over. Structured data in Web sites is here to stay, it is important, and has become part of the Web landscape. Schema.org’s contribution in this respect is very important; the discussions and disagreements I referred to are minor and transient compared to the success. And 2012 was the year when this issue was finally closed.
  •  On a very different aspect (and motivated by my own personal interest) I see exciting moves in the library and the digital publishing world. Many libraries recognize the power of linked data as adopted by libraries, of the value of standard cataloging techniques well adapted to linked data, of the role of metadata, in the form of linked data, adopted by journals and soon by electronic books… All these will have a profound influence bringing a huge amount of very valuable data onto the Web of Data, linking to sources of accumulated human knowledge. I have witnessed different aspects of this evolution coming to the fore in 2012, and I think this will become very important in the years to come.

Read more

Datasift Announces Wikistats

Datasift recently announced a new feature, Wikistats, and added Wikipedia to the company’s list of data sources. The company reports, “Through Wikistats.co, DataSift provides a real-time insight into the trending articles on Wikipedia in the last 24 hours. Just as we identified the most popular stories on Twitter when we created Tweetmeme, Wikistats is another great showcase of what’s possible with DataSift’s Social-Data platform. By filtering and analyzing the activity stream of new articles and edits on Wikipedia, we’re able to surface an insight into the top articles and content being created. As well as providing a view into all articles on Wikipedia, we use our NLP (Natural Language Processing) service to categorize articles into popular categories including technology, banking, celebrities, politics, sports, and more.” Read more

Twitter Sells Tweets to DataSift

Twitter has sold its old tweets to DataSift, a company that plans to analyze the tweets for marketing purposes. DataSift is the first company to get access to these tweets which go back two years. According to one article, DataSift has “launched a product called DataSift Historics, which lets companies extract insights and trends that relate to brands, businesses, financial markets, news and public opinion, a rep says. DataSift will analyze public tweets, not private ones. If you delete a tweet, it’s deleted from DataSift’s archives.” Read more

People Search Service PeekYou Sees Personal ID Layer As Driving Future of Semantic Web

How does a site like PeekYou, whose goal is to re-index the public web around people, intersect with the Semantic Web?

To hear CEO Michael Hussey tell it, it’s this: “The way I thought about the Semantic Web since Day One is that it’s about deriving meaning from pages,” says Hussey. “To have meaning you have to know who the person who writes this blog is or who is referenced in this article. That’s how humans think. When you meet someone, you ask where he is from, what he does. The personal layer is what drives the future of the semantic web.”

And the personal layer is very much where PeekYou is at.

Read more

Spivack’s Bottleno.se Built To Match Scale of Exploding Message Stream

The Twitter stream, says Nova Spivack, will be a victim of its own success unless we come up with new ways to filter and make sense of it. So that’s what he’s doing with his latest venture, Bottleno.se (which you’ve probably heard about in that very stream over the last few days).

Bottleno.se is diving in where Twitter Annotations ultimately didn’t tread. Named for our smart mammalian cousin with its extraordinary sonar system, Bottleno.se is setting out to help the more-power Twitter users (other social networks, like Facebook, will be wrangled too) navigate the exploding stream in real time.

“There are 150 million messages a day now,” says Spivack, whose other ventures include Klout, LiveMatrix and of course, Twine. And he’s confident that the growth experienced so far, some three times as many Twitter messages as last year, is going to be exponential, not linear. “Next year there will be more than 3 times – four times or four, five, or six times as many messages,” he predicts, with not just people but apps automatically tweeting too.

Read more